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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 41  (July to December 1861)

Punch,  41 (1861), [iii]–iv.

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Preface

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology

People mentioned:

William G Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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Punch,  41 (1861), [vii].

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Introduction

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Exploration, Controversy, Charlatanry


    Refers to an article on the controversy between John E Gray Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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and Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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.



Issue 1043 (6 July 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 1–2.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Politics, Controversy, Government


    Notes the parliamentary debate over the 'comparative claims of the Enfield and Whitworth Whitworth, Sir Joseph, 1st Baronet (1803–87) ODNB
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Rifles' (2).



Punch,  41 (1861), 3.

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Pity the Police

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Crime, Physiognomy, Physiology, Disease


    Discusses some of the medical problems caused by policemen's clothes, notably the hat, which resists 'that expansion of the Policeman's cranium which is a condition requisite to accompany the progressive development of an intelligent officer', and 'high stiff collars', which cause 'congestion' and 'baking' of the brain.



Punch,  41 (1861), 7.

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Gray's Elegy (Written in the Rooms of the Geographical Society Royal Geographical Society
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, in the presence of DU CHAILLU'S Collections'.

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Museums, Animal Behaviour, Hunting, Discovery, Publishing, Reading, Charlatanry, Race, Wonder, Display


    Written from the perspective of John E Gray Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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, zoological keeper at the British Museum British Museum
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, the narrator opens by surveying his surroundings, noting the absence of people, and questioning the nature of the 'collection', notably the 'rude cartoons' of huge gorillas. Resents the display of 'ill-stuffed' skins, and the possibility of Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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winning 'fame as a discoverer', and the prospect of 'Gorilla tales' appearing on MURRAY'S Murray, John (1808–92) ODNB
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page' and being read by 'thousands'. Attacks Du Chaillu's credibility by hoping that he will no longer profit from a book containing engravings 'cribbed' from 'ST. HILAIRE Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Étienne (1772–1844) DSB
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' (a reference to Du Chaillu 1861a Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni 1861a. Explorations & Adventures in Equatorial Africa: With Accounts of the Manners and Customs of the People, and of the Chace of the Gorilla, Crocodile, Leopard, Elephant, Hippopotamus, and Other Animals, London: John Murray
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) or enjoy burning his 'repast' with fellow 'London Lion-hunters'. Vows to 'deal a sturdy stroke' against his 'credit' and banish his 'o'er-done Gorilla' and 'tale'. Dismissing the support of Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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and Roderick I Murchison Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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for Du Chaillu, maintains his low opinion of Du Chaillu's 'specimens', seeks to make Du Chaillu prove his claims about 'Ghouls that rob the grave', and emphasizes his faults. Proceeds to his central objection to Du Chaillu: noting the claim that gorillas 'beat their bust' and 'Thrust / Their heads', admits that 'Gorilla's made / Too like a man complacence to inspire', but emphasises the anatomical differences between the 'highest Ape' and the 'lowest Nigger'. Appeals to both British Museum gorilla 'specimens' and observations of young gorillas kept in a cage in order to support the idea that the creatures were largely 'docile'. Adds that simians kept in the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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have also proved as tame as domestic livestock. Goes on to lament how Du Chaillu has represented such docile creatures to the 'reading thousands' as 'wonders of an unknown land', and to emphasise the lives of the 'Poor brutes [...] pent in cages', creatures which have not strayed 'Across Du Chaillu's equatorial life'. Gray observes that 'some kind zoologist' might characterise him as having a tendency to 'Level' his 'angry horn' at 'aught that came his way', as taking 'uncommon liberties of speech' in attacking enemies, and, despite 'large' knowledge and a 'sincere' soul, having opaque logic. The poem ends with the same imagined zoologist warning against deciding who is right and wrong in a controversy involving Du Chaillu, Gray, Owen, and Thomas H Huxley Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825–95) DSB
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.



Punch,  41 (1861), 7.

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An Absurdity in the Law

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Animal Behaviour, Crime, Vaccination

Institutions mentioned:

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
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    Discusses the problems with the legal claim that 'A Dog might bite any person once or twice without there being any remedy against the owner'. Punch laments the fact that this means that people bitten by dogs may 'not have a leg to stand on in court, unless you could duly show that there was a big dental incision in each of them'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 9.

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Not Exactly Rosewater

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture, Chemistry


    Clarifies a misleading statement in a letter to The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, which describes a chemical process for deodorising hotbeds in gardens.



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Issue 1044 (13 July 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 11.

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Down with Your Star-Dust!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Astronomy, Comparative Philology, Light, Instruments


    The initial letter of the first word of the article is formed from part of a picture in which a woman is shown looking out of a window at the moon. Behind her tiptoes a very large telescope with human legs and arms. The article notes astronomers' 'astonishment' at the 'splendid new Comet' and presents Mr Punch's evidence (which he offers as a bet to other astronomers) that the celestial body is the same as the one observed at various times in the past, and his prediction for its future appearance.



Punch,  41 (1861), 11.

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Chemical Nomenclature for Ladies

Airpump Airpump
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Chemistry, Language, Gender, Representation,


    Expresses interest in two paintings on display at the Royal Academy Royal Academy of Arts
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of a young woman called Elaine, observing that 'ELAINE, or OLEINE, is the liquid constituent of adipose matter'. Insists that Elaine has a sister, Stearine, and explains how to produce this 'crystalline compound of fat'. Desires a pictorial representation of the latter, and in a postscript notes some of the other 'pretty' female names that 'might be culled from the flowery paths of Chemistry'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 11.

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A Cruel Joke

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Adulteration, Nutrition, Crime, Medical Practitioners


Punch,  41 (1861), 12.

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Sabbatarians Snubbed

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Botanical Gardens, Societies, Education, Amusement, Religious Authority, Government, Patronage, Controversy


    Relishes news that the government has refused to endow the Royal Dublin Society Royal Dublin Society
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with money that, in the absence of the society's Sabbatarian 'fanatics', they would have made by opening their Botanical Gardens Royal Dublin Society—Botanical Gardens
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to the public for 'moral and intellectual recreation'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 13–14.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Botanical Gardens, Religious Authority, Government, Patronage, Controversy

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Dublin Society—Botanical Gardens Royal Dublin Society—Botanical Gardens
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Punch,  41 (1861), 19.

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Latest from Africa

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Exploration, Hunting, Animal Behaviour, Morality, Controversy, Publishing, Nationalism


    Reports on a recent 'Scientific meeting' in which Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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sought to end the 'discussion of the merits of his book [Du Chaillu 1861a Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni 1861a. Explorations & Adventures in Equatorial Africa: With Accounts of the Manners and Customs of the People, and of the Chace of the Gorilla, Crocodile, Leopard, Elephant, Hippopotamus, and Other Animals, London: John Murray
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]' by 'spitting in the face of the gentleman who questioned them'. Points out that this behaviour may be tolerated among gorillas but is 'not yet sanctioned' among Englishmen.



Punch,  41 (1861), 19.

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A Hint to Dr Gray

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Controversy, Exploration, Charlatanry


    Advises John E Gray Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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that when he utters a 'hallo' against Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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and his claims about apes, he is merely 'raising a shalloo'.



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Issue 1045 (20 July 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 25.

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Representative Rascals

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J P Portch, Julian (d. 1865) WBI
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Chemistry, Language, Pharmaceuticals, Quackery, Crime, Homeopathy, Hydropathy, Medical Practitioners, Education, Class


    The initial letter of the first word of the article forms part of an illustration showing a balding medical/chemical practitioner holding open the mouth of a patient, into which the practitioner is about to pour some dubious-looking potion. He is watched by an audience of yokels. Discusses the trial, 'in the Laboratory of the Court of Probate', of David G Jones Jones, David Griffith (fl. 1854–86) WBI
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, a 'vile body' who had become the legatee of a will under false pretences. Punch describes the dubious medical background of the defendant, noting that he had practised homeopathy and hydropathy for nine years, was the proprietor of a medicine which was 'not named in the Pharmacopoeia', and, worst of all, had fraudulently obtained his diploma at Marischal College, Aberdeen Marischal College, Aberdeen
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(by getting an accomplice Dr Reeves Reeves, Dr (fl. 1861) PU1/41/3/1
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to sit his examination). Laments the fact that Jones was merely 'condemned in the costs of the court' and that Reeves is still 'at large', and wishes the latter could be punished for fraud. Concludes by warning that the medical diplomas of quacks who advertise may be fraudulent.



Punch,  41 (1861), 29.

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Our National Defenders

Your Naval Inspector Naval Inspector, Your
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Education, Mathematics


Punch,  41 (1861), 30.

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The Rifle Races

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Progress

People mentioned:

Joseph Whitworth, Whitworth, Sir Joseph, 1st Baronet (1803–87) ODNB
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Claude E Minié Minié, Claude Etienne (1804–79) WBI
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Issue 1046 (27 July 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 33–34.

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Our Dramatic Correspondent

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature—Letter, Spoof; Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Palaeontology, Astronomy, Observation, Instruments, Time, Measurement


    The illustration (on 34) shows several 'Antediluvians' standing on a riverbank, and observing a comet (which has a head with a smiling face) with telescopes. The caption explains that this is meant to show how the age of the 1861 comet is 'ascertained to a Nicety', since it shows antediluvians recognising 'an Old Acquaintance of A. M. 1372'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 34–35.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Mining, Light, Instruments | Engineers, Heroism

People mentioned:

Humphry Davy Davy, Sir Humphry, Baronet (1778–1829) DSB ODNB
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    Notes the discussion of a mining bill, and of the 'sensible' support given by Henry Labouchere (1st Baron Taunton) Labouchere, Henry, 1st Baron Taunton (1798–1869) ODNB
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for proposed statues of George Stephenson Stephenson, George (1781–1848) ODNB
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and Isambard K Brunel Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1806–59) ODNB
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(35).



Punch,  41 (1861), 35.

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Yankee Greeks and Trojans

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Matter Theory, Heat, Language, Comparative Philology


    Ponders 'intelligence' from New York that 'the telegraphic wires between that city and Troy' have been burnt. Noting the difficulty of burning matter, suggests that the word should have been 'broken'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 36.

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Aids to Agriculture

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Agriculture, Machinery, Technology, Sanitation, Narcotics


    Discusses some of the inventions exhibited at the annual meeting of the Leeds Agricultural Society Leeds Agricultural Society
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, which have no apparent connection to agriculture. Attempts to justify why 'baths, beer-engines, and boot-cleaning apparatus' were included, noting, for example, that the 'farm beer-engine' will provide an invigorating drink for labourers and deter them from frequenting the public house.



Punch,  41 (1861), 40–41.

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The Guards' Monument, As It Is, and As It Should Be

Anon

Genre:

Illustration; News-Commentary

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Nationalism, War, Heroism, Disease, Government, Politics


    Opens with an illustration representing a monument to the Crimean soldiers designed by Bell (possibly Jonathan A Bell Bell, Jonathan Anderson (1809–1865) ODNB
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). The text begins by blaming Britannia's apparent ingratitude on the 'contractors she employs', and accordingly seeks to blame a committee rather than Bell for the 'failure' of the design of the Guards' Memorial in Waterloo Place. Attacks the inscription on the monument on the grounds that it suggests that British soldiers died 'at the hands' of the Russians. Appealing to the 'official returns' of the battles, points out that fever, dysentery, and cholera, were the principal causes of death and, under the guidance of 'General Mismanagement, and General Routine', caused havoc in the British military camp at Scutari. Condemning the monument as a 'mistake', suggests that this construction, on whose apex stands a statue of Florence Nightingale Nightingale, Florence (1820–1910) ODNB
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, should be inscribed with the names of the diseases that killed these British troops. (40)



Punch,  41 (1861), 42.

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The Gorillas of the Press

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour


    Following an apparently mendacious account of Prince Alfred Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh and Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1844–1900) ODNB
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in the Croydon Chronicle Croydon Chronicle (1849–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, asks, as a 'loyal subject', whether there is any protection from 'these literary Gorillas who, when hard up for club scandal, make attack upon our Princes' and the throne. This is possibly a reference to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas.



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Issue 1047 (3 August 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 43.

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[Dangers of Chest Percussion]

L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Sound


    Shows a doctor attempting to grab the nose of a patient, who is seen falling over backwards. The caption reveals that the doctor has been trying to sound his patient's chest in the 'Approved Fashion', without warning the patient beforehand. The 'irascible patient' is determined to know whether it hurts him or the doctor.



Punch,  41 (1861), 43–44.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Museums, Collecting, Natural History, Taxonomy, Government


    Discusses a parliamentary debate about the British Museum British Museum
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in which William H Gregory Gregory, Sir William Henry (1816–92) ODNB
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attacked Richard Owen's Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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plans for a 'separate asylum for Natural History'. Austen H Layard Layard, Sir Austen Henry (1817–94) ODNB
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and Richard M Milnes Milnes, Richard Monckton, 1st Baron Houghton (1809–85) ODNB
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criticised the museum's poor classification of objects and its congestion respectively, but 'PEELIDES' Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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supported Owen's plans. (43)



Punch,  41 (1861), 46, 49.

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Bock Again!

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics, Chemistry

People mentioned:

Charles Babbage, Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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Michael Faraday Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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Punch,  41 (1861), 49.

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A Ray of Talent and Mystery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Societies, Natural History, Botany, Photography


    Responds to an Athenaeum Athenaeum (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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report of the imminent dissolution of the Ray Society Ray Society
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, suggesting that the Photographic Society Photographic Society of London
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should make a claim to being the 'only, true, and original Ray Society'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 51.

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A Delicate Inquiry Office

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Human Species, Race, Human Development, Animal Behaviour


    Discusses an advertisement from a 'young widow lady' who seeks to meet a 'gentleman' and is not fussy about 'colour'. Wonders how such a lady could advertise for 'an elderly nigger' and suggests that she is, 'as the well-spoken young lady said of the Gorilla, very plain'.



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Issue 1048 (10 August 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 55.

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Servants and Their Schooling

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Domestic Economy, Physical Geography, Astronomy, Instruments


    Upholding the need for well-educated servants, insists that domestic skills such as needlework and cooking are more important to servants than 'the knowledge of Geography' and 'the use of the Telescope'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 55.

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'Un Sujet Noir'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Public Health, Pollution, Race, Cultural Geography, War


    Noting that Mr Cooke's (possibly William F Cooke Cooke, Sir William Fothergill (1806–79) ODNB
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) new 'system of ventilation', promises to exclude 'those enemies to ventilation, the blacks', recommends the invention 'for universal use in America' where it would ventilate the question of slavery and the troubles between the northern and southern states. Suggests that those 'espousing the cause of "the blacks"' have also had trouble with 'ventilation', since they have been lynched. Anticipates that Cooke's invention will also help that 'large class of persons' who cannot talk about slavery without 'getting black in their face'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 56.

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Rational Monuments

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Heroism, Engineers, Railways, Medical Practitioners, Hospitals


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Issue 1049 (17 August 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 63–64.

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The Civil War in America

Gorilla Gorilla
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof; Reportage

Subjects:

Race, War, Cultural Geography


Punch,  41 (1861), 69.

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A Medal for the Museum

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Reading, Museums, Education


    Assesses Anthony Panizzi's Panizzi, Sir Anthony (1797–1879) ODNB
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design of a 'Reading Pavillion' at the British Museum British Museum
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, a building which it ranks higher than the 'Splitting Giraffe, or the Fossil Man, or the Stone Tortoise', but then criticises the number of 'chattering Nuisances that infest our temple of study'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 69.

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Definition by an Antimatrimonialist

Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Gender, Animal Behaviour


    Defines a 'Club' to be 'a weapon of defence carried by male Gorillas to keep away the white women'—probably a reference to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas.



Punch,  41 (1861), 70.

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A Case of Real Distress

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Controversy, Animal Behaviour, Museums, Species, Government


    Noting the recent controversy between John E Gray Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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and Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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, reports that the government has purchased a gorilla specimen over which Gray is to have charge. Pities Gray always having before him 'a souvenir of his defeat'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 71.

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The Game of Crossing the Rhine

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology


Punch,  41 (1861), 72.

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Steam Wanted at the Admiralty

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Progress, Government, Politics, Time, Measurement


    Contrasts the large number of French iron-cased frigates in operation with the fact that the only British iron vessel 'will not be at sea before October'. Laments the slowness of the Admiralty Admiralty
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in giving and executing its orders. Suggests that the rate of progress might be increased by fixing a maximum time for 'all their moves' using a gigantic sand-glass, rather like in the game of chess.



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Issue 1050 (24 August 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 73.

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The Cricketer's Loss and Gain

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Heat, Measurement, Nutrition, Disease

People mentioned:

Rene A F de Réaumur Réaumur, René-Antoine Ferchault de (1683–1757) DSB
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    The writer of this spoof letter asks Alderman Gutch for his opinion on news that cricketers in Canterbury had played at temperatures 'above blood-heat' and 'on a full stomach', apparently oblivious to the dangers of apoplexy. Explaining how much heat must be lost by cricketers during a game, ponders the reasons why they are so obese.



Punch,  41 (1861), 75.

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Meteors for the Million

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation, Methodology, Amateurism


    Discusses the strange instructions which Punch has been given by 'an eminent astronomer' for observing and recording the 'position and appearance' of meteors. The instructions require the observer to clasp a tree at arm's length, swing his body until the bole of the tree crosses the meteor's path, and inscribe a chalk mark on the tree's 'face' in order to measure the position of the meteor. Notes the ill effects of this procedure on the body and mind, and goes on to consider the astronomer's protocols for recording the appearance, time of flight, and other details about the comet. Ironically deems such protocols 'vastly clear and lucid', and questions why they do not explain what observers should do if meteors 'fall behind them' or to whom they should send their inscribed trees. Anticipates the pleasure that this will give to those 'blest with scientific minds', but warns of the dangers of confusing meteors with policemen's bull's-eyes.



Punch,  41 (1861), 79.

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A Home Question

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism


Punch,  41 (1861), 79–80.

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Savages in Suffolk

An Enemy to Gorillas Enemy to Gorillas, An
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour


    Describing his experiences during a trip on the lines of the Eastern Counties Railway Company Eastern Counties Railway Company
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, criticises members of the volunteer force for 'firing rifles on a railroad', adding that 'it is too bad that the Volunteers should sink in public estimation, because a few Gorillas please to act after the manner of street-boys on Guy Faux day'. (79). This refers to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas.



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Issue 1051 (31 August 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 85.

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The Complaint of Christopher Sly

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Narcotics, Mental Illness, Language, Charlatanry, Scientific Practitioners


    Discusses a paper on 'Dipsomania' or the 'passion for intoxicating drink' read by Thomas L Mackesy Mackesy, Thomas Lewis (1790–1869) WBI
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to a Dublin meeting of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science National Association for the Promotion of Social Science
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(the paper is referred to in Anon 1862c Anon. 1862c. 'Dipsomania or Uncontrollable Drunkenness', Transactions of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, Select Papers Notes of Papers, etc., 597–598
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). Questions the intelligence of those who use the term in this way, on the grounds that they appear to have linked 'habitual thirst' with 'habitual drunkenness'. Concludes by claiming that owing to their taste for drink, 'philosophers' have a more profound acquaintance with the 'philosophy of drunkenness' than anybody else.



Punch,  41 (1861), 89.

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Sentence on a Bridge

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Language

Institutions mentioned:

Hungerford Suspension Bridge, Hungerford Suspension Bridge
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Clifton Suspension Bridge Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol
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    Notes that owing to the 'Chain of evidence' being 'complete against Hungerford Bridge', it is to be transported to Clifton, 'and there to be hung in chains'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 90.

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The Genuine Art of Cramming

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Education, Psychology, Physiology,


    Responds to news that H Kennedy Kennedy, H (fl. 1861) PU1/41/9/3
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read a paper on 'The Influence of the Food on the Intellect' at the meeting of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science National Association for the Promotion of Social Science
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(the paper is referred to in Anon 1862d Anon. 1862d. 'Influence of the Food on the Intellect', Transactions of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, Select Papers Notes of Papers, etc., 592–593
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). Argues that the influence of food on the intellect depends on what is being swallowed, but points out that Kennedy was referring to vegetable and animal substances rather than intellectual subjects. Goes on to explore the relations between diet and mind, as suggested by various common phrases: for example, suggests that the phosphorous in the brain 'may be concerned in the evolution of luminous ideas', and notes the tendency of highly intelligent people to be obese or epicurean. Suggests that 'a mental restaurant' might be established near a college 'in order that the students might cultivate particular branches of knowledge on the dishes suitable to each', and imagines that the meals served by such an institution would include 'Mathematical stew' and 'Chemical fondu'.



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Issue 1052 (7 September 1841)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 94.

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Martyrdom Super Mare

A Musical Ear Musical Ear, A
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Health,


    Describes his trip to a place which he christens 'Sandbath', a location which his physician has recommended visiting after a noisy and busy London season including such attractions as 'evenings with Gorillas'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 95.

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Infirmaries for Drunkards

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Narcotics, Mental Illness, Hospitals, Government


    Arguing that the only plausible part of the word 'Dipsomania' is 'mania', laments the case of a 'maniac of the tipsy class' who killed himself by jumping out of window. Provides an extract of a report which recounts that relatives of the deceased could not restrain him by sending him to a lunatic asylum because they did not possess a medical certificate. Urges that 'Humanity must admit that the suicide of a sot' should be prevented and expects that it will take a statesman being struck by a falling drunkard to make an 'Act for the safe Custody and Care of Persons afflicted with Delirium Tremens'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 95.

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Utilising a Nuisance

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Geology, Vulcanology


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Issue 1053 (14 September 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 103.

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M. Blondin's Bumps

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Phrenology, Physiology, Psychology, Amusement, Animal Behaviour


    Discusses a letter to 'one of our cheap contemporaries' by Frederick Bridges Bridges, Frederick (d. 1883) Cooter 1989
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on the subject of the 'phrenological and physiological characteristics' of the tightrope walker Charles Blondin Blondin, Charles (Jean François Gravelet) (1824–97) CBD
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, whom he visited. Surprised by Bridges's claim that Blondin has no tendency towards 'stuck-up self-importance', and notes that, according to Bridges's phrenological high opinion of Blondin's intellectual faculties, his organisation 'would do pretty well for a SIR ISSAC NEWTON Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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' as well as Blondin. Considers the appropriateness of Blondin's mental organs for his profession: for example, supposes that his large organs of cautiousness and reflectiveness would have to be balanced by 'the force of "combativeness" and the conscious ability of "constructiveness", "size", and "weight"' to stop him from 'tumbling off his perch'. Draws attention to the phrenological differences between Blondin and his rival Léotard Léotard (1838–70) WBI
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and endorses Bridges's observation of the similarity between Blondin and the squirrel. Noting that both squirrels and monkeys are acrobats, observes that 'Anti-Phrenologists' might respond that 'neither the squirrel nor the monkey are endowed with the cerebral development of M. BLONDIN', but expects Bridges to reply by arguing that as 'it takes a wise man to make a fool, so also it asks a philosopher to emulate a jackanapes'. Notes that Bridges's evidence for Blondin's 'well-balanced' brain 'will be accepted without cavil'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 106.

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Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Engineering, Language


Punch,  41 (1861), 109.

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Crowner's Quest Queries

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Dialogue, Spoof

Subjects:

Crime, Mathematics

People mentioned:

Euclid Euclid (fl. 295 BC) DSB
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Punch,  41 (1861), 110.

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Ancient and Modern Quacks

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Archaeology, Ancient Authorities, Medical Practitioners, Quackery, Charlatanry, Commerce


    Discusses a Builder Builder (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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report of some 'relics of the ancient Romans who inhabited Uriconnium', amongst which is a stamp that advertised (in Latin) a cure for eye complaints. Emphasises the similarity between 'ancient and modern quackery', not least the fact that the Roman quack dubbed himself 'physician', much like the way the notorious David G Jones Jones, David Griffith (fl. 1854–86) WBI
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called himself 'doctor', without having any medical qualification (see Anon, 'Representative Rascals', Punch, 41 (1861), 25). Concludes by observing that 'As of old, so now, Quack is Quack and Rogue is Rogue'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 111.

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From Our Sensitive Contributor

Your Sensitive Contributor Sensitive Contributor, Your
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Societies, Geology


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Issue 1054 (21 September 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 114.

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Astronomical Insects

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Mathematics, Astronomy, Natural History, Zoology, Animal Behaviour


    Discusses papers on 'Geometrical Nets in Space' and on geometric nets spun by spiders delivered at the recent British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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meeting (probably referring to Hamilton 1862 Hamilton, William Rowan 1862. 'On Geometric Rests in Space', Report of the Thirty-First Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science held at Manchester in September 1861, Notes and Abstracts of Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 4
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and West 1862 West, Tuffen 1862. 'On Some Points of Interest in the Structure and Habits of Spiders', Report of the Thirty-First Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science held at Manchester in September 1861, Notes and Abstracts of Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 162–64
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). Questions whether spiders are responsible for the 'geometrical nets which exist in absolute space'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 115.

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Arms and the Man

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Hunting, Controversy


    Noting Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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claim to have shot a gorilla with a rifle-ball that would have killed a 'Man or monkey', points out that John E Gray Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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retorted that 'the man-monkey's wounds in the back are, / And the weapon employed—the long-bow'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 115.

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Rather Down in the Mouth

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Commerce, Quackery


    Discusses the claim of a 'cheap advertising Dentist' who offers to 'stop teeth at a shilling a-piece', a remedy which Punch considers '"too filling" at the price'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 120–21.

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No Reform of the Income-Tax

Crassus Crassus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Commerce

People mentioned:

William Farr Farr, William (1807–83) ODNB
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    Discusses a paper on income tax delivered by David Chadwick Chadwick, David (1821–95) ODNB
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at the 1861 meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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, a version of which was published as Chadwick 1862 Chadwick, David 1862. 'On Recent Improvements in Cotton-Gin', Report of the Thirty-First Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science; Held at Manchester in September 1861, Notes and Abstracts of Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 256
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.



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Issue 1055 (28 September 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 123.

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Professor Owen on Relics

Boa Constrictor Boa Constrictor
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Religion, Religious Authority, Palaeontology, Controversy, Geology, Evolution, Extra-Terrestrial Life


    Discusses a passage in Freshfield 1861 [Freshfield, Mrs. Henry] 1861. Alpine Byways; or, Light Leaves gathered in 1859 and 1860 by a Lady, London: Longman, Green , Longmans & Roberts
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in which the author recounts a meeting with Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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, who observed that some of the 'bones of the 11,000 Virgins' in Cologne's Church of St Ursula, Cologne Church of Saint Ursula, Cologne
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were the remains of dogs, cats, and other domestic creatures. Attempts to explain this by referring to a pseudonymous review of Temple 1860 [Temple, Frederick et al.] 1860. Essays and Reviews, London: J. W. Parker
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in the Tablet Tablet (1840–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, in which the author accounts for the fossils of extinct animals by suggesting that they were 'transported hither from some other planet [...] by the devil'. The reviewer noted that geologists who infer from these fossils 'a higher antiquity than what the Church allows' are consequently victims of a 'scientific imposture'. Argues that such a 'common sense' theory can explain Owen's observations on the grounds that the devil placed the remains of domestic animals in the Cologne church as 'bait to catch a philosopher', and also asked somebody to remove the 'genuine Virgins' bones'. Anticipates that St Ursula's tomb will contain the remains of a 'she-bear' and supposes that the statue of the 'Three Magi' may have been replaced 'with the crania of quadrupeds'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 125.

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The Great Disease of the Church

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Religion, Disease, Language


    'Pluracy'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 125.

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Not the Difference of a Hair Between Them

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

FB, pseud.  [Frank Bellew] Bellew, Frank (d. 1889) WBI
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Hunting, Collecting, Human Species, Evolution, Time, Race, Cultural Geography


    The initial letter of the text ('S') forms part of an illustration in which a giraffe has curled its head under its body and is confronting an African warrior. The text discusses Richard Owen's Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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lecture at the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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on the simians introduced into Britain by Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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(a version of which was published as Owen 1862 Owen, Richard 1862. 'On Some Objects of Natural History from the Collection of M. Du Chaillu', Report of the Thirty-First Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science; Held at Manchester in September 1861, Notes and Abstracts of Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 155–156
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). Considers Owen's observation of the grey hairs on ageing chimpanzees to be both 'a comfort to man' and 'another proof' of 'how closely the two races [humans and chimpanzees] are allied'. The narrator relates first-hand observations of ageing monkeys, which are 'very unpleasant-looking' and have a tendency to 'idle chatter'. Notes that monkeys, unlike white humans, 'acquire a leaden black hue by age', and suggests that were white people so affected, they might suffer enslavement in America. Observes that some people grow blacker internally as they age. Contemplates the 'comical' scene of a monkey looking at himself in a mirror and how its sense of its ageing would increase the volume of cosmetics it used.



Punch,  41 (1861), 125.

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[Cold for Sale]

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Disease, Medical Treatment


    Wishes to sell his 'Long Established Cold', along with his collection of cough lozenges.



Punch,  41 (1861), 131.

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Very Like a Whale

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Language, Commerce

Institutions mentioned:

SS Great Eastern SS Great Eastern
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Issue 1056 (5 October 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 140.

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Newspaper Distress Meeting

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Periodicals, Animal Behaviour, Zoology


    Concerns a meeting to discuss the 'present unexpected failure of News Crops' at which Mr Slash agrees that the news was so disappointing that 'he had that morning given out a report of an address by MR. SPURGEON Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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about the Gorilla'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 141.

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Green Go the Lasses, O!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Chemistry, Light, Disease, Adulteration, Analytical Chemistry, Gender


    Discusses a letter to a contemporary periodical, written by an 'M.D.', explaining how the fashionable mauve used in colouring crinoline dresses fades in artificial light. The letter also warns of the dangers of the cloth 'tarlatane', much used in women's dresses, which is dyed with 'Scheele's Green' and contains large quantities of arsenic. The arsenic is 'given off in poisonous dust' when dresses made from the material are folded, and leads to severe medical conditions. Urges that such garments should be labelled to indicate their poisonous nature. Goes on to note the warnings of M.D. about women's headdresses that also contain large quantities of arsenic. Lamenting the difficulty of preaching against fashions, urges the 'male sex' to keep away from girls wearing a 'verdant dress or wreath', a strategy it is hoped will force women to change their fashion.



Punch,  41 (1861), 141.

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The Nation that Turns out Most Negatives

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Photography, Cultural Geography, Nationalism, Language


    Reports a recent census showing the large number of people who 'get their living from Photography' and the case of a Francophobic 'old fogey' who insists that the French 'were the cleverest chaps in the world for making faces'.



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Issue 1057 (12 October 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 143.

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A National Defender

John Smith Smith, John
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Cultural Geography, Animal Behaviour, Zoology


    Responds to a correspondent, 'G.U.', in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, who accuses the English of dressing badly and behaving uncivilly. Notes that the correspondent implies that professional people, such as 'our barristers and doctors', deport themselves 'generally less like educated gentlemen than uncivilised Gorillas'. The latter observation refers to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas.



Punch,  41 (1861), 144.

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Regimental Assasins

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

War, Human Species, Animal Behaviour, Instinct


    Lamenting the fact that 'armies must be in considerable part composed of men of moral worth and intelligence' and that such men should be destroyed by 'beasts', argues that military service 'ought to be penal servitude'. Points out that 'There are, no doubt, numerous unconvicted British scoundrels who would be glad to fight for pay and plunder, and the gratification of their innate ferocity'—a pointed remark in the context of the contemporary debate over the behaviour of gorillas. Proceeds to discuss the possibility of building the British Army Army
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using those men who are 'now murdering the Americans and one another'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 144.

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The Fall of the Apple

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Manufactories, Industry, Chemistry, Gravity


    Discusses news that Manchester calico-dyers and printers have begun using apple juice in their manufacture of 'fast colours and printed cottons', noting that 'This is not the first time in history' that 'a question of momentous gravity' has 'turned' upon the 'fall' of the apple—a reference to Isaac Newton's Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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discovery of gravity.



Punch,  41 (1861), 145.

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Negroes in Africa and Europe

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Race, Invention, Cultural Geography


    Noting the claim of a writer in the Cornhill Magazine Cornhill Magazine (1860–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that 'the Negro [...] invents nothing, originates nothing, improves nothing', insists that the same can be said of the House of Bourbon.



Punch,  41 (1861), [147].

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Thames and His Tributary

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Sanitation, Pollution


    Shows a dirty looking 'FATHER THAMES' standing by a large pipe on the banks of his river. He salutes John Thwaites Thwaites, Sir John (1815–1870) ODNB
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, the chairman of the Metropolitan Board of Works Metropolitan Board of Works
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, who stands with his back to the reader and wears a sandwich board bearing the words 'Thames Embankment Thames Embankment
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. Metropolitan Board of Works and No Surrender'. Father Thames points out that had they waited for Thwaites's initiative he 'should have nothing to fear'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 149–50.

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Mr Spurgeon's Advice to Bachelors

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Religion, Animal Behaviour, Zoology


    Discusses a lecture on 'that popular monster the gorilla' given by Charles H Spurgeon Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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at the 'Newington Monster-Tabernacle' Metropolitan Tabernacle
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. Notes Spurgeon's claim that 'the worst Gorillas were bachelor Gorillas' (a reference to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas) and that such bachelors would benefit from the 'softening influence of female society', and by 'taking under his sheltering wing one who could give him more than he could give her'. (150) Reflects on some of the reasons why the latter remarks met with laughter.



Punch,  41 (1861), 150.

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Medical Manslaughter

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Narcotics, Language, Education, Class


    With reference to cases in which patients have been given incorrect and often poisonous medicines, notes the act of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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that requires all poisons to be labelled as such. Emphasises the confusion caused by surgeons and chemists labelling the same substances 'For External application only', a practice confusing to the illiterate domestic servants who might administer medicines. Suggests that this long-winded medical phrase be replaced with something more intelligible such as 'NOT TO BE TOOK INSIDE'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 152.

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Scientific Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Universities, Ethnology, Language


    Reports how an undergraduate explained to his coach that he was reading a 'Guide to the Turf' in order to gain knowledge of ethnology, 'or the knowledge of the Races'.



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Issue 1058 (19 October 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 153.

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Punch's Pulpit Lozenges

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Religion, Medical Treatment, Commerce


    Promotes these lozenges as a means of enabling clergymen to cure such vocal problems as 'stammering and lingual hesitation', to achieve a 'level, smooth, and glib pronunciation', and to make their voices heard 'where previously their preaching was so utterly inaudible that it could do little good'. Adds that Mr Punch has testimonials supporting his product and that buyers are encouraged to make further purchases.



Punch,  41 (1861), 154.

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Surrounding Savages

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Human Species, War, Race, Animal Behaviour, Cultural Geography


    Discusses a report of a duel to be held between some Serbian officers and the Austrian consul who apparently showed disrespect to Prince Alexander Karadjordjevic Karadjordjevic, Alexander, Prince of Serbia (1806–1885) CBD
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of Serbia. Considers the 'servility of Servian [i.e. Serbian] officers in thus drawing lots to determine which of them should sacrifice himself or another man to his master's affronted dignity' to be 'on par with the self-devotion of the sable aborigines of Dahomey to their dingy sovereign'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 154.

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The Height of Egotism

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Religious Authority, Lecturing


    'SPURGEON Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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lecturing on the Gorilla'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 159.

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A Faithful Spirit that can Make Himself Generally Useful

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Representation, Photography, Charlatanry


    Reflecting on claims that 'the Spirits' can 'take portraits', anticipates other useful domestic activities that they might undertake, thus positing a 'Spirit-of-all-work' who could fulfil this duty without needing payment or nourishment, and without causing such disturbances as chattering. Goes on to discuss a letter published in the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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(a reference to Anon 1861b
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), which presents evidence for a spirit having produced a portrait of the correspondent's dead mother. Considers the impact of this phenomenon on traditional methods of painting and photography. Concludes by wondering what the 'Spirit of Humbug', spiritualism, 'will be thy next little caper'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 161.

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Another Attack on the Gorilla

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Zoology, Natural History, Language, Cultural Geography


    Reports on how a 'Naturalist', with a limited knowledge of French and trying to explain to a Frenchman 'the actions of the Gorilla', inadvertently gave the impression that gorillas beat drums, a reference to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas.



Punch,  41 (1861), 160–61.

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Mr Punch on Some Popular Delusions Touching Travellers British and Foreign

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Travelogue, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Human Species


    Insists that 'British travellers—male and female—include specimens both of the Guy and the Gorilla' (a reference to Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas) and accordingly protests against attacks on his compatriots' uncivil behaviour towards foreigners (160).



Punch,  41 (1861), 161.

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Plain Words for Plain People

Joe Snaffle Snaffle, Joe
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Development, Medical Treatment


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Issue 1059 (26 October 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 163.

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Patent Potatoes

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture, Patents, Language, Gravity


    Discusses the implications of 'Patent Gravity Selected Potatoes', an advertisement for which he recently observed. Taking 'gravity' to connote austerity, suggests that other vegetables may be selected for their states of mind. Equally puzzled by the possibility of patenting potatoes.



Punch,  41 (1861), 165.

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Painting the Lily

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Adulteration, Narcotics


Punch,  41 (1861), 169.

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A Model Miscellany

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Extract, Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Periodicals, Mental Illness, Hospitals


    Presents examples of miscellaneous information from a periodical, which include a report of the noises made by a bear in the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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, an extract from a discussion of the obedience of 'animals of a bucolic character' to sheep-dogs, and an item concerning the favourable report from the 'Asylum for Idiots'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 169.

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A Would-be Auto da Fé

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Publishing, Religious Authority, Religion


    Discusses news that the Bishop of Barcelona, Antonio Palau y Termens Palau y Termens, Antonio (1806–62) WBI
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, has consigned 'three hundred volumes' of publications on 'spiritual manifestations' to the flames. Adds that this act has rendered popery unpopular in Spain and inadvertently promoted spiritualism in that country. Suggests that the 'reverend prelate' should have undertaken the task more discreetly, and argues that in former centuries he would have burnt the authors of the works as 'necromancers and sorcerers'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 169.

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Incredible Humbug

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Phrenology, Crime, Psychology, Anatomy, Controversy, Charlatanry, Religious Authority


    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that a prison surgeon refused to make a plaster cast of a dead criminal on the grounds that it was 'unnecessary for the purpose of science'. Observing that 'There are a few people who do not think that there is something in phrenology', upholds the 'scientific importance' of establishing a 'coincidence between type of head and character', and argues that casts of heads of criminals can solve the question of whether phrenology 'is all humbug or no'. Denies the plausibility of the report, deeming the alleged actions of the surgeon to be more appropriate to a 'shuffling bishop, desirous of stifling theological investigation'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 170–71.

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Mr Punch on Some Popular Delusions. Touching Travellers British and Foreign

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Travelogue, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Cultural Geography, Accidents


    Contrasting his experiences of travelling on English and Continental railways, admits that English railways suffer from reckless management and dangerously fast trains, but adds that he would 'rather risk a smash on an English line, than crawl in a sorrowful, or savage safety on a Belgian, German, or French one; and this, not for the advantage of speed only, or mainly, but because of the ineffable superiority of our English railway system in every point that affects the traveller's comfort' (170). Goes on to describe some of the other drawbacks of travelling on Continental trains.



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Issue 1060 (2 November 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 173.

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The Perfect Cure

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Religious Authority, Spiritualism


    Shows Charles H Spurgeon Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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levitating above a stage which, as the caption reveals, is at the 'MR. SP—RG—ON'S NEW CANTERBURY HALL New Canterbury Music-Hall
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' (an allusion to Spurgeon's new Metropolitan Tabernacle Metropolitan Tabernacle
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and emphasizing its theatricality). On the wall behind him are posted notices advertising 'SHREWS / LECTURE / SCREAMING FARCE' and 'GORILLA / AND / ALL ABOUT / HIM'. The latter is a reference to Spurgeon's recent lecture on gorillas.



Punch,  41 (1861), 175.

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Our Dramatic Correspondent

One Who Pays One Who Pays
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Mesmerism


Punch,  41 (1861), 179.

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Papal Peepshows

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Religion, Disease, Nutrition, Geology, Controversy


    Discussing the religious relics that Englishmen can observe during visits abroad, imagines a speech made to 'sight-seers' by a 'fat priest' who shows his audience a 'tooth of Saint Ticdouloureux, who fell a martyr (to neuralgia) A.D. 1466' and whose teeth were apparently extracted under torture. Continuing this portrait of the priest, imagines that he points to the habitation of Saint Earwiggus, whose century-long 'subsistence upon sea-weed and raw shrimps' has 'caused a great sensation to the savants of geology', and has prompted some of its 'heretics' to deny that shrimps or seaweed could exist so high above sea-level.



Punch,  41 (1861), 181.

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Comfort for Cumming

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Eschatology, Exhibitions, Amusement, Prognostication


    Drawing attention to John Cumming's Cumming, John (1807–81) ODNB
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prediction of the 'end of the world', interprets this to mean Wyld's Great Globe Wyld's Great Globe, Leicester Square
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in Leicester Square, 'which is doomed'. Consoles Cumming for not being appreciated by pointing out that 'no one is a prophet in his own country. Look at Old Moore', a reference to the almanac maker Francis Moore Moore, Francis (1657–1714?) ODNB
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.



Punch,  41 (1861), 182.

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Neighbours Getting Over their Distance to one Another

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Railways, Internationalism, Engineers, Prognostication, Steam-power, Heroism


    Rejoices at news of the South-Eastern Railway Company's South Eastern Railway Company
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rapid steamship between Boulogne and Folkestone, on the grounds that it will improve Anglo-French relations. Adds that 'The kettle, in the vapour of which young James Watt Watt, James (1736–1819) DSB
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prophetically saw the first steamer, will thus turn out to be the most powerful pacificator the world has ever known', and suggests that the Peace Society Peace Society
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adopt the 'kettle as its crest'.



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Issue 1061 (9 November 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 183.

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The Prince at the Bar

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Education, Universities, Mathematics, Class


    Discussing Prince Edward's Edward VII, King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India (1841–1910) ODNB
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embarkation on a legal training, considers the winding and predetermined 'royal road' to learning that he will follow, including the jump 'To the Isis from the Cam' (i.e. from the University of Cambridge University of Cambridge
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to the University of Oxford University of Oxford
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), a change that is so dramatic that one should 'Ask him not if mathematic, / Or if classic be his choice, / By this royal road erratic / He must trudge, without a choice'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 184.

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A Woman Never Grows Old

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Statistics, Human Species, Railways, Death, Gender, Animal Behaviour, Morality

People mentioned:

William Farr Farr, William (1807–83) ODNB
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    Discusses the recently published annual returns of births and deaths (Anon 1861a Anon. 1861a. Twenty-Second Annual Report of the Registrar-General of Births, Deaths and Marriages in England (England and Wales), London: HMSO
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), and concludes from the report that 'there are as many accidents on one's journey through life as there are unfortunately on a railway', with most people breaking down half way or failing to arrive at their destination. Also draws attention to the evidence that women outlive men, exclaiming that 'women beat the men at everything' and are obstinate even about death, but noting that 'wife-beating' is an exception to this. Admits, however, that it might be wrong 'in alluding to such contemptible creatures [women], who, far from ranking equal to Man, degrade themselves to a lower level even than that of the Brute'. Goes on to relate that the two oldest people on the register are women from Wales, but suggests that they may have lied about their ages.



Punch,  41 (1861), 184.

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Pointing a Cannon with a Moral Purpose

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Military Technology, Sanitation, Public Health, Environmentalism, Morality


    Suggests that when experiments are next performed on Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns, the weapons be directed at Holywell Street in order to destroy 'that vile haunt of impurity and infidelity'. Concludes that if the gun successfully removes 'that filthy impediment to the free circulation of fresh air and pure thought', then the author will defend the weapon against its detractors.



Punch,  41 (1861), 185.

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Episcopal Photography

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof; Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Photography, Religious Authority, Language


    Reports on the photographic interests of the new Bishop of Gloucester, William Thomson Thomson, William (1819–90) ODNB
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, by quoting Anthony A Cooper (7th Earl of Shaftesbury) Cooper, Anthony Ashley, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (formerly styled 'Lord Ashley') (1801–85) ODNB
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as asserting that he had appointed 'an ecclesiastic of the decided school, and in fact, [...] all his views are Positives'. The illustration shows a portly gentleman being photographed.



Punch,  41 (1861), 189–90.

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A New Complaint

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Crime, Class, Language, Hospitals, Medical Treatment, Morality


    Discusses the 'novel complaint' of 'kleptomania', which is defined as 'a strange and inexplicable desire to take what does not belong to you' and appears to be applied to 'genteel' people, whereas 'thieving' is used to describe 'a low, vulgar person'. Explains that the difference between these terms is not only one of social class, but that a kleptomaniac 'cannot help himself' and is no more to blame for what he does than sufferers of St Vitus's dance. Adding that kleptomaniacs should be sent to hospital rather than prison, laments the number of kleptomaniacs who were wrongly imprisoned, and suggests renaming thieves' prisons 'hospitals for the reception of kleptomaniacs'. (189) Concludes by stressing that 'allusions to thieving and stealing must, henceforth, be adapted, so as to meet the exigencies of this new mental infirmity' (190).



Punch,  41 (1861), 190.

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A Distressing Case of 'Kleptomania'

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Crime, Hospitals, Medical Treatment


    Following Anon, 'A New Complaint', Punch, 41 (1861), 189–90, shows a shady looking man—the victim of kleptomania—on a street pavement. He is being led away by 'Doctors X1 and Z2', dressed as police constables, to the hospital, where 'steps are now being taken for his recovery'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 190.

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Our Superiors in Everything

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Cultural Geography, Nationalism, Invention, Astronomy, Chemistry, Anatomy, Physiology, Gravity, Engineering, Steam-power, Railways


    Noting the popularity of the French 'teaspoon bonnet' in England, insists that the 'French certainly do excel us in everything'. To support this argument for the superiority of the French, sarcastically notes the dearth of eminent English scientific practitioners, complaining, for example, that England has 'no famous astronomer, no chemical investigators, no anatomical and physiological discoverer' to rank with 'certain Frenchmen of the same description'. Similarly, attributes to the French, such scientific and technological accomplishments as the demonstration of 'the circulation of the blood' and the invention of the steam engine.



Punch,  41 (1861), 191.

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The St Stephen of Literature

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Zoology, Hunting, Controversy


    Suggests that since Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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has been struck with 'So many stones and pebbles' for publishing his book (Du Chaillu 1861a Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni 1861a. Explorations & Adventures in Equatorial Africa: With Accounts of the Manners and Customs of the People, and of the Chace of the Gorilla, Crocodile, Leopard, Elephant, Hippopotamus, and Other Animals, London: John Murray
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), he should change his name to 'M. Du Caillou', the latter being the French for a small stone.



Punch,  41 (1861), 192.

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Samuel the Saint-Seer

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Light, Physiology, Mesmerism, Spiritualism


    Discusses remarks on vision made by the Bishop of Oxford, Samuel Wilberforce Wilberforce, Samuel (1805–73) ODNB
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, at a 'county blind-school' in York. Questions the bishop's claim that most people can see 'the radiance and glory which mantled around the features of the Holy Saints'. Supposes that Wilberforce must be 'a seer of saints' and, supposing that the 'phosphorescence' of saints may be the 'Odic or Odylic Light' which only Karl L Reichenbach's Reichenbach, Karl (or Carl) Ludwig ()1788–1869 DSB
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'sensitives' could perceive, adds that the bishop might also be a 'sensitive' and can only see saints in the dark.



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Issue 1062 (16 November 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 195.

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Nurslings of the Waves

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Universities, Sound, Lecturing


    Discusses the poor acoustics of the hall in which David Brewster Brewster, Sir David (1781–1868) DSB ODNB
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gave an address 'touching on science in general' to the University of Edinburgh University of Edinburgh
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, of which he was principal.



Punch,  41 (1861), 199.

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The Health of Ireland

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Politics, Analogy, Disease


    Urges that those 'medical men' caring for the 'body politic' attend to Ireland, whose condition has been worsened by the cessation of Irish emigration to America (owing to the Civil War). Describes some of the symptoms likely to be observed, including 'all manner of inflammations and irruptions', but is more hopeful that 'agitations' will not ensue.



Punch,  41 (1861), 199.

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Literary Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Museums, Natural History, Zoology, Collecting, Government


    Noting the government's decision to remove 'all the beasts from the British Museum British Museum
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', claims this as good news for those disturbed by those who chatter in the museum's reading room.



Punch,  41 (1861), 199.

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Mathematics for Practical Men

Anon

Genre:

Instructions, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics, Language, Gender


    Consists of five sections which, by punning on words such as 'figure', 'draw', 'incline', 'elevation', and 'chord', turn geometrical proofs into accounts of what will happen to various people (here named with a series of letters as if they were geometrical figures) under certain conditions. For example, in 'THEOREM V.—Solution of the Vexata Quaestio in reference to Bodies moving in Space', states: 'Let PF be the Plain Figure of Fine Lady [...], and MB the circumference of a Modern Belle. Then from AC, the Acute Angle of the eye of the Candid Critic, let attention be drawn to LB, the Line of Beauty, and LB will be found to reach considerably beyond PF, the Plain Figure'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 200.

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The Triumphs of Owen by the Muse of the Museum (Slightly Altered from GRAY Gray, Thomas (1716–71) ODNB
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)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Museums, Natural History, Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Government, Politics


    Opens by praising Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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, implicitly in reference to the government's decision to relocate the natural history collections of the British Museum British Museum
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. The rest of the poem calls on the various species in the collections to prepare for the move, drawing attention to the stifling environment to which they have become accustomed. For example, it tells the 'Dusty, straddling, split giraffe, / You have stayed too long by half, / Go and take some nice fresh air / With that grim Polar bear', and later turns to 'Fossil Man' whom it advises to 'pack, / Take your slab, Sir, on your back', and 'All those myriad butterflies, / Pins and all, must please to rise'. Concludes by observing how 'OWEN stands / Moulding GLADSTONE Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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to his hands' and tells the animals in the collections that 'you'll have a Palace new, / Worthy OWEN, us, and you'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 202.

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Our Female Ironsides

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Industry, Language, Metallurgy, Gender, Military Technology, Steamships


    Discusses an advertisement in the Sheffield Independent Sheffield Independent (1819–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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for a 'Cold CRINOLINE ROLLER' required to 'work six pairs of Rolls', giving as the contact address an iron and steel works. The narrator interprets this statement as indicating that petticoats are now made from steel. Playing on the ironic contrast between the fragility of crinoline and the hardness of steel, suggests that the machine to be operated by the hired 'ROLLER' is one whose 'tremendous powers' can only be entrusted to competent workmen. Goes on to imagine the noise and glow produced during the production of 'rolls of cold crinoline', noting the creation of sparks under a Nasmyth Nasmyth, James (1808–90) DSB
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steam-hammer. Suggests that both vessels and women are clad in iron by the same 'powerful machinery', and anticipates the appearance of 'steam-ewes' (by association with 'steam rams'), and maidens capable of sustaining an attack from an Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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gun.



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Issue 1063 (23 November 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 204.

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The New Photographic Looking-Glass

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Zoology, Human Species, Human Development, Race, Photography, Representation


    Shows a simian-looking middle-aged man sitting in his drawing room, whilst looking at a booklet entitled 'Portrait of a Gorilla', the inside of which is hidden. There are two young children in front of him who tease him with the words 'Ain't it a jolly sell, MR. O'TOOLE? but don't tell Ma when she comes down, 'cause she said I wasn't to show it YOU on any account!'. The rest of the caption invites the reader to refer to the 'widely-circulated "Portrait of the Gorilla", to be obtained at the nearest Photographers'. The choice of name for the man, who is meant to see himself mirrored in the gorilla photograph, reflects Punch's habit of implying that the Irish resemble apes.



Punch,  41 (1861), 205.

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Spartan Discipline at Woolwich

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Dialogue, Spoof

Subjects:

Nutrition, Sanitation, Health


Punch,  41 (1861), 206.

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Fashion for the Fireside. To Mrs J.

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Heat, Invention, Accidents


    The poet offers his wife, Mrs J., a 'fireproof dress', explaining how distressed he is by the possibility that she will be 'burnt alive' through the ignition of 'all that attire'. He explains the combustible nature of the muslin, but reassures her that she will be safe from fire by wearing a dress called 'Premature Suttee'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 212.

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Men and Bees

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Natural History, Human Species, Nutrition, Industry, Class


    Opens by describing how 'Working Bees' prepare honey in the summer and thus, 'by their toil', accumulate food to survive the cold winter, so that when they are 'Out of work' they are not 'out of victuals too'. Contrasts this to the less 'happier' 'Working Men', who earn 'Little more than bread and cheese', which they do not 'hoard', and whose 'produce [...] Goes for others to provide'. Ends by noting that while bees can 'sustenance command', 'Men can only help implore'. Calls on 'Masters' to follow the example of bees and 'Give a share to Working Men'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 213.

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The Policeman's Progress

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Lecturing, Physiology, Anatomy, Human Species, Crime

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Discusses a 'report of Naval and Military Intelligence' describing the lectures 'On the Physiology of Man' given to the policemen who patrol Chatham Dockyard Chatham Dockyard
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. Reveals that the lecturer, Mr Lichfield Lichfield, Mr (fl. 1861) PU1/41/21/5
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, is merely 'an uncommonly intelligent' police officer who, according to the report, showed himself to be 'thoroughly conversant with the subject'. Believes that the physiological subjects taught by Lichfield will give policemen 'abundant food for contemplation' and the ability to reflect on the 'beautiful framework of bones' and physiological mechanisms that he uses to catch criminals. Concludes by observing that the policeman has now 'begun to apprehend the facts of science', and 'not only commands progress in the thoroughfares, but exemplifies it in the walks of intellect'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 214.

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An Old Fable Newly Applied

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Comparative Philology, Animal Behaviour, Hunting, Politics, Religious Authority


    Dedicated 'to the Bench of Bishops, and the RIGHT HON. B. DISRAELI Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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, M.P.', this poem opens by recalling Aesop's Aesop (c. 6th century BC) CBD
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story about a time when 'All beasts could talk, that now go dumbly stalking', and adding that this did not just apply to 'the monkeys, owls, and asses merely, / Who still enjoy the privilege of talking'. Goes on to explain man's dissatisfaction with walking on his feet, and his quest for a suitable quadruped on which he could ride. After dismissing the stag as too delicate and uncomfortable to ride on, and too swift to catch, he identifies a colt as a more suitable animal for this purpose. The colt proceeds to vilify the habits of the stag (including its tendency to poison pasture grounds and poach meads) and agrees with the man, that they should 'combine in his pursuit'. Later, having frightened off the stag, the man disagrees with the horse's desire to 'catch the Deer', and after reminding the horse that he could only disagree with him when he had 'a will', he digs his spurs into the horse, and the horse is 'taken in'. In this story the horse rider is likened to Disraeli, who sought to 'deal' a foe a 'stroke stupendous', and the horse to 'old Mother Church' which found itself being ridden rather than hunting a stag.



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Issue 1064 (30 November 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 215.

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A Well-Wisher

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiology, Industry


    Reports on a Pennsylvania man who claims to be able to divine the existence of oil wells by the sense of smell.



Punch,  41 (1861), 215.

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The Plaint of the Club-Men

Lionel Rattlecash Rattlecash, Lionel
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Commerce, Class, Human Species, Human Development


    Agreeing with a Globe Globe (1803–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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article describing the 'hardships which this new Bankruptcy Act [...] will inflict upon swells and decent fellows', insists that 'every decent fellow is a member of some club, the Gorillas that ain't may take care of themselves', and laments that fact that such fellows suffer the 'monstrous injustice' of losing their club membership due to bankruptcy. This article trades on Paul B Du Chaillu's Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversial claims regarding the aggressive nature of gorillas.



Punch,  41 (1861), 216.

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Prize Wants

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Invention, Patronage, Technology


    Describes some of the inventions to awarded prizes by the Royal Society of Arts Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
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. These include 'a detonating or noise-making envelope' for drawing attention to somebody surreptitiously opening an envelope in search of valuable items, and a 'self-acting door mat' for impeding the progress of visitors.



Punch,  41 (1861), 216–17.

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A Starry Chain of Magic

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Astrology, Spiritualism, Mesmerism, Phrenology, Charlatanry, Commerce, Cultural Geography, Nationalism, Astronomy, Prognostication


    Inveighs against a series of advertisements from astrologers, clairvoyants and phrenologists published in the New York Herald New York Herald (1887–1900+) British Library Catalogue
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. Questions John Bright's Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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claim that inhabitants of the United States are 'far more advanced in the intellectual race than the benighted English' on the grounds that they cultivate 'a science which in England we have long branded by the rude name of Imposture' (216). Proceeds to ridicule the terms of business and alleged prophetic and divining powers claimed in nine advertisements by astrologers, clairvoyants, and phrenologists. In many cases it compares their trades to those practiced by 'the lowest class of so-called dentists' (216). In other cases, it burlesques the scientific pretensions of the advertisers. For example, responding to the claim of a Mrs Milton Milton, Mrs (fl. 1861) PU1/41/22/4
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to cure rheumatism by clairvoyance, it considers this process 'worthy [of] young America', but then wonders whether she 'also cuts corns Mesmerically, and hair Astrologically, when Berenice's Hair is in Trine occult opposition and projection with the "streaming locks so lovely pale" of the current Comet'. (217)



Punch,  41 (1861), 218.

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The Carte de Visite

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Photography, Publishing


    Shows a 'Gent' in a photographic studio who tells the photographer that he does not want his 'Cart' published but that he may sell it to 'any nice gal, or lady of rank'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 218.

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Louis Napoleon Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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Does Penance in a Balance-Sheet

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Military Technology, Commerce


Punch,  41 (1861), 222–23.

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Our Dramatic Correspondent

One Who Pays One Who Pays
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Amusement, Narcotics, Medical Treatment, Homeopathy, Crime


    Complains of the 'modern French abominations' of the stage—the portrayal of death by poisoning in melodramas. Prefers one character to kill another by more dramatic means than by slaying him 'by half inches with homeopathic doses', which produces 'the most distressing facial effects'. Prefers 'a bullet through the body, or a bludgeon-stroke behind the back' to 'poisoned puddings, and doctored doctor's stuff'. (222)



Punch,  41 (1861), 223.

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Debt to the Departed Brave

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Commerce


Punch,  41 (1861), 223.

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Copies for Physicians

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Accidents, Expertise, Methodology


    Discusses a letter in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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complaining about the poor quality of physicians' handwriting, a problem which can lead to fatally wrong doses being prescribed. Suggests that physicians 'return to those studies of penmanship' and presents some beautifully written examples of how they should prescribe treatment. The examples represent Punch's interpretation of physicians' aporisms: for example, 'Avoid Empiricism', 'Drugs are Deleterious', 'Humbug is unprofessional', and 'Nature alone cures'.



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Issue 1065 (7 December 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 226.

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Striking a Docket

Fanny B Williams Williams, Fanny B
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Analytical Chemistry


Punch,  41 (1861), 228.

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A Warning to Jonathan; or, 'Doth he Wag his Tail?'

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Politics


Punch,  41 (1861), 231.

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Sir Aesculapius Punch on Allmyeyeopathy

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Periodicals, Pharmaceuticals, Reading


    Opens by noting the medical students and 'zealous advocates of medical reform' who have asked his opinion on 'Allmyeyeopathy', a technique which he confesses to knowing 'but little' but insists is not secret. Goes on to liken the 'practice of physic' to a 'game of draughts' because it is speculative and involves 'solid and liquid draughts', adding that 'playing with one you are huffed for not taking a man, while with the other you may be huffed for losing him'. Noting the fear caused in patients by 'a medicated arsenal' and the high resistance of the 'constitution of man' to medicine, the author finally turns to the treatment of 'Allmyeyeopathy'. Explains that it 'acts directly on the diaphragm from whence its influence radiates to all the risible muscles' and is effected by exhibiting to the patient 'Punch's concentrated essence' (i.e. exposing the patient to Punch's jokes). Boasts of some individuals who have been cured by this remedy, including a statesman who, having 'lost his seat, after a violent struggle, and fell heavily in public estimation', took three-penny worth (the price of the periodical), and recovered. Concludes by emphasising the historical precedent for 'Allmyeyeopathy'—placebos—but points out that this one is the first to meet with 'uniform success'. Warns, however, that the essence must be taken regularly, but boasts that now 'Vis comica has succeeded to the business of vis medicatrix naturae', and strongly recommends the substance to medical practitioners.



Punch,  41 (1861), 232.

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Imogene's Apology

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Class


    Informs her cousins of her surprising decision to decline the offer of marriage to the dull and wealthy 'Lord Poppy', and her subsequent attachment to a surgeon. She explains that 'little I[mogene]'s now link'd to mortar and pestle' and 'dotes on the title of M.R.C.S', and although her beloved does not appear in Debrett 1802 Debrett, John 1802. The Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Ireland, 2 vols, London: F. C. & J. Rivington
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, she is looking forward to having her name on the brass plate of Dr Brown and travelling to the 'erudite soil' of Scotland.



Punch,  41 (1861), 233.

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Judicial Jokes on Copyright

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Zoology, Monstrosities


Punch,  41 (1861), 233.

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Pretty Poison-Wreaths

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Accidents, Adulteration, Narcotics, Manufactories, Industry


    Discusses a recent inquest at which it was revealed that a young woman died accidentally from arsenic to which she was exposed in her employment—the manufacture of artificial flower-leaves. Noting one juror's observation that 'the use of arsenite of copper in artificial flower-making was prohibited in France', cynically adds that this would be 'out of the question' for British manufacturers. Urges that the toxic chemical should be abolished and suggests that one way might be to get 'fast young men' to inspire in their dancing partners a sense for disgust of the poisoned wreaths that they wear.


See also:

Anon, 'Green Go the Lasses, O!', Punch, 41 (1861), 141


Punch,  41 (1861), 234.

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A Bad Case of Throwing Stones

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

War, Cultural Geography, Military Technology


    Shows John Bull, the allegorical figure of England, and an American military figure (possibly intended to be Abraham Lincoln Lincoln, Abraham (1809–65) CBD
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), standing on separated islands (representing different continents). John Bull warns the American that unless he apologises he will 'put the matter into the hands of my lawyers Messrs. WHITWORTH Whitworth, Sir Joseph, 1st Baronet (1803–87) ODNB
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and ARMSTRONG Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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'—a reference to the two most prominent British gun-makers of the period. The illustration refers to Britain's possible declaration of war on the Union states in response to perceived aggression.



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Issue 1066 (14 December 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 235.

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Music Without Noise

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Music, Instruments, Invention


    Puzzled by a handbill for 'AZÉMAR'S SILENT PRACTICE DRUM', explains that it has 'all the advantages of a real one for purposes of practice, but is also free from all the disadvantages of a drum which [...] makes a noise'. Goes on to explain how the instrument enables the drummer to develop accurate beating (principally by the vibrations transmitted from the drum to the leg). Considers the benefits of making silent versions of other instruments, and suggests that Mr Azémar Azémar, Mr (fl. 1861) PU1/41/24/1
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and Charles Babbage Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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should collaborate on such inventions.



Punch,  41 (1861), 237.

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American Spirit Merchants

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Commerce, Periodicals


    Discusses an advertisement for the American spiritualist periodical Herald of Progress Spiritual Telegraph (1852–60) Herald of Progress (1860–64) BUCOP
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, which it notes is edited by Andrew J Davis Davis, Andrew Jackson (1826–1910) WBI
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, who has now 'connected himself with a "Co."'. Supposes these business people are 'importers of revelations and spiritual articles in general from the other world', but thinks 'importers' might mean 'impostors'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 242.

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Model of the Disunited States

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Spiritualism, Cultural Geography


    Announces some of the 'objects' that America will contribute to the forthcoming International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. These include a 'Model of the Model Republic', 'accurate representations of Spiritual Circles, Tables for Spirit Rapping, and Spirits under the Tables'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 244.

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A Great Time for Ireland!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery; Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Nationalism, War, Animal Behaviour, Human Species, Human Development, Race, Mental Illness, Cultural Geography


    Begins by presenting an extract from the Irish nationalist newspaper, Nation Nation (1842–97) Weekly Nation (1897–1900) BUCOP
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, which, in 'anticipation of a war between this country and America', relishes the prospect of the English being defeated as they were at Fontenoy (in 1745, by the French) and avenged for their ruthless treatment of the Irish, and hopes for the establishment of an independent Ireland. Punch then presents its 'portrait of the Author', which shows him, a gorilla, sitting at a desk on which rests a copy of the Nation and a paper marked 'TREASON'. Behind him stands a police officer about to place a dunce's hat on the author's head. The caption affirms Punch's connection between subversive Irish nationalists and gorillas which, following the controversial claims of Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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, are both presented as 'savage'. The caption identifies the author as a 'Mr. G-O'Rilla, the Young Ireland Party, exulting over the insult to the British Flag', and asks: 'Shouldn't he be extinguished at once?'.


See also:

Anon, 'The Lion of the Season', Punch, 40 (1861), [213]


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Issue 1067 (21 December 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 245.

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The Irish Yahoos

Anon

Genre:

Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Politics, War, Animal Behaviour, Human Species, Human Development, Mental Illness


    Discusses a meeting of the Irish 'Yahoos' at the 'Pope's Head' for celebrating England's likely involvement in the American Civil War. The savage nature of participants is represented by their collective description as 'Yahoos' (a reference to the savage humans in Swift 1726 [Swift, Jonathan] 1726. Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, 2 vols, London, B. Motte
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), by the abusive and inarticulate abuse that the chairman, O'Donoghyahoo, hurls at 'the Saxon', the 'frantic howling', 'convulsive laughter', and other animal noises made by the group, and by the fact that some of the Yahoos bear the names of simians, notably Mr O'Rangoutang and Mr G. O'Rilla. Describes how some of the Yahoos 'gloated on the calamities which they anticipated for England' and notes how, at the end of the meeting, the Yahoos shouted 'hurroos for the POPE Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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and CAPTAIN WILKS Wilkes, Charles (1798–1877) CBD
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' and abuse at Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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and John Bull, and left the meeting engaging in more animal behaviour. In conclusion, notes that the Yahoo is a 'creature between the mongrel and the baboon'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 245.

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Something Like Manners

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Race, Animal Behaviour, Cultural Geography, Human Species, Human Development, Extinction


    Recollects a story of an Irishman who, having been run over by a bishop's carriage, merely asked 'What's that for'? Expresses concern that he and other members of this 'docile race' have become extinct—a reference to Punch's recurrent linkage of Irish nationalism and savagery. However, it suggests evidence contrary to this trend: a report of gentlemanly behaviour shown by an Irishman towards some ladies whom he ran over in Dublin.



Punch,  41 (1861), 247.

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Enlarging the Area of a Policeman's Duties

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Agriculture, Statistics


Punch,  41 (1861), 248.

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Commercial Slang

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Language, Nutrition, Narcotics


    Discusses entries in trade reports, including one describing 'active' tea, and speculates on the medicinal and poisonous activity of the drink.



Punch,  41 (1861), 251.

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Photographic Caricatures at Rome

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Photography, Religious Authority, Crime


    Discusses a 'letter from Rome' describing how the Catholic authorities in Rome have made 'the art of photography' illegal unless authorised by the Cardinal Vicar of Rome, Costantino Patrizi Patrizi, Costantino (d. 1876) WBI
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. Describes the punishment to be meted out to offenders, and reveals that the extreme measure followed the publication of 'some very scandalous photographic representations' in which the heads of leading Catholics were 'placed on the bodies of other individuals'. Wonders whether Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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would have intervened had the photographs of his enemies been manipulated in the same way.



Punch,  41 (1861), 252.

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A Dish of Lava

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Vulcanology, Geology, Quackery, Politics


    Expresses disappointment with Mount Vesuvius for erupting so furiously at a delicate moment in Italian politics (a reference to the invasion of Sicily and Naples by Giuseppe Garibaldi Garibaldi, Giuseppe (1807–82) CBD
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). Notes some of the other celebrated eruptions of the volcano and condemns its actions as familiar and monotonous. Suggests, with some 'scorn', treating it with the 'remedies against eruptions' supplied by 'several quacks in England'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 253.

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The American Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Cultural Geography, Physical Geography, Natural History, Animal Behaviour, Human Species, Human Development, Politics


    Explaining that the directors of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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are expecting contributions from the Northern States of America, presents a list of some of the articles to be expected. These include 'The American Eagle' with its 'natural food' ('bunkum'), 'Regular Opossums' and other 'curiosities of American natural history', 'A B'hoy', who will make an interesting comparison 'with his superior' but related genus, the gorilla, and 'Specimens of American Apes, and Naturalised Irishmen, stuffed'. The list makes implicit reference to the controversy over the aggressive nature of the gorilla, and draws connections between the behaviour of these animals and the violent anti-British behaviour of Americans and Irish nationalists.



Punch,  41 (1861), 253.

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Love and Arsenic

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Adulteration, Narcotics, Gender


    Draws a comparison between a 'Painted Indian' pursuing an enemy in a forest and a 'Sparkling Flirt' pursuing a lover at a 'mazy dance'. They differ in their aims but have similar means: the Indian uses 'an arrow tipped with bane' but the flirt uses a wreath clad in 'arsenious verdure'—a reference to the recent discovery that artificial flowers worn by women contain potentially fatal amounts of arsenic. Draws parallels between knightly chivalry and the fate of women wearing poisonous wreaths.



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Issue 1068 (28 December 1861)Expand    Contract

Punch,  41 (1861), 256.

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No Vent Peg Required

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Drollery

Subjects:

Periodicals, Health, Reading


    Puffs Punch's Almanack Punch's Almanack (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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as 'so fine a spirit of wit' that exposure to the air will not destroy its qualities, adding that 'they form a strengthening and wholesome mental diet' which 'no family or single person ought to be without'.



Punch,  41 (1861), 257.

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Men and Monkeys

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery; Illustration, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Zoology, Controversy, Human Species, Human Development, Language


    Insists that Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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(if he is believed in spite of John E Gray's Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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rebuttals) 'must have lived in a queer society in Africa'. Adds that the 'animal and human' 'brutes' that he found there 'bear no little resemblance' to people in 'far more civilised localities', especially in central England. Provides several examples of this, including the 'uncle-hunters, who have done their best to worry those rich relatives to death, having bled them (through their bankers) as much as well was possible'. Adds that the 'nest-building ape' which Du Chaillu claims to have discovered has a 'civilised' equivalent: the men who, with as much skill as the ape, make 'nests and know well how to feather them', and who share with the nest-building ape the tendency to spend much of their time 'up a tree' (i.e. hard up). Observes that 'customs' considered 'savage, brutal, and inhuman' in gorillas are 'actually applauded' in civilised communities, including living 'on one's relations' and asking how a deceased rich man will 'cut up' (how his estate will be divided). Concludes that although 'we may boast of our superior intelligence', there are still some 'Educated Englishmen' who 'behave themselves in no way better than Gorillas'. The illustration shows a gorilla being measured for a suit by a decidedly 'Agitated Tailor', who complains about the length of his customer's arm.



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