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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 39  (July to December 1860)

Punch,  39 (1860), [v–viiii].

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Introduction

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Reportage



Notes

Subjects:

Astronomy, Progress, Time, Instruments


    Anticipates several articles: one detailing the time, duration, and effect on temperature, of the solar eclipse (see Anon, 'Effects of the Recent Eclipse', Punch, 39 (1860), 39), another discussing Smiles 1859 Smiles, Samuel 1859. Self-Help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct, London: John Murray
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(see , Anon, 'Men Who Have Helped Themselves', Punch, 39 (1860), 92), and another noting the death and considerable bequest of Edward J Dent Dent, Edward John (1790–1853) ODNB
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(see , Cresswell Cresswell, 'Sir C. C.'s Last', Punch, 39 (1860), 231).




Issue 991 (7 July 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 3.

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A Planetary Pervert

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Meteorology


Punch,  39 (1860), 10.

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The Umbrella Rifle

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War


    Describes Mr Punch's 'Umbrella Rifle', in which he seeks to interest the newly-formed volunteer force. This weapon enables users to 'shield them[selves] from a soaking while it provides them with the means of opening a hot fire'. It consists of an umbrella attached to the rifle muzzle and has been designed to save uniforms from being damaged by rain and damp soldiers from paying doctors' bills.



Punch,  39 (1860), 10.

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The Practical Housewife

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Gravity, Domestic Economy

People mentioned:

Isaac Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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Issue 992 (14 July 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 19.

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The Ladies' Own Rifle Corps

Angelina Smith Smith, Angelina
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Gender, Health


    Argues that a rifle corps for ladies would provide drill and accordingly 'healthy exercise for girls'.



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Issue 993 (21 July 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 21–22.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Light, Manufactories, Commerce, Government


    Notes the House of Commons House of Commons
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discussion of a bill for 'making Gas Companies behave with some sort of fairness and honesty'. Despite the tactful defence of gas companies provided by the statesman Meaburn Staniland Staniland, Meaburn (1809–1867 or after) Stenton 1976
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, Punch points out that people will still refuse to believe that 'Companies ought to charge high for bad gas'. (21)



Punch,  39 (1860), 24.

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Can Toads Live Without Air?

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Physiology, Health, Pollution, Nutrition


    Claiming that this subject is now 'occupying the scientific', reports Mr Punch's observation that a party of French officials recently travelled a great distance in a smoke-filled railway carriage. Concludes that those who eat toads can clearly survive without air.



Punch,  39 (1860), 27.

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Paradoxes and Puzzles

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Mechanics, Language


    Puzzled by an advertisement for 'Comfort and the Hydrostatic Paradox', and suggests that if a coffee-pot is to be styled the 'Hydrostatic Paradox', then a 'roasting-jack' may be 'denominated the Differential Calculus'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 28.

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Forgetfulness Cured by Smelling

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Narcotics, Psychology


    Following an advertisement for a perfume that allegedly improves the memory, Punch wonders how this can be achieved. Agrees that a pinch of snuff can 'stimulate the power of recollection'. Suggests several uses of this perfume, including enabling 'the poor washerwoman' to remind herself of the 'fashionable ladies' who forget to pay her bills, reminding gentlemen of their 'small commissions or necessary purchases', and reminding candidates at a Civil Service Civil Service
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examination of the 'cram which they had forgotten'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 28–29.

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Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIII—All About Arms and Armour  [23/42]Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XIX—Contains More About the Knights in the Days of Richard the First and John', Punch, 38 (1860), 240
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIV—The Reigns of Edward the First and Edward the Second', Punch, 39 (1860), 38–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XXVII—Three Words More About the Reign of King Edward the Third', Punch, 39 (1860), 68–69
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXXIV—The Time of Henry the Sixth', Punch, 39 (1860), 168
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XL—Should be Read by all Tragedians Before they Dress for Richard III', Punch, 39 (1860), 238–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XLI—Bids Adieu to Henry the Seventh and Au Revior to Henry the Fourth', Punch, 39 (1860), 248–49

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Anon

Genre:

Serial, Essay, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Military Technology, War


    Noting the great changes that were supposed to have taken place in 'military equipment' during the thirteenth century, describes the changes in the military helmet, and draws attention to its increasingly cumbersome size. Later, describes the introduction of chain-mail as a replacement for the 'old flat-ringed form of armour', and the different shields and 'implements of manslaughter' used during the reign of Edward I Edward I, King of England and Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine (1239–1307) ODNB
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. (29) One illustration shows a figure wearing a massive helmet shaped like a barrel.



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Issue 994 (28 July 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 31–32.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Chemistry, Narcotics, Medical Treatment, Astronomy, Mental Illness, Light, Manufactories, Commerce


    Likens the way in which William E Gladstone Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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used the duty on paper to raise revenue to a chemist who extracts 'medicines from poisonous herbs' (31). Referring to the recent solar eclipse, claims that the moon passed a resolution that 'the Sun was unworthy of the confidence of the Earth' and so placed herself between these two celestial bodies. As the eclipse was only partial, reports on the moon's decision to move out of the way of the sun. Notes that this event prompted discussion of the bill for dealing with gas manufacturers who overcharge. (32)



Punch,  39 (1860), 37.

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Giles Scroggins's Journal

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Experiment, Quackery, Charlatanry

Publications cited:

Owen 1860 Owen, Robert Dale 1860. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World: With Narrative Illustrations, Philadelphia: J. P. Lippincott & Co
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    Discusses two reports of spirit manifestations announced in the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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, which appear to suggest that the 'Spirit Medium and Clairvoyante' Louise Besson Besson, Louise (fl. 1860) PU1/39/4/2
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was 'astonishing' audiences in two different places at the same time. Questions whether the aristocratic witnesses to one of these events, when they complemented Besson 'on her "spirit manifestations"', were congratulating her 'as a witch or an artist'. Following Besson's apparent ability to 'command spiritual manifestations nearly wherever she pleases', the author asks her to do so at the Punch office. Turning to other material in the 'credulous' Spiritual Magazine—which Punch christens 'Giles Scroggins's Journal' after a poem by Charles I M Dibdin Dibdin, Charles Isaac Mungo (1768–1833) ODNB
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featuring a character of this name (see Dibdin 1807 Dibdin, Charles 1807. Mirth and Metre: Consisting of Poems, Serious, Humorous, and Satirical; Songs, Sonnets, Ballads, and Bagatelles, London: Vernor [and 2 others]
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)—notes the poor grammar of messages allegedly 'transmitted by a departed spirit through the hand of a medium', messages which suggest that spirits are like 'most rogues'. Warns its 'spiritual contemporary' against ridiculing truth and 'that experiments which cannot be performed except under certain conditions which are among those of jugglery are inconclusive, and that it is the peculiarity of all quacks and enthusiasts, whether religious or scientific, to resent derision of their impostures or delusions'. Draws attention to the Spiritual Magazine's claim that both John S Copley (1st Baron Lyndhurst) Copley, John Singleton, the younger, 1st Baron Lyndhurst (1772–1863) ODNB
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and Henry P Brougham (1st Baron Brougham and Vaux) Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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are spiritualists, but points to the unlikelihood that 'any alleged spiritual manifestation is genuine'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 38–39.

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Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIV—The Reigns of Edward the First and Edward the Second  [24/42]Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XIX—Contains More About the Knights in the Days of Richard the First and John', Punch, 38 (1860), 240
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIII—All About Arms and Armour', Punch, 39 (1860), 28–29
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XXVII—Three Words More About the Reign of King Edward the Third', Punch, 39 (1860), 68–69
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXXIV—The Time of Henry the Sixth', Punch, 39 (1860), 168
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XL—Should be Read by all Tragedians Before they Dress for Richard III', Punch, 39 (1860), 238–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XLI—Bids Adieu to Henry the Seventh and Au Revior to Henry the Fourth', Punch, 39 (1860), 248–49

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War


    Discusses some of the 'weapons of offence' used in the reign of King Edward I Edward I, King of England and Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine (1239–1307) ODNB
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(including the scimitar and falcastrum), and proceeds to describe the stronger types of armour developed to withstand these heavier weapons. Explains why a 'greater quantity of plate was worn mixed with chain', which does 'not mean that knights carried more forks and spoons about them'. (38)



Punch,  39 (1860), 39.

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Effects of the Recent Eclipse

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation, Amateurism, Politics, Magnetism, Narcotics, Meteorology


    Considering Punch Punch (1841–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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the 'first scientific journal of the day', presents the 'fullest, truest, and the most particular account' of the recent solar eclipse, exploiting the observations of its 'sharpest-eyed' contributors. Laments the fact that it received written reports of the eclipse from a drunkard and that the documents contained information that could have been obtained without the reporter and his 'scientific co-labourers' venturing to Greenwich. However, notes that the reports will 'show the future HERSCHEL Herschel, Sir John Frederick William (1792–1871) DSB ODNB
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' some of the 'strange effects' accompanying the eclipse which were not reported in 'any other journal'. Presents five spoof reports of these effects. These include reports by Smith, who linked the eclipse to politicians being 'in the dark' about the war with China and William E Gladstone's Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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'Spirit-Tax', by Tittle, who stated that the 'marked magnetic variation' during the eclipse caused a 'deviation' in the object of affection of 'several single gentlemen', and by Walker, who related that Mr Swizzler announced how much beer he had drunk on being 'urged by a scientific friend to make a note of what "precipitation of moisture" accompanied the Eclipse'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 39.

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Donkey-Pastures in Richmond Park

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture


    Discusses the costly drainage of Richmond Park, which has resulted in 'the development of a plentiful crop of—thistles!'.



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Issue 995 (4 August 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 44, 47.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Hospitals, Government

Institutions mentioned:

St Bartholomew's Hospital St Bartholomew's Hospital
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Punch,  39 (1860), 47.

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We Ought to be Careful

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Accidents


    Draws attention to a 'new book' by Forbes B Winslow Winslow, Forbes Benignus (1810–74) ODNB
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(probably Winslow 1860 Winslow, Forbes Benignus 1860. On Obscure Diseases of the Brain, and Disorders of the Mind: Their Incipient Symptoms, Pathology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prophylaxis, London: John Churchill
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) which presents cases of the 'beneficial results of accidents', in particular that of an 'Idiot' who, after receiving 'a violent blow on the head, became a practising Barrister'. Adds that Mr Punch is now going to be 'very careful' about indulging in 'his favourite practise of giving idiots a rap on the head'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 50.

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Accidents and Offences

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Narcotics, Crime, Medical Practitioners, Measurement


    Discusses a case of a 'poor young man' who was indicted for killing his mother after he mistakenly gave her an overdose of 'hydrocyanic acid' that she was taking to relieve her sickness. Insists that there was no proof that he had 'given an excessive dose' and is adamant that this is a case of 'culpable negligence'. Goes on to question why members of the court found it so amusing to hear a discussion between the judge and a surgeon witness about the difference between a 'minim' and 'drop' measures of prussic acid.



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Issue 996 (11 August 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 52.

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Restorative in Slumber

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Magnetism, Invention


    Discusses the 'patent magnetic brushes and combs'. Explains that there is a magnet 'enclosed within the back of the brush', which is supposed to treat greying and thinning hair and other symptoms, including headaches. Adds that the brush works by leeching the oxide of iron out of the blood and drawing it into grey hair, which is deficient in iron. Ridicules this idea by suggesting that readers try to attract black hairs with a magnet. Following the success of the 'magnetic brush', suggests the 'magnetic nightcap', consisting of a network of 'magnetic steel wire' which gives the wearer all-night exposure to the magnetic fluid. Stresses the need to keep the cap in a iron casket during the day to prevent the loss of magnetism. Boasts that symptoms such as headache and neuralgia are better treated with the cap than the brush, and that the cap is accordingly 'invaluable to the gourmand and votary of Bacchus'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 53.

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The Spiritual 'Hume'-Bug

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [H R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Experiment, Light, Instruments, Belief, Proof


    Incorporating into his title the name of the notorious medium, Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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, the author denies the claim of 'Giles Scroggins's Journal, or the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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' that 'alleged spiritual manifestations' are real. Reports that one of Mr Punch's reliable friends attended a séance given by a 'low American' and by two female mediums, the latter being deemed 'rank impostors'. Denies the Spiritual Magazine's claim that Mr Punch is 'impugning what he knows to be the truth'. Insisting that the spiritualist periodical 'may believe that it believes in [spirit manifestations] when it really only wishes to believe them', argues that 'Spiritualists [...] do not seem to know what scientific demonstration is' because 'if they knew, they would not expect their miracles to be believed by any but the most ignorant of the vulgar [...] until performed before competent observers, and subjected [...] to the test of crucial experiment'. The illustration shows a wizard peering through a telescope at the hub of a stone wheel, evidently from a windmill near the top of the picture.



Punch,  39 (1860), 57.

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No Bulwarks for Ever!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Commerce


    Discusses John Bright's Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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criticism of the government's proposal to fortify English dockyards, criticism founded on Joseph Whitworth's Whitworth, Sir Joseph, 1st Baronet (1803–87) ODNB
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guarantee that he can fire a shell six miles. Punch agrees that it would be pointless fortifying arsenals with 'defences that some shell may explode next year', but stresses that should a new shell not be invented, then the dockyards will be at risk by being unfortified. Likens Bright's argument to that of not washing your hands because they will be 'dirty again' tomorrow.



Punch,  39 (1860), 59.

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The Blockade of the Season

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Phrenology, Politics


Punch,  39 (1860), 59.

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The Diggings of Suez

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Transport, Commerce

People mentioned:

Ferdinand, vicomte de Lesseps Lesseps, Ferdinand, vicomte de (1805–94) CBD
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Institutions mentioned:

Suez Canal Company Suez Canal Company
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Punch,  39 (1860), 60.

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[Domestic Disturbance Caused by Levitating Furniture]

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Domestic Economy


    Shows a housemaid standing in a drawing room, in which a table, a broom, dust-pan, and gloves, levitate above the floor. The caption notes how the housemaid is now greeted by a table that plays an accordion and wants to shake hands. Punch emphasizes that these feats, the stock phenomena of domestic spiritualist séances, can now happen in broad daylight.



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Issue 997 (18 August 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 61.

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Multum in Parvo

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy

Publications cited:

Morrison 1860 Morrison, Richard James 1860. Astronomy in a Nutshell; or, The Leading Problems of the Solar System Solved by Simple Proportion Only, on the Theory of Magnetic Attraction, London: [n. pub.]
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Punch,  39 (1860), 62.

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Natural and Supernatural

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism

See also:

[Robert Bell], 'Stranger than Fiction', Cornhill Magazine, 2 (1860), 211–24


Punch,  39 (1860), 63.

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Home, Great Home!

Anon

Genre:

Song, Satire

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Proof, Miracles, Belief


    Deeming Daniel D Home's Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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'flying exploits' to have outdone those of Robert Paltock's Paltock, Robert (1697–1767) ODNB
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fictional character Peter Wilkins, this song describes some of the dubious feats performed by the medium, ending with the verse 'HOME, HOME, great HOME—/ There's no case like HOME'. Among the phenomena described are his 'lift from the spirits', a self-playing accordion, and dancing tables, but the writer also emphasizes the suspicious circumstances under which these phenomena are produced. For example, notes that the accordion will only play 'if you won't look too hard at the works hid within', that 'you musn't peep under the [séance] table', and that the phenomena only occur in the house of Home's friend. Concludes by noting that people will regard spirits as signalling the 'new age of miracles [...] if only they'll consent to be kept in the dark'. The illustration shows a woman with a goose's face (to signify her credulity), being crowned with a wreath carried by spirit hands.


See also:

[Robert Bell], 'Stranger than Fiction', Cornhill Magazine, 2 (1860), 211–24


Punch,  39 (1860), 63.

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A Protestant Panic

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Politics, Government


    Considers the appointment of the Roman Catholic, Mr Turnbull Turnbull, Mr (fl. 1860) PU1/39/7/4
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, to the office of 'Calenderer of Foreign Parts in the State Paper Office' to be 'the most astounding phenomenon Mr Punch has witnessed since DONATI's Donati, Giovan Battista (1826–73) DSB
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comet'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 64.

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The Two Sick Men

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Politics


    Describes the illnesses of Sultan Abd-ul-Medjid Abd-ul-Medjid, Sultan of Turkey (1823–61) CBD
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of Turkey and Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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who are being treated by the same French doctor (Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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) who tells his patients that 'both must be bled, / And take more steel, by which he swears, / Exhibited with lead'. The pope and sultan agree that neither the medicine nor the doctor will help them, and Punch ends by hoping that they could both 'break up quietly, / And leave the world in peace'. The poem is an allegory reflecting the dire situations of the Vatican and the Ottoman Empire, and Napoleon's involvement in both.



Punch,  39 (1860), [65].

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The Two Sick Men

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Politics


    Following Anon, 'Another Rap at the Rappers', Punch, 39 (1860), 90, depicts Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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as a military doctor who spoons gruel to Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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and Sultan Abd-ul-Medjid Abd-ul-Medjid, Sultan of Turkey (1823–61) CBD
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of the Ottoman Empire, both of whom are represented as sick patients sitting on easy chairs. The pope tells the sultan that they share the same 'French Doctor' whose 'course of steel' has not been particularly effective.



Punch,  39 (1860), 68–69.

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Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XXVII—Three Words More About the Reign of King Edward the Third  [27/42]Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XIX—Contains More About the Knights in the Days of Richard the First and John', Punch, 38 (1860), 240
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIII—All About Arms and Armour', Punch, 39 (1860), 28–29
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIV—The Reigns of Edward the First and Edward the Second', Punch, 39 (1860), 38–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXXIV—The Time of Henry the Sixth', Punch, 39 (1860), 168
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XL—Should be Read by all Tragedians Before they Dress for Richard III', Punch, 39 (1860), 238–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XLI—Bids Adieu to Henry the Seventh and Au Revior to Henry the Fourth', Punch, 39 (1860), 248–49

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Essay, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [3]

Subjects:

Military Technology, War


    Discusses the types of armour used during the reign of King Edward III Edward III, King of England and Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine (1312–77) ODNB
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, notably the increasing use of iron plate in making the armour worn by soldiers. Draws attention to the use of spiked gauntlets and to the first use of cannon (in the Battle of Crécy, 1346), a weapon that 'would now be thought mere popguns' and 'very weak compared with Armstrong's Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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'. Adds that when these early cannons burst, they 'often caused more damage to their own side than the enemy', and that the Battle of Crécy was won by the superior skill of the English archers. (68) Illustrations show the armour worn by 'William of Wimbledon', the gauntlet of 'Sir Thomas de la Marche', and an artilleryman igniting a cannon during the time of Edward III.



Punch,  39 (1860), 69.

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Supernatural Philosophers

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Miracle, Display, Religion


Punch,  39 (1860), 69.

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A Vicarious Crack

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Government


    Following the claim in the new Report from the Select Committee on Lunatics Report from the Select Committee on Lunatics: Report from the Select Committee on Lunatics, Together with the Proceedings of the Committee, Minutes of Evidence, and Appendix, House of Commons Parliamentary Papers, Session 1860 (495), 22, ???–???
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that one in every 600 persons 'is cracked', seeks the cracked proportion amongst the 654 members of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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.



Punch,  39 (1860), 69.

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Great Case of Table-Turning

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Politics


Punch,  39 (1860), 70.

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Hume's Historical Antecedents

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Miracle, Supernaturalism, Language


    Argues that the confusion between Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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and David Hume Hume, David (1711–76) DSB
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'probably originated in the miracle-mongering gentleman's connection with RAP[P]IN'—a punning reference to the 'spirit-rapping' phenomena produced by Home and to the French historian and contemporary of Hume, Paul de Rapin Rapin, Paul de (1661–1725) ODNB
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.



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Issue 998 (25 August 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 72–73.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Government, Spiritualism


    Discusses a House of Commons House of Commons
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debate on a 'Bill imposing New Duties on Spirits', which it suggests that Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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and 'other Mediums' would 'do well to peruse' (72).



Punch,  39 (1860), 73.

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Spirit Conjuring

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Machinery, Proof


    Describes the existence of some 'unfashionable' people who regard 'the so-called "manifestations" of MR. HOME Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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and other Spirit-rappers' to be 'merely the machinations of a conjuror', but thinks that this not a 'fair' opinion. Emphasizes the dubious conditions under which the 'spirit tricksters [...] do their chief tricks' including darkness, the presence of believers, and the exclusion of 'Sceptics like Mr. Punch'. Draws attention to spiritualists' fear of having their 'clumsy machinery' detected and denies that mediums can be likened to conjurors such as Robert Houdin Houdin, Robert (1805–71) CBD
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, Ludwig Döbler Döbler, Ludwig (1801–64) WBI
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, and Wiljalba Frikell Frikell, Wiljalba (1818–1903) RLIN
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.



Punch,  39 (1860), 73.

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Worth a Rap and Sometimes More

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Commerce


Punch,  39 (1860), 74.

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A Spirit Drawing. By Our Own Medium

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Satire

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Mechanics, Music


    Shows a drawing room in which disembodied white 'spirit' hands have attached themselves to various objects and have animated them: for example, a bottle plays a piano using 'spirit' hands, disembodied hands dance with chairs, play musical instruments, and turn the piano music.



Punch,  39 (1860), 77.

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Singular if True (An Extract from the Note-book of a Spiritualist Enthusiast)

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Miracle, Cultural Geography, Progress, Belief

People mentioned:

James E Tennent Tennent, Sir James Emerson, 1st Baronet (1804–69) ODNB
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    Opens by anticipating ridicule for the 'fearfully appalling facts' which the author is about to describe, facts which 'sceptics will regard as merely optical delusions' and therefore as inconsequential. Attacks scepticism as 'the common characteristic of the English people' and those 'too lazy to submit to be converted' by 'savans and philosophers' whom the public regard as 'charlatans and quacks' but who have detected 'novel wonders'. Confesses to believing in 'all the mysteries of spirit-rapping' and the 'science' of table-turning, and that, since coming to 'years of gin-discretion', he has had 'almost daily acquaintance with spirits'. Proceeds to relate an account of his 'last spiritual intercourse' in which he described how a dead bloater that he was about to eat, suddenly wagged its tail under the apparent influence of spirits. Having asked his friend to act as his medium with the fish, the fish raised itself up on its tail, told its life story, and then sang. Ends by denying his friend's accusation that he was suffering from an earlier debauch and from hallucination. The illustration shows a man starting at a dinner plate, above which floats a speaking fish.



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Issue 999 (1 September 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 83.

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A Spirited Attack: By a Strong-Minded Assailant

Sophonisba Smith Smith, Sophonisba
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Faith, Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Charlatanry, Belief


    Expresses no surprise at Mr Punch's scepticism towards 'the mysteries of Spirit-rapping', but attacks him for adopting a position of 'lazy disbelief' towards spiritualism, for turning 'a deaf ear to the truths which are rapped out of our tables', and for regarding the raising of a 'spiritual enthusiast' to the ceiling as the 'height of imposition'. Admits that Mr Punch does not cram his scepticism 'down the public throat', because in articles describing the 'spirit-conversation of the Bloater and the Rapper' (see Audi Alteram Partem, ''Is There any Sperrits Present?'', Punch, 39 (1860), 101–02), he gave readers 'some knowledge of the wonders that are working, and gave them a fair chance of conversion to our faith'. Attempts to convince Mr Punch that the fish in the article can talk, sing, fly, and swim. In support of these claims, the author refers to the recently deceased 'Talking Fish', and the testimony of James E Tennent Tennent, Sir James Emerson, 1st Baronet (1804–69) ODNB
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(also a noted séance-goer) and Dr Adams Adams, Dr (fl. 1860) PU1/39/9/1
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in favour of singing fish. She considers this testimony by 'naturalists' to be 'quite as strange as the tales of the supernaturalists'. Questions why Mr Punch believes in the singing fish of Ceylon reported by these naturalists, but not those in England, adding that William Shakespeare Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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supported the existence of the fish by speaking of 'calling spirits from the "vasty deep"'. Concludes by telling Mr Punch that if he persists in doubting whether a 'herring can be heard by a person who is under the influence of spirits' then she will box his ears.



Punch,  39 (1860), 84.

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The Warning of the Whitebait

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Spiritualism, Commerce, Magic


Punch,  39 (1860), 87.

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A Song by a Sable Sceptic

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Miracle, Race


    This song, written from the perspective of a black person, is a response to the spiritualistic feats of Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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. He reveals how he learnt 'de dodge' of teaching the table to 'jump Jim Crow' by moving 'de knee beneath', and that 'De spirit-hand' is made of 'Of wax or wood [...] And by phosph'rus light displayed'. Expresses grave reservations about the medium's alleged 'floatin' in de air', especially because witnesses 'dowse de gas' and observe the phenomenon in the darkness. Concludes by anticipating that if a child were to take a 'spirit lamp' to the 'Spirit-movin' sight' he would cast 'some light upon de subject'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 88.

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Latest from New York

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Gender

Institutions mentioned:

SS Great Eastern SS Great Eastern
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Punch,  39 (1860), 90.

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Another Rap at the Rappers

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Language, Commerce


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1000 (8 September 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 89–90.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Government

People mentioned:

William G Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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Punch,  39 (1860), 92.

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Men Who Have Helped Themselves

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Human Development, Education, Progress, Engineers

People mentioned:

George Stephenson Stephenson, George (1781–1848) ODNB
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Publications cited:

Smiles 1859 Smiles, Samuel 1859. Self-Help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct, London: John Murray
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Punch,  39 (1860), 93.

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Harbouring Mystery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Engineering, Technology, Commerce, Nutrition, Analogy


    Speculates on the uses of a 'gridiron' which is being prepared for the reception of the SS Great Eastern SS Great Eastern
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. Plays on the culinary meaning of the word: for example, hopes that the ship will not be 'hauled over the coals again' and thinks it might be used to give shareholders of the enterprise a chance to see 'their stake slowly done'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 93.

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The Theatrical Census of Europe

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Statistics, Amusement, Mathematics, Machinery, Music


    Argues that England has so many actors that 'MR. BABBAGE's Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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calculating machine would certainly be brought to a stand-still, as effectually as though an Italian organ-grinder was standing away outside, if called upon to give an account of them all'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 94.

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Garibaldi's Asses

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Heat, Physics


Punch,  39 (1860), 94.

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Mechi in the Literary Field

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Agriculture, Horticulture, Commerce


    Announces that following the publication of Jerrold 1860 Jerrold, Thomas Serle 1860. The Garden that Paid the Rent, 3rd edn, London: Chapman & Hall
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, Coulton 1859 Coulton, Miss 1859. Our Farm of Four Acres and the Money we Made By it, 6th edn, London: Chapman and Hall
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, and Coulton 1860 Coulton, Miss 1860. From Hay-Time to Hopping, London: Chapman and Hall
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, the agriculturalist John J Mechi Mechi, John Joseph (1802–80) ODNB
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is to publish 'an agricultural treatise entitled, From Crops to Strops'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 99.

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The Terrors of Table Turning

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Domestic Economy, Mental Illness, Psychology, Mechanics, Observation


    Argues that, given the extraordinary movements of furniture caused by spirits, 'great pains should be taken to avoid the chance of accidents resulting from its [i.e. furniture] getting into an excited state'. Noting the observations of 'living witnesses', who use their eyes but not their 'common sense [...] to test the "truths" to which they testify', expresses concern about the effect of leaving a family in the presence of 'strange furniture'. To secure the 'peace of mind of parents', suggests that furniture dealers will have to make sure their wares are 'warranted as sound and safe from spirits'. Adds that 'while the Spirit mania lasts', precautions will also have to be taken with bedroom furniture which will also need to be certified as free from spirits.



Punch,  39 (1860), 99.

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A Profitable Line of Business

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Commerce, Accidents


    Laments a report revealing that a 'certain Railway company' pays its lawyers an extortionate salary. Notes that owing to 'the numerous Railway collisions', railways are 'always running to law' and have been more profitable to lawyers than engineers. Proceeds to attack the way in which a lawyer's financial interest in a railway line continues long after 'the Engineer finished his line'. Concludes by contending that 'Railways were established in this country for the special emolument of Lawyers and Directors'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 100.

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Dwarfs and Giants

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Supernaturalism


Punch,  39 (1860), 100.

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The Vatican at Leicester Square

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Display, Physical Geography, Religion


    Reports that the Wyld's Great Globe Wyld's Great Globe, Leicester Square
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might be converted into a palace for Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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.



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Issue 1001 (15 September 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 101–02.

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'Is There any Sperrits Present?'

Audi Alteram Partem Partem, Audi Alteram
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Steamships, Progress, Belief


    Draws attention to the abuse which Mr Punch has received in the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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for 'deriding and denying the wonderful facts of Spiritualism!'. Notes that the conflict between the 'Spiritualist and the Scoffer' was anticipated in the nursery rhyme, 'High diddle diddle'. Insists that the rhyme is a 'covert' attack on spiritualism: for example, it interprets 'The Cat and the Fiddle, / The Cow jumped over the Moon' as 'ribaldry' meaning: 'the alleged fact of spirit-fiddling is as improbable as the legendary relation that a certain ruminant quadruped overleapt the satellite of this planet'. Concludes by assuring Mr Punch that he 'will live to believe in Spiritualism [...] as DR. LARDNER Lardner, Dionysius (1793–1859) ODNB
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lived to see the Atlantic crossed by steamers'. (101)



Punch,  39 (1860), 103.

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A Colossal Bore

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Transport, Efficiency


    Discusses the slow progress made by Ferdinand, vicomte de Lesseps Lesseps, Ferdinand, vicomte de (1805–94) CBD
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in his construction of the Suez Canal Suez Canal
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, the slow rate being all the more difficult to comprehend since a large boring machine is being used. Wishes Lesseps would 'bore quietly' and 'not disturb the peace of Europe as though all the mountains in the world were in labour', and describes the opinion of Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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that the canal should be 'Cut'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 107.

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De Mortius Nil Nisi Bonum

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Heroism, Navigation, Discovery


    Discusses the attempt by some descendants of James Cook Cook, James (1728–79) DSB
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to raise money for a monument to 'that distinguished man'. Argues that Cook needs no monument since every inhabitant and animal in the South Sea islands 'is a figure in COOK's monument', and any other monument will 'fall far below this'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 107.

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The Travelling Season

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Politics


    Describes the change of air recommended to the King Ferdinand II Ferdinand II, King of the Two Sicilies (1810–59) CBD
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of the Two Sicilies by his physician Giuseppe Garibaldi Garibaldi, Giuseppe (1807–82) CBD
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, who felt that the 'atmosphere of Naples' was too oppressive for the monarch's 'feeble constitution'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 107.

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Homebug or Humebug

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Disease, Morality


    Thinks the 'Spirit-rapping mania may be a moral disease' but may possess a 'material aspect' insofar as it 'may be considered as a species of imposthume'—an allusion to the medium Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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.



Punch,  39 (1860), 107.

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Double Memory

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Psychology, Human Development, Gender


    Discusses a report in Once a Week Once a Week (1859–80) Waterloo Directory
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of a 'young lady' afflicted with 'A Double Memory': a 'two-fold state' in which the sufferer was 'as ignorant as a Member of Parliament' one day, and extremely 'accomplished' the next. Thinks this state of being 'alternately a child and a lady' has 'certain advantages', insofar as it allows people to fancy themselves as children and to forget their debts.



Punch,  39 (1860), 110.

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Chinese Worsted

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment


Punch,  39 (1860), 110.

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Polite, But True

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Agriculture, Invention, Technology


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Issue 1002 (22 September 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 111.

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Porter on Political Atoms

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Matter Theory, Homeopathy, Politics


    Discusses Whitworth Porter's Porter, Whitworth (1827–92) ODNB
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claim that Lord John Russell's Russell, Lord John, 1st Earl Russell (1792–1878) ODNB
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Reform Bill was 'an atom of a bill from an atom of a statesman' which could open the 'flood-gates' of franchise reform. Questioning how an atom could open flood-gates, Punch wonders if Porter is a 'disciple' of the homeopath Christian F Hahnemann Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel (1755–1843) DSB
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.



Punch,  39 (1860), 111.

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The World Knows Nothing of its Greatest Men

Anon

Genre:

Extract, Essay, Spoof

Subjects:

Invention, Physiology


    Purportedly a quotation from George Cruikshank Cruikshank, George (1792–1878) ODNB
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, the author considers the inventor of the corkscrew was 'almost as great a man' as William Harvey Harvey, William (1578–1657) DSB
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, because while the latter 'discovered the circulation of the blood', the former promoted the 'circulation of the bottle'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 112.

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Mr John Thomas at a Spirit Soirée

John Tomas of Belgravy Tomas, John (of Belgravy)
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry


    Addressed to the well-known Punch character, Jeames, the fictional letter writer complains about the dullness of London 'out of season' and reports that in trying to find 'how the time to parse away', he and his friends have 'turned' to 'Table-Turnin'. Explains that during one spirit 'swarry' in his 'privit room', the table 'mysteerously did move', although 'it might are seemed mysteerius if adn't give a shove'. The 'Mejum' then asked the question 'His theer any speerits present', which was followed by 'a rappin' and the 'Sperrit' of the narrator's 'Great Grandma' who 'didn't no er name', refused to say where she lived, and wrongly said her son (the author) was dead. Later the spirit gave another false piece of information, which caused the table to rise, a phenomenon which the medium attributed to angry spirits, but which a boy at the séance linked to the 'shovin and pushink' of the medium. Later in the séance, the spirits agreed to 'shake ands' only if the lights were extinguished, which the author used as an opportunity to kiss his beloved Jane. Concludes by reflecting on the 'spiritmovin game' as a means of 'kissink'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 113.

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Music and Mathematics

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Music, Crime, Mental Illness, Mathematics


    After discussing the problem of street musicians, especially on people with 'fine minds' who also have 'fine nerves', discusses the deleterious effect of such musicians on the progress of writers, and then turns to Charles Babbage Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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, who has wasted much of his life suffering from these 'miscreants'. Discusses the recent legal case concerning Babbage and street musicians, which centred on the claim that Babbage's neighbours had been encouraging them to play under his windows. Imagines the pain which this must have caused Babbage, the 'Enraged Mathematician', but notes that what is 'play' to his tormentors is 'death to his desk labours'. Believing that for men like Babbage, 'time [...] is money', then those who steal his time should be punished for theft. Adds that his tormentors should be condemned to solitary confinement where they will suffer the sounds of their own instruments.



Punch,  39 (1860), 113.

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Sudorific Popery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Miracle, Supernaturalism, Religious Authority


    Discusses an attempt by a 'Roman Catholic Priest' to produce the miracle of the 'sweating' of a picture 'meant for the Virgin', a 'hoax' which the author hopes will be exposed, as well at the bleeding statue of St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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.



Punch,  39 (1860), 114.

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The Saint and the Hero

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Miracle, Supernaturalism, Physiology, Religious Authority, Politics, Nationalism


    Urges the 'holy knaves' who 'knelt' in 'stupid adoration' of the alleged bleeding of the statue of St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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, whose 'simulated gore' wrongly 'melts when hot, congeals when cold', to 'behold' a 'great miracle'—that of Giuseppe Garibaldi's Garibaldi, Giuseppe (1807–82) CBD
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restoration of 'Liberty' to Italy, a country which has suffered 'blood and tears', but which now bleeds and weeps for joy.



Punch,  39 (1860), 114.

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Geometry of the Fashionable World

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics


Punch,  39 (1860), [115].

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The Hero and the Saint

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Miracle, Supernaturalism, Religious Authority, Politics


    In conjunction with Anon, 'The Saint and the Hero', Punch, 39 (1860), 114, this illustration depicts a frightened-looking monk carrying two allegedly miraculous artefacts—a bottle containing the blood of St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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and a 'Winking Picture'—but who, in obedience to Giuseppe Garibaldi Garibaldi, Giuseppe (1807–82) CBD
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(who stands behind him), is stepping off the edge of a cliff.



Punch,  39 (1860), 117.

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Logic for Ladies. By One of Them

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Reason, Gender, Domestic Economy, Education, Reasoning


    Insisting that 'Ladies ought to be fine logicians' since they have 'a perfect mastery over the premises', the female author explains that 'Logic teaches us to train our mental faculties', thus enabling us to 'draw from safe premises a safe conclusion'. Divides 'mental operations' into 'simple apprehension, judgment, and discourse or reasoning', each of which the author illustrates with the example of a gentleman's hat becoming entrapped in a lady's hoop. Stresses that all arguments are reducible to a syllogism, which she illustrates with the example of a conflict between a husband and wife over the former's habit of smoking cigars. Other dubious examples include, 'All men are heartless. / A Parrot is not a Man. / A Parrot, therefore, is not heartless'. Goes on to give domestic and equally questionable illustrations of 'Reasoning in a circle', 'suppressio veri', and 'suggestio falsi'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 117.

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Father Tom's Hint to St Januarius

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Miracle, Supernaturalism, Chemistry, Experiment, Physiology, Religious Authority, Religion, Faith, Heterodoxy


    Written from the perspective of an Irish Catholic priest, who warns St Bridget Birgitta, Saint (1303–73) CBD
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that the 'Holy Church look mighty solemn and sarious' owing to The Times's The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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suggestion of putting a 'phial' of St Januarius's Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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blood 'on chemical trial'—a test, prompted by the alleged liquefaction of the blood of the saint on 19 September 1860, which the author considers a 'haythin iniquity'. Insists that the Roman Catholic Church wants to show 'it own' the 'clot turnin' liquid, widout foire to melt it', but that 'the miracle wanted to make sinners daunted, / Is the clot's keepin' hard, till their hard hearts have felt it'. Thinks that those 'heretics' who believe that the blood melts only because the 'priest's hand warms the phial' should be left to 'prache' and protests that 'our Saints won't have heretics put 'em on trial'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 118–19.

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Language of Flowers

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Dialogue, Spoof

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour


Punch,  39 (1860), 120.

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Gogs and Magogs

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Heroism, Exploration, Representation


    Relishes the government's decision to refuse to provide metal for a proposed statue to the memory of John Franklin Franklin, Sir John (1786–1847) ODNB
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, who has already 'made for himself' a 'monument more durable than brass'. Uses this as a basis for a detailed attack on modern statues, which the writer considers a 'disgrace and an insult' to the heroes and statesmen that they celebrate. Draws attention to the inability of contemporary sculptors to represent modern garments and criticises the fact that post-classical figures never look 'statuesque'. Points out that although Franklin was a 'gallant commander', he was also 'a stout middle-aged man' whose statue would be 'a grievous eyesore'.



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Issue 1003 (29 September 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 123.

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The Gunner's Rule of Thumb

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Scientific Practitioners, Accidents


    Discussing a report that sailors 'have had their thumbs blown off' after using them to stop the vent in a cannon, urges that 'some scientific engineer' should be invited to devise a use for the vent.



Punch,  39 (1860), 122.

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New Horse-Doctrine

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Veterinary Science

Publications cited:

Moore 1857 Moore, James 1857. Outlines of Veterinary Homeopathy: Comprising Horse, Cow, Dog, Sheep, and Hog Diseases, and their Treatment, Manchester: Henry Turner
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Punch,  39 (1860), 123.

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The Art of Correspondence

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics, Language, Gender


    Contends that 'A woman's letter is best expressed by the algebraical "x", for it's a letter that always denotes an unknown quantity'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 124.

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Lying by Lightning

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Technology, Error, Charlatanry


    Reporting the inaccuracy of the telegram announcing the death of Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France, considers 'electric wires' to 'tell such stories, that any astounding message transmitted by them will soon come to be called an electric Tell-a-cram'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 130.

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A Glass that will not bear the Morning's Reflection

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Light, Technology, Commerce


    Discusses the case of 'a poor American' who 'patented a glass in which a man can see himself as plainly as others can see him', but because nobody looking in the glass recognized his own image, the inventor failed to sell a 'single specimen'. Adds that the inventor is now trying to invent a 'glass that flatters', an invention with which he hopes to 'realise a considerable fortune'.



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Issue 1004 (6 October 1860)Expand    Contract

No Articles Indexed

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Issue 1005 (13 October 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 141.

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Spiritual Hat-Moving

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Cultural Geography, Periodicals


    Notes the 'silly' stories about the 'DAVENPORT boys' (a reference to the brothers William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, who were both mediums) 'copied' from 'the Yankee organ of Spiritualism', the Herald of Progress Spiritual Telegraph (1852–60) Herald of Progress (1860–64) BUCOP
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, by the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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. Proceeds to discuss the 'Hat-moving' phenomenon—the request for subscriptions—exhibited by the latter periodical. Denies wishing to damage the 'pecuniary interests' of the Spiritual Magazine, and argues that, if quoting the journal's request for subscriptions adds to its circulation, Punch will have 'rendered a small service to struggling writers of fiction'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 144.

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A Michaelmas Goose Cooked

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Periodicals, Reason, Charlatanry


    Discusses an argument made in the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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that it is 'pleased to have Punch as an enemy rather than as a friend, for he is doing good to the cause by making it more extensively known'. Believes this illustrates that the 'Spiritualist mind [...] does not reason', and points out that if Punch did support 'such humbugs as the Spiritualists [...] his circulation and his character would be injured'. Agrees with the Spiritual Magazine that Punch has helped the 'Spiritualist cause' by exposing 'the trickery by which it is supported'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 149.

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The A. B. C. of Spiritualism

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Ethics, Faith, Morality, Mental Illness, Philosophy

Publications cited:

Banner of Light Banner of Light (1857–1900+) RLIN
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    Arguing that spiritualists 'might have many more disciples—or shall we call them dupes?—if they did not themselves take such pains to repel them', turns to one of spiritualism's 'simpletons', Asaph B Child Child, Asaph Bermis (1813–79) RLIN
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, whose book (Child 1860 Child, Asaph Bernius 1860. Whatever is, is Right, Boston: Berry, Colby and Company
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) Punch attacks. The author maintains that the title of the work affirms 'that a liar is a natural necessity' and accordingly shows why 'no Spiritualist would shrink from trickery and fraud in order to encourage a belief in a false faith'. Considers Child's claim that, in spiritualist ethics, 'Murder has no influence upon the soul', to be contrary to the Bible and also 'insane'. Expresses no surprise at Child's apparent claim that intuition, rather than philosophy or 'external teachings', make a spiritualist (which prompts Punch to note that no philosophers, 'from PLATO Plato (428–348/7 BC) DSB
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down to Mr. Punch', became spiritualists). Concludes by wondering how far Child's dubious system of ethics can be reconciled with a writer in the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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who claimed that spiritualism is an 'influence' that can 'raise man, body, mind and soul' to a position higher than that of the poet.



Punch,  39 (1860), 149.

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Heartless Jest

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Psychology, Physiology, Human Development

Publications cited:

Bain 1859 Bain, Alexander 1859. The Emotions and the Will, London: John W. Parker and Son
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Issue 1006 (20 October 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 154.

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True in the End

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Medical Treatment


Punch,  39 (1860), 154.

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Bedcandle Philosophy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Light, Invention, Reading, Disease, Gender


    Thinks an advertisement for bed-candles made 'to burn half an hour only' was intended to stop 'young ladies of a sentimental turn' spending 'half the night' performing such 'silly suspirations' as combing their hair and 'reading trash in bed', which Punch thinks 'girls' are 'addicted' to and leads to 'dim eyes and pallid cheeks'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 158.

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Charity in Sport and Earnest

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Hospitals, Patronage


    Discusses Joseph Bond's Bond, Joseph (fl. 1888) WBI
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proposal that 'ten per cent upon the Derby and Oaks Stakes at Epsom should be annually divided among six of the London Hospitals'. This discussion plays on the equestrian connotations of such terms as ''ospitals' and 'stable institutions'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 159.

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The End of the Sea-Side Season

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Hospitals, Disease, Animal Behaviour


    Presents a report from its 'Ramsgate Correspondent' who describes the desertion of the seaside town, and observes that the few remaining visitors 'move about with all the air of melancholy maniacs' and 'run the risk of being carried off to private madhouses, and clapped in strait waistcoats'. Adding to the sense of desertion are the flies that have 'flown away, or else are hibernating in the back slums' and the riding horses that have 'returned to their normal occupations [...] drawing bakers' carts, or working in a circus'. Concludes by noting that some cats are the 'only beasts of prey left preyable'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 160.

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The Tide of Fashion

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Animal Behaviour, Ornithology, Health


    Reports on the cleaner and more voluminous appearance of the 'Ornamental Water' in St James's Park St James's Park
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, a stretch of water inhabited by several healthy looking ducks and other aquatic birds.



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Issue 1007 (27 October 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 167.

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[Advertisement.] Spirit-Rapping Testimonials

Judaeus Apeller Apeller, Judaeus
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Adipose Glubb Glubb, Adipose
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Wilderness Lodge Lodge, Wilderness
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Mrs Mephosheth Barnes Barnes, Mrs Mephibosheth
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Margaret Snickle Snickle, Margaret
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Barnabas Toddlekins Toddlekins, Barnabas
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Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Medical Treatment, Belief, Mental Illness


    In a spoof advertisement, the 'Editor of the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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' presents testimonials in support of 'the famous Spirit-Rapping Ointment'. Judaeus Apeller reveals that applying the ointment, unlike swallowing the blood of St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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and the 'Winking Picture', cured him of 'incredulity' and enabled him to 'believe anything'. Adipose Glubb reports that he applied the ointment to a table that caused him to laugh and eventually fall asleep, an effect which has worked on the rest of his family. Mrs Mephibosheth Barnes reveals that the ointment has cured her son of 'any over-zeal in his studies', while Wilderness Lodge thanks the 'Editor of the Spiritual Magazine' for the ointment which he administered to his daughters who have consequently lost their troublesome interest in 'dances, operas, parties, stage-plays'. Margaret Sninckle warns of the dangers of excessive use of the ointment, following the physical pain suffered by her husband who became addicted to the ointment. Finally, Barnabas Toddlekins reports that the ointment has successfully driven his wife away.



Punch,  39 (1860), 168.

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Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXXIV—The Time of Henry the Sixth  [34/42]Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XIX—Contains More About the Knights in the Days of Richard the First and John', Punch, 38 (1860), 240
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIII—All About Arms and Armour', Punch, 39 (1860), 28–29
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIV—The Reigns of Edward the First and Edward the Second', Punch, 39 (1860), 38–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XXVII—Three Words More About the Reign of King Edward the Third', Punch, 39 (1860), 68–69
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XL—Should be Read by all Tragedians Before they Dress for Richard III', Punch, 39 (1860), 238–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XLI—Bids Adieu to Henry the Seventh and Au Revior to Henry the Fourth', Punch, 39 (1860), 248–49

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Essay, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [3]

Subjects:

Military Technology, War


    Describes the 'fanciful' armour worn by knights during the period of King Henry VI Henry VI, King of England and Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine (1421–71) ODNB
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, drawing attention to the defensive iron breast-plates and back-plates, aprons of chain-mail, the helmet with a newly-added 'bascinet or scull-cap', and 'a steel cap called a casquetel' on top of which is fixed a spike called a 'crenel'. Goes on to describe the use of spurs with extraordinarily long shanks, and of 'the hand-cannon or "gonne"', a weapon regarded as a distant ancestor of 'our exploded Brown Bess'. Attributes the merits of the 'gonne' to the Italians and goes on to explain its advantageous firing mechanism. Concludes by noting that the weapon was useful for 'human slaughter' and 'sportsmen'. The illustrations depict a suit of armour from the time of Henry VI, 'Military Shoes' with extraordinarily long spurs, and a figure struggling with the portable 'gonne' cannon.



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Issue 1008 (3 November 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 171.

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England's Iron Walls

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Poetry

Subjects:

Steamships, Military Technology, Engineers, War, Futurism

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Requests 'many other Men of War in Armour' besides the mail-clad HMS Warrior HMS Warrior
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. Lamenting the passing of the 'Wooden Walls of Old England' (wooden-hulled ships), notes that 'Ribs of steel are our ships, / Engineers are our men', and that 'steam frigates and rams' are now needed to compete with 'the French' whose 'iron-bound vessels' can 'very soon send a three-decker full of men to the bottom'. Anticipates a day when even these 'Ironside of the Ocean' will be superseded.



Punch,  39 (1860), 172.

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Seers of the Future

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Prognostication

People mentioned:

Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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    Noting the astonishing abilities of 'your Spiritualist' to see into the future, asks 'any sharp-sighted Spiritualist' when 'the Guards' Memorial (which has been going on from time immemorial) is likely to be completed'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 174.

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A Table of Contents

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Language


    Defines a 'Table of Contents' as 'A Table that answers to every rap of the Spiritualist' or 'moves according to the desires of the fools that are circled around it'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 177.

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A Prospect for Poison-Mongers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Narcotics, Medical Treatment, Adulteration, Government


    Praises Samuel Warren Warren, Samuel (1807–77) ODNB
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, the author of Warren 1832 Warren, Samuel 1832. Passages from the Diary of a Late Physician With Notes and Illustrations by the Editor, 2 vols, Edinburgh: W. Blackwood
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, for drawing attention to new legislation on poisoning in his 'address to the Grand Jury'. Warren pointed out that the parliamentary act will impose 'penal servitude or imprisonment' on anybody 'unlawfully and maliciously administering' poisons, legislation which Punch thinks should cause 'dealers in adulterated food' to be on their guard. Explains that if such people sell poisonous food they will be 'liable to an indictment for felony' or face a jury who may decide that they caused injury intentionally. Warns publicans and wine sellers of the same penalty.



Punch,  39 (1860), 179.

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A Lucid Explanation

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Materialism, Philosophy, Language


    Discusses an extract from 'a Yankee print' (probably an American spiritualist newspaper), which claims that since 'Greatness among man is alone a property of the sensuous world' and does not extend beyond the material world, then we have no right to claim that the spirits of great men should be 'a whit greater than the spirits of their washerwomen and scavengers'. Infers that the spirits of great men are illiterate because 'wisdom and good language are material possessions', but thinks this argument will only satisfy those who credit 'what Spiritualists state'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 179.

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A Stitch in Time

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Invention, Government, Cultural Geography, Patronage, War

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Notes that the only way of disabling such French vessels as La Gloire La Gloire, ship
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is to 'foul her screw'. Therefore expects the 'next invention in naval warfare' to be a 'Screw Fouler'. Wonders whether the Admiralty Admiralty
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will 'get the want supplied, or leave the French Marine to make another discovery involving one more "reconstruction of the Navy"'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 179.

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A Photograph whose Like was Never Seen

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Photography, Invention, Manufactories, Technology


    Discusses the invention by an American of a process for printing 12,000 photographs or stereographs in one hour.



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Issue 1009 (10 November 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 182.

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Unnatural Selection and Improvement of Species. (A Paper Intended to be Read at our Social Science Congress Social Science Congress
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by One who has been Spending Half-an-Hour or so with DARWIN Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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).

Anon

Genre:

Address, Drollery

Subjects:

Darwinism, Evolution, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Extinction


    This is the first article in Punch to deal directly with Charles Darwin and his theory of evolution by means of natural selection. Intended for an audience at the Social Science Congress, this spoof address opens by claiming that 'nine happy couples out of every ten are influenced' by 'the new Theory of Unnatural Selection', pointing out that what 'tends strongly to confirm our friend's [Darwin's] ingenious hypothesis', is the large number of mismatched couples. Examples of such mismatching and the principle of 'Like selects Unlike' include short husbands with tall wives. Insists that the 'fixed principle in nature' which is responsible for this is that men first make an apparently 'unnatural selection' of 'parties as dissimilar as can be to themselves', which propagate a 'Variety of species, both personal and mental'. Explains that 'philosophy and science both dispose us to contentment with our singly blessed state' and help us understand that mismatches may be more apparent than real. Warns that 'Natural Selection' does not necessarily lead to 'Improvement of Species' because, if people were 'unnaturally select in their selections' of partners, then 'the world would get so wise and good that there would really be little pleasure left in it'. 'Unnatural Selection', it adds, leads to folly which provides delight for those of 'refined and cultivated intellects', whilst natural selection would lead to the unpalatable result of the extinction of 'simpletons and snobs', and of Punch.



Punch,  39 (1860), 183.

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Type of the Medical Rogue

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Quackery, Commerce, Race


    Discusses a letter to the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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concerning a 'German Jew' who falsely represented himself as a surgeon to Giuseppe Garibaldi Garibaldi, Giuseppe (1807–82) CBD
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, but who lost the medical instruments entrusted to him. Focuses on the fact that, for libel reasons, the German's name was not given. Also argues that a 'nominal exposure' of a 'rogue' will not 'prevent him from setting up in London as an advertising quack'. Imagines how the quack would 'carry on a noisome and extortionate practice' under a false name. Concludes that it is 'useless as well as [...] dangerous, to denounce these blackguards personally', a group of people who can easily be distinguished from the 'decent and respectable part of mankind' by their eyes, noses, lips, and jewellery.



Punch,  39 (1860), 188.

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Sharks on the South Coast (A Study from St Harold's.) To Mr Punch

Anon

Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Zoology, Natural History, Exhibitions, Taxonomy, Adulteration


    Observes that sharks are not confined to tropical seas, and that visitors to south coast resorts can sometimes see dead specimens exhibited by fishermen when caught in the herring nets. Draws parallels between the sea shark and the 'land-shark', being the avaricious lodging house keeper. Reports that the sea shark he recently saw at the resort of St Harold's was a 'fine specimen of the Chondropterygian family', and a member of the 'Squalidae', and notes that the St Harold's land-shark is likewise 'eminently "squalid"'. Noting stories about the enormous appetites of sea-sharks, observes that the 'land-shark' has an 'extraordinary relish for condiments'. Thinks that unlike sea-sharks, with which it shares large jaws and 'an insatiable stomach', the 'land-shark' possesses a bill that suggests that it should be classified as the 'Ornithorhyncus paradoxus'. Notes that he had contemplated presenting readers with the 'bill' that he had 'extracted from my land-shark' but decided against it when he realised that 'every paterfamilias who has soujourned on the South Coast' could 'parallel' his specimen. Goes on to describe the adulterated food which he, 'a struggling paterfamilias', ate, owing to the fact that the lodging house was above a grocer's shop.



Punch,  39 (1860), 188.

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Sewerage and Salmon-Fishing

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Pollution, Sanitation, Zoology, Hunting

People mentioned:

Izaak Walton Walton, Izaak (1593–1683) DSB
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    Discusses an extract from an article describing the return of salmon to the River Thames, due to the 'partial purifying' of the river. Ponders the surprising connection between salmon and main drainage, but expresses delight that the Thames is being drained and anticipates a new interest in fishing.



Punch,  39 (1860), 189.

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Important Questions, Which any Spiritualist of Forty-Table Power would Oblige us Exceedingly by Answering

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Light, Invention, Publishing, Evolution


    Questions include whether the 'darkness' of the 'Dark Ages' was 'attributable to the non-invention of gas' and whether 'MR. JOHN COOPER' (possibly the actor John Cooper Cooper, John (1793–1870) ODNB
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) is the author of Chambers 1844 [Chambers, Robert] 1844. Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation, London: John Churchill
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.



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Issue 1010 (17 November 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 194.

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Dobler Outdone

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Nutrition, Spiritualism, Magic, Charlatanry, Technology


    Noting that tradesmen are taking 'leaves' out of the books of 'table-turners, and other conjurors and wizards', discusses an advertisement for a 'Patent Coffee Pot' that allegedly makes tea or coffee within a 'few minutes', simply by pouring water on an 'inverted lid'. Thinks that these coffee pots cannot be 'too widely known' and seeks to guarantee this by noting it in Punch. Concludes that it may 'influence the Government in their dealings with Chinamen to learn that tea can be made without the need of tea-leaves'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 200.

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A Rise in Bread-Stuffs!—Effects of Eating Aërated Bread

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Nutrition, Physiology, Pneumatics


    Shows 'Poor Cocker' and his family floating helplessly near the ceiling of their parlour, which, as the caption reveals, took place when they consumed 'Aërated Bread'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 200.

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Very Heavy Ordnance

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Political Economy


    Notes from the Mechanics' Magazine Mechanics' Magazine (1823–72) Iron: the Journal of Science, Metals, and Manufactures (1872–93) Industries and Iron (1893–99) Waterloo Directory
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that Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns have cost the country £2,000 each, which, according to Punch, means that 'We ought to be able to knock La Gloire La Gloire, ship
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into atoms with our two-thousand-pounders'.



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Issue 1011 (24 November 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 201.

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An Infallible Specific Against Sea-Sickness

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Disease


    'Never go to sea'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 209.

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Johnson for Ever

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation


    Shows an old man sitting at his desk by a window through which can be seen the moon. The man, surrounded by observational notebooks, looks at the moon through a table-top telescope, but a boy, who stands on the old man's chair, dangles a star-shaped object in front of the instrument.



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Issue 1012 (1 December 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 211.

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Oratorical Opium

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Narcotics, Disease, Mesmerism, Government


    Discusses news that 'a Deputation from the Anti-Opium Association Anti-Opium Association
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had an interview with MR. SAMUEL LANG Laing, Samuel (1812–97) ODNB
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', and requests the association to persuade the government to try to prevent 'drowsy discourses' by which statesmen 'induce on their mesmerised hearers a state of coma'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 211–12.

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Our Roving Correspondent

Jack Easel Easel, Jack
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Steam-power, Representation, Technology


    Describes the appearance in Westminster Abbey Westminster Abbey
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of an equestrian statue of King Richard I Richard I, King of England, Duke of Normandy and of Aquitaine, and Count of Anjou ('Richard Coeur de Lion') (1157–99) ODNB
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, which was hauled into the abbey by one of 'BRAY's Bray's Traction Engine Company
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traction engines'. This prompts the author to exclaim 'Bravo JAMES WATT Watt, James (1736–1819) DSB
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! Science and Art go hand in hand. Slowly and majestically they approach'. (212)



Punch,  39 (1860), 217.

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Turning-Points?

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Comparative Philology


    Notes that an 'action for damages' has been brought for 'turn-tables' supplied to a railway company. Admitting that it mistook this for the 'rotary instruments' of the 'Spirit-rappers', asks spiritualists whether King Arthur Arthur, real or legendary King of Britain (fl. in or before 6th century) ODNB
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and his knights 'were in the habit' of turning their tables, and whether they will allow table-turning to be called 'a round game' and 'Spirit-rapping, the rapacious sums that are rapped out of fools'—'cribbage'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 218.

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A Very Handsome Present

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoology, Observation


    Shows two men in a drawing room, one of whom has just opened a box containing a snake, whilst the other tells him to not 'injure the creature, as it's a very fine specimen of a full-grown lively viper'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 219.

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Question for Spirt-Rappers

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry


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Issue 1013 (8 December 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 223.

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Puppy Playgrounds

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Development, Health, Hospitals


    Noting a proposal by 'some ladies' to 'found a refuge for poor dogs', discusses an extract from the Western Times Western Times (1829–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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describing the establishment, by the wealthy Mark G K Rolle Rolle, Mark George Kerr (1835–1907) WBI
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, of some luxurious and well-equipped kennels for dogs. The extract reveals that the kennels have 'an hospital, granaries [...] an abundant supply of fresh-water at every point', playgrounds, and dwellings that 'are clean, warm, and well ventilated'. Expects readers to exclaim 'Happy dogs!' and praises Rolle for 'doing what no other man that we have ever heard of has ever done, or wished to do'. Anticipates that Rolle will establish similar facilities for his labourers.



Punch,  39 (1860), 227.

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The Baby in the House. By POVENTRY CATMORE, Author of 'Angel in the House', &c.,

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Human Development, Nutrition


    Includes a doctor's warm response to a new-born baby, a child that considered him 'jolly raw', but then the doctor 'viewed the crimson thing, / And listened to its doleful squeal, / And rather wished the nurse would bring / The pap-boat with its earliest meal'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 230.

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Wood Demon

A Praser Praser, A
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Belief


    Noting the existence of societies 'devoted to the mysteries of a séance', the author explains that he is an 'auctioneer and broker' of tables, and asks why 'a committee of brokers should not be called to give evidence as to their belief in the disposition of tables to turn', and thus to decide whether spirits 'affect tables above all other articles'. Hopes that the 'tables are turned' on the spiritualists if they 'don't give some satisfactory reason' for their beliefs. Warns that the 'matter is getting to be serious' because people are refusing to buy tables owing to their history of 'turning'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 231.

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Sir C. C.'s Last

Cresswell Cresswell Cresswell, Cresswell
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Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Time, Instruments, Technology, Accidents, Patronage


    Notes that 'what DENISON Beckett (formerly Beckett Denison), Sir Edmund, 1st Baron Grimthorpe (1816–1905) ODNB
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makes seems to turn out but ill: / There's a flaw in his bell, and a dent in his will'. The last line refers to his design of the now-cracked bell for the Houses of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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, 'Big Ben', and his inheritance of a large sum of money from the chronometer maker, Edward J Dent Dent, Edward John (1790–1853) ODNB
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.



Punch,  39 (1860), 239.

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Spirituel, and Spiritual

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Government


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Issue 1014 (15 December 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 233.

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A New Line of Art

Anon

Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Anatomy, Representation, Expertise, Charlatanry


    Criticises an advertisement in the Journal of the Society of Arts Journal of the Society of Arts (1852–76) Waterloo Directory
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from an artist whose name is fictionalized as 'BENJAMIN BOUNCE'. Questions the credibility of the artist, wondering 'under what physician, and in what dissecting-room' he obtained the 'scientific knowledge of external anatomy' that gives him 'confidence in soliciting patronage'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 238–39.

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Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XL—Should be Read by all Tragedians Before they Dress for Richard III  [40/42]Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XIX—Contains More About the Knights in the Days of Richard the First and John', Punch, 38 (1860), 240
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIII—All About Arms and Armour', Punch, 39 (1860), 28–29
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIV—The Reigns of Edward the First and Edward the Second', Punch, 39 (1860), 38–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XXVII—Three Words More About the Reign of King Edward the Third', Punch, 39 (1860), 68–69
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXXIV—The Time of Henry the Sixth', Punch, 39 (1860), 168
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XLI—Bids Adieu to Henry the Seventh and Au Revior to Henry the Fourth', Punch, 39 (1860), 248–49

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Anon

Genre:

Serial, Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War


    Regards the reign of King Richard III Richard III, King of England and Lord of Ireland (1452–85) ODNB
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as 'the climax of a period of slaughter', when such crude techniques as 'shooting, stabbing, spearing' and 'sticking' were used. Views the present age as 'having the advantage of appliances a million-fold more deadly' than the 'spears and swords, and the matchlocks of the fifteenth century'. Describes the 'extravagant' plate armour of Richard III's time, armour notable for its huge shoulder-plates and 'pointed elbow-pieces'. Later describes the continued use of the 'salade' helmet and 'steel sollerets' foot armour. (238)



Punch,  39 (1860), 239.

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A Ghost Story for Girls and Boys

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Supernaturalism, Reasoning, Mental Illness, Crime, Animal Behaviour, Psychology, Superstition


    Urges that, however 'sceptical we may be on the subject of ghosts', when an apparition is 'authenticated by evidence taken before a Magistrate', then the evidence must be given 'its due weight'. Discusses a legal case in which a ship's mate claims to have seen the 'human form' of a black steward on ship, eighteen days after he was believed to have fallen overboard and perished. Notes how other members of the crew (including the helmsman and a Newfoundland dog) were terrified by the sight. Suggests that such an occurrence might be explained by 'Indisposition' while 'mental contagion [...] would afford a possible, if not a satisfactory explanation of the transference of the mate's hallucination' to the helmsman. Dismissing the 'evidence of their senses', considers the astonishing reaction of the dog that apparently jumped overboard in terror for no reason—the steward had not perished but concealed himself in a 'bread-locker'. Punch thinks that this story 'casts great discredit on the evidence' of dogs. Notes that the steward had the impudence to summon the ship's captain to a police court in order to obtain his wages. Concludes by suspecting that the dog intuited the steward's impudent character and 'threw himself overboard in a paroxysm of canine madness'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 239.

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Pill-Making and Bill-Making

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Commerce, Medical Practitioners, Health


    Pondering the possibility that homeopathic doctors are 'homeopathic in their fees', favours visiting a homeopath rather than an allopath during any future illness, and thus avoiding the 'wondrously long bills' run up by doctors. Discusses a recent legal case revealing the extortionate fees charged by a surgeon for mere attendance, but excluding the cost of pills. Concludes that this makes 'one instinctively determined to do all within one's power to keep oneself in health'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 240.

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The Anatomy of Slavery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Race, Human Species, Anatomy, Politics, Medical Practitioners


    Puzzled by a paragraph in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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announcing a meeting of 'Southern [United States] medical students' in New York who resolved to return to the south because of Abraham Lincoln's Lincoln, Abraham (1809–65) CBD
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anti-slavery legislation. Urges that medical students 'Of all men in the world' should appreciate, from anatomy, that there is 'no essential difference between white men and black men' while physiology teaches that 'niggers are men and women'. Thinks that these students' hostility to the idea of the 'humanity of coloured men' might be due to their view that such people are 'better subjects than monkeys' for 'dissection'.



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Issue 1015 (22 December 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 242.

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The Appetite of London

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Health


    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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showing the vast appetite for meat in London, a statistic illustrating the 'health of the metropolis'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 242.

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A British Farmer's Philosophy

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Agriculture, Philosophy


    'The Philosophy of Bacon Bacon, Francis, 1st Viscount St Alban (1561–1626) DSB ODNB
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'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 247.

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Grub for the Mind

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Parasitology, Natural History, Language


    Discusses Mr Lovell's Lovell, Mr (fl. 1860) PU1/39/24/3
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paper read to the Linnean Society Linnean Society
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describing the parasites within bees, but not in their intestinal canals. Thinks that this is a case of a 'grub that has gone the wrong way', but that the Linnean Society 'enjoyed the grub' supplied by Lovell.



Punch,  39 (1860), 247.

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A Ditty by a Doctor. Written in the Prospect of a Nice Unhealthy Winter

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Disease, Commerce


    Anticipates with much relish the range of diseases associated with winter, including influenza, jaundice, and asthma. The chorus enjoys the possibility of the increased demand for 'physic for some throttles', while the last verse notes the money-making diseases associated with other seasons.



Punch,  39 (1860), 247.

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Costermongers and Cherubs

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Disease, Human Development, Amusement, Medical Practitioners, Commerce


    Includes a discussion of a physician's letter to The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that warns of the fatal diseases that a child can catch while being wheeled about the streets in perambulators during the 'most inclement weather'. Observes that these diseases 'must be advantageous to the doctors' and that it is 'very liberal of a physician to publish them'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 247.

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Draw the Cork, Scotland!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Narcotics, Language, Cultural Geography


    Noting that 'thanks to Punch, the Spiritualists have found their occupation gone in London', discusses the chances of them succeeding in Scotland. Expects that 'a party of cool, cautious, calculating Scotchmen' would consider table-turning to be a 'waste of time'. However, suggests that Scotland is 'under the influence of spirits', citing in evidence its large consumption of spirits, cases of 'second sight or persons who see double', spirits being 'called from the vasty deep of whiskey-cellars', and spirits being raised by 'a common piece of glass' (in comparison with John Dee's Dee, John (1527–1608) DSB
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'Magic Crystal').



Punch,  39 (1860), 248–49.

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Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XLI—Bids Adieu to Henry the Seventh and Au Revior to Henry the Fourth  [41/42]Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XIX—Contains More About the Knights in the Days of Richard the First and John', Punch, 38 (1860), 240
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIII—All About Arms and Armour', Punch, 39 (1860), 28–29
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXIV—The Reigns of Edward the First and Edward the Second', Punch, 39 (1860), 38–39
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XXVII—Three Words More About the Reign of King Edward the Third', Punch, 39 (1860), 68–69
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes. Chapter XXXIV—The Time of Henry the Sixth', Punch, 39 (1860), 168
Anon, 'Punch's Book of British Costumes: Chapter XL—Should be Read by all Tragedians Before they Dress for Richard III', Punch, 39 (1860), 238–39

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Invention, Progress, Patronage


    Notes the lack of 'novelty' in 'military equipment' during the reigns of King Henry VII Henry VII, King of England and Lord of Ireland (1457–1509) ODNB
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and King Henry IV Henry IV, King of England and Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine (1366–1413) ODNB
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. Explains that Henry VII's reign witnessed the use of fluted armour and 'passe-gardes' (armour for protecting the wearer against lances), helmets 'provided with flexible and overlapping plates or ribs of steel', and other additions to the armour. (248) Later notes that this period also witnessed the introduction of the 'arquebus', a form of hand-cannon having a 'lock with a cock to hold the match', which was slow to be adopted—a feature suggesting that 'the military authorities were not much quicker then than now in adopting innovations'. Explains that the first Yeomen of the Guard were armed with bows and firearms, a situation which Punch thinks resembles the present army's use of rifles and the Brown Bess, although admitting that fifteenth-century firearms were 'scarcely an improvement on the bow'.



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Issue 1016 (29 December 1860)Expand    Contract

Punch,  39 (1860), 251.

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A Capital Bad One

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Language


Punch,  39 (1860), 251.

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A Fee Simple

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Medical Treatment, Commerce


    'The guinea given to a homeopathic physician'.



Punch,  39 (1860), 254.

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A Canzonet for Christmas By a Poet who Looks Always on the Black-Dose Side of Things

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Medical Treatment, Commerce


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