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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 42  (January to June 1862)

Punch,  42 (1862), [i].

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Punch Vol XLII

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Medical Treatment, Periodicals, Reading, Race, Amusement, Internationalism


    Shows Mr Punch (clad in his court jester garments) serving glasses of liquid from a large bowl marked 'The Very Best of Physic', a reference to Punch's belief in its therapeutic qualities. The bowl is surrounded by representatives of various nations and in the background can be seen the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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.



Punch,  42 (1862), [v–vii].

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Introduction

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness | Mining, Accidents | Zoological Gardens


    Summarises an article on the long-running inquiry into the 'mental competency of William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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conducted by the Commissioner in Lunacy, Samuel Warren Warren, Samuel (1807–77) ODNB
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(see Anon, 'Law and Lunacy', Punch, 42 (1862), [35]), and an article on a 'terrible' explosion at Hartley Colliery Hartley Colliery, near Newcastle-upon-Tyne
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, near Newcastle-upon-Tyne (see , Anon, 'Only One Word', Punch, 42 (1862), 50).



Issue 1068* (  ) 'Punch's Almanack for 1862'Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), [i].

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The Calendar

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners

People mentioned:

Benjamin Franklin, Franklin, Benjamin (1706–90) DSB
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Joseph Priestley, Priestley, Joseph (1733–1804) DSB
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Nicholas Copernicus, Copernicus, Nicholas (1473–1543) DSB
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Georges Cuvier, Cuvier, Georges (1769–1832) DSB
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Auguste Comte Comte, Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier (Auguste) (1798–1857) DSB
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Punch,  42 (1862), [ii].

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Caution to Footmen

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Human Species, Animal Behaviour, Race


Punch,  42 (1862), [ii].

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Song by Mr Sowerby. On Spirit-Painting. To a Lady

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Photography


Punch,  42 (1862), [iv].

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Fact for All Fools' Day

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Exploration, Physical Geography, Language

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Geographical Society Royal Geographical Society
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Punch,  42 (1862), [v].

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Sanitary Directions for Servants (For the Housemaid)

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Instructions, Drollery

Subjects:

Sanitation, Health


Punch,  42 (1862), [v].

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Positive Fact, of Course

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Gender, Domestic Economy, Superstition


    Shows a woman standing on a stool on the flat area between the roofs of two houses. Above her are some telegraph lines on which she has evidently been hanging her washing. Much to her surprise, she sees a large cloth hanging on the line with a message from her husband. The illustration plays on contemporary perceptions that messages sent through lines were inscribed on tangible objects such as rolled up pieces of paper.



Punch,  42 (1862), [vi].

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Ballad from Bedlam Bethlehem Royal Hospital
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Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Natural History


Punch,  42 (1862), [vi].

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Physiological Fact

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiology, Comparative Philology


Punch,  42 (1862), [vi].

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Hint on Gardening

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture


Punch,  42 (1862), [vi].

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Geography for Girls

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Gender


Punch,  42 (1862), [viii].

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Medical Domestic Economy

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Nutrition, Human Development


Punch,  42 (1862), [viii].

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[Jones has an Equestrian Portrait for his Carte de Visite]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Photography


Punch,  42 (1862), [ix].

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The Vestry Fiat

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Transport, Progress, Railways


Punch,  42 (1862), [x].

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A Fool's Advice

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Astrology

People mentioned:

Richard J Morrison Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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Punch,  42 (1862), [x].

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Natural Indignation

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Exploration, Controversy


    Explains that the reason Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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got 'so angry as he did when he was chaffed about the Gorilla' was because 'his monkey was up'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [x].

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Legislation of the Safety Lamp

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mining, Accidents, Light, Invention


    Urges that an act should be passed requiring 'every miner on descending into the coal pit, shall [...] take his Davy Davy, Sir Humphry, Baronet (1778–1829) DSB ODNB
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[i.e. his Davy lamp]'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [x].

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Sanitary Directions for Servants (For the Nursemaid)

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Instructions, Drollery

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Health, Human Development, Sanitation


    Includes the advice that 'the hotter your nursery the better, or the children will catch cold', and 'Always give children whatever they cry for. Nature teaches them to express their wants, which it would be cruelty to thwart'. Also, 'Wash the floor of the nursery often. The evaporation will assimilate the atmosphere indoors to that outside, and save the children from sudden changes of temperature'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [xi].

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Sanitary Directions for Servants (For the Cook.)

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Instructions, Drollery

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Health, Sanitation, Disease, Putrefaction


    Includes advice such as 'Nail down your kitchen windows. It is the only way to avoid draughts, colds, and face-aches'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [xi].

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A Voice from the Gorilla

Our Own Brute Our Own Brute
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Genre:

Extract, Essay, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Human Development, Education, Gender


    Insists that the 'softening influence' that 'female society' is supposed to exert is 'softening [...] to the brain'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [xi].

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One Good Turn Deserves Another

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Human Species, Amusement, Music


    Shows a gorilla turning, with one hand, the handle of a barrel organ, and holding, in the other hand, a rope to which is attached an organ grinder. The caption explains this clever role-reversal following claims regarding the intelligence of simians: 'The lazy organ grinders have had it all their own way with the monkeys—now then—change about!'.



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Issue 1069 (4 January 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 8.

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'As Mad as a Hatter'

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Government


    Suggests that Samuel Warren Warren, Samuel (1807–77) ODNB
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'or some equally eminent Master in Lunacy' should investigate 'the particular madness that hatters are subject to'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 9.

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Homeopathy in Hydrophobia

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Vaccination, Medical Treatment


    Reports on a paper read by M Toutmonoeil Toutmonoeil, M (fl. 1862) PU1/42/1/2
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at the Académie des Sciences, Paris Académie des Sciences, Paris
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, on 'the proposed treatment of hydrophobia on the homeopathic principle that like cures like'. Explains how Toutmonoeil intends to inoculate patients bitten by dogs with the poison of a rattlesnake, but that the savant has not been able to find anybody willing to submit to his experiments.



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Issue 1070 (11 January 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 11.

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Entertainment For an Organ-Grinding Ruffian

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Amusement, Music


Punch,  42 (1862), 11.

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A Prize Income-Tax for 1862

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Commerce


    Argues that the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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should include non-material articles including 'political and social inventions' and those of a 'moral and scientific character'. Suggests awarding a prize for 'the producer of an equitable Income-Tax' and calls on a 'financier, arithmetician, or mathematician' to solve this problem.



Punch,  42 (1862), 11.

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Questions in Lunacy Cases

Anon

Genre:

Dialogue, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Mental Illness

Institutions mentioned:

Eastern Counties Railway Company Eastern Counties Railway Company
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Punch,  42 (1862), 12–13.

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The Debates on the Grand Remonstrance.

Mr Punch Punch, Mr
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Genre:

Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Mathematics, Education


Punch,  42 (1862), 13.

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Amateur Engine-Drivers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Expertise, Mental Illness, Accidents, Charlatanry


    Discusses a letter in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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from J B Owen Owen, J B (fl. 1862) PU1/42/2/5
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, secretary of the Eastern Counties Railway Company Eastern Counties Railway Company
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, who sought to reassure a correspondent that William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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, who had bribed his way into impersonating a guard on an Eastern Counties locomotive, had not managed to drive the train. Thinks the public needs to know whether such 'fast young men' as Windham have endangered their lives by driving engines for amusement.



Punch,  42 (1862), 17.

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A Small Words for the Small Birds

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Hunting, Environmentalism, Cruelty, Natural History, Agriculture, Ornithology


    Noting newspaper reports of the large number of birds, rabbits, mice, and other animals caught in France, discusses a 'petition from a number of French naturalists' protesting against the hunting of birds on the grounds that this action increases the number of 'cockroaches and caterpillars' and other insects that wreak havoc on corn and fruit crops. Notes that the petition urged 'les Sportmen' to confine their killing to 'rather larger game'. Presents an extract from a letter in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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expressing similar views to the French naturalists. Concludes by calling for an end to 'this suicidal hedgerow warfare' and noting Mr Punch's intention to shoot any knave caught taking 'pot-shots' at sparrows.



Punch,  42 (1862), 20.

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Humphrey and Humbug

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astrology, Charlatanry, Government, Prognostication


    Criticizes London alderman John Humphery's Humphery, John (1794–1863) WBI
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puffing of Richard J Morrison's Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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supposedly correct prediction regarding the death of a 'distinguished person'. Claims Punch Punch (1841–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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had contemplated ordering its own 'astrologer' to 'prophesy a "fearful misfortune"' for Humphrey, until it learnt how he had attacked the astrologer Robert C Smith Smith, Robert Cross ('Raphael') (1795–1832) ODNB
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.



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Issue 1071 (18 January 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 21.

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Artful!

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Photography


Punch,  42 (1862), 23.

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Our Dramatic Correspondent

One Who Pays One Who Pays
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Amusement, Display, Instruments, Education, Astronomy, Pneumatics, Light


    Questions the claim that 'an evening with an Orrery or some stale Dissolving Views, or a nice long-winded lecture about Optics or Pneumatics, the Air-Pump or the Diving-Bell, is now far more to the taste of the rising generation than the frivolous and uninstructive pleasures of the stage'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 24.

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Needless Trouble

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Animal Behaviour, Controversy, Language, Cultural Geography


    Presenting an extract from an article in the Oswestry Advertiser Oswestry Advertiser (1849–88) Waterloo Directory
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which describes the engagements of the 'Llanddyfan and Llanfairmathafarnneithaf choirs', the author professes to be 'tired of the DU CHAILLU Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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controversy' and does not want to bother friends with more information about the 'Gorilla countries', amongst which these Welsh locations are included.



Punch,  42 (1862), 27.

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Where Such Things are Bought

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery; News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Zoology, Controversy, Photography, Commerce


    The initial letter is made from an illustration showing a gorilla dressed in the costume of a peasant (possibly an Irishman), entering a door marked 'GRAY VISITORS', a reference to John E Gray Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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. The text acknowledges that 'the Gorilla Portrait Sell is not a bad one', but thinks what is neater is 'one of Mr. Punch's young men', who, on being offered a copy of the portrait, replied, '"Nos etiam in Arcadiâ"—"I too have been in the Lowther Arcade Lowther Arcade, Strand
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"' (where gorilla portraits were sold).



Punch,  42 (1862), 28.

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Preaching and Playing

Gravitas Gravitas
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Lecturing, Religious Authority, Animal Behaviour, Zoology


    Discussing the need for clergymen to develop their oratorical skills in the theatre, the author points out that he does not intend clergymen to rehearse comic parts, although these would 'serve admirably to train up a candidate for the Metropolitan Tabernacle Metropolitan Tabernacle
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in the way he should preach, or lecture on Shrews and the Gorilla'—a reference to Charles H Spurgeon's Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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lectures on those subjects.



Punch,  42 (1862), 29.

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Blackie on his Breed

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Language, Nationalism, Cultural Geography, Human Species, Human Development, Animal Behaviour


    Discusses a report of John S Blackie's Blackie, John Stuart (1809–95) ODNB
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recent lecture on the 'nationality and character' of the Scots. Notes ascription by James Burnett (Lord Monboddo) Burnett, James, Lord Monboddo (bap. 1714–99) ODNB
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of 'tails to aboriginal Scots, in common with the rest of mankind'. Reports that Blackie has reduced the Scot to a lower level, considering him to be an 'animal' with several characteristics, including 'working', being 'enterprising and adventurous', 'practical and utilitarian', and 'earnest, serious, devout, and religious'. Concludes by opining that 'Calvinism was the religion of a brute' and anticipates that a Cockney might characterise the Scot as 'an animal ordained by nature to graze on the prickly herbage of the Land of Thistles'.



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Issue 1072 (25 January 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 31.

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Salisbury Hamilton, Walter Kerr (1808–1869) ODNB
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and Jeroboam

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Natural History, Human Development


Punch,  42 (1862), 33.

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Insanity in the Federal Camp

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Disease, War, Medical Treatment, Mental Illness


    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of two Union military generals in America who used homeopathy to treat their diseases with some success. Believes that because they have submitted to homeopathy they are not fit to 'direct military operations' and that there is a danger that it will be 'all gone goose with the Federal cause'. Adds that the only reason for thinking that the homeopathic treatment was 'anything but humbug' was the observation that it seemed to aggravate the condition of one of the patients, and accordingly suggests that homeopathy is a 'cause of disease'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 34.

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Miscellaneous

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Invention, Nutrition


    Includes a report of an 'ingenious American mechanic' who has invented a machine for preparing a man for the breakfast table without waking him.



Punch,  42 (1862), [35].

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Law and Lunacy

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Government


    Subtitled 'Or, A Glorious Oyster Season for the Lawyers', this illustration shows a crowd of lawyers eating oysters, surrounding a wooden tub marked 'LUNATICO INQUIRY'. In front of the tub stands the allegorical figure of British Justice. This is a reference to the ongoing inquiry into the mental competency of William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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, an inquiry featuring testimony from some of the greatest lawyers of the day, and which provided a wonderful opportunity (an 'Oyster Season') for English barristers.



Punch,  42 (1862), 40.

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Progress in Case of Peace

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Commerce, War, Pollution, Sanitation, Public Health, Exhibitions, Nationalism, Cultural Geography, Engineering, Agriculture


    Questioning the costly 'war-preparations' (against the United States), emphasises the amount of work there is to do in Britain, including the need to 'hold a position in our Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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', as well as the 'draining' of London, the construction of the Thames Embankment Thames Embankment
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, the purification of the Thames, and the 'utilisation of sewage'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 40.

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New American Work

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Commerce, Evolution, Extinction


    In a play on the title of Darwin 1859 Darwin, Charles Robert 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, London: John Murray
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, announces the publication of a work by Charles R Darwin Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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on 'the Extinction of Specie, dedicated to the Secretary of the Treasury and the Bankers of New York'—a reference to the great financial debt into which America has sunk as a result of the Civil War.



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Issue 1073 (1 February 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 41.

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Governesses for the Imbecile

Number One Number One
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Commerce, Gender


    Criticizes the amount of money (£15–£20,000) spent on the legal case to determine whether 'a young man', William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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, 'is insane or no in order to decide as to his fitness for managing his affairs'. Points out that 'Every wild young man almost is unfit to manage his affairs' and so 'proper people should be appointed to take care of his estates' and he should be made 'incapable of running into debt or of marrying without the consent of his guardians'. The writer believes that if one of her seven daughters were to marry a 'simpleton' she would enjoy a quiet life, and in a postscript asks for a 'rich imbecile young man that would suit my child' for 'the only true Asylum for Idiots is Woman's Heart'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 42.

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Quack Against Quack

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Disease, Gender


    Discusses two extracts from a 'contemporary' (i.e. another periodical). The first puffs 'DU BUNCOMBE'S Du Buncombe, Mr (fl. 1862) PU1/42/5/2
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Delicious Health Restoring Polenta Syriaca Food' as an alternative to expensive, harmful, and ineffective 'pills and other medicines' used for gastric disorders. The second puffs 'GULLOWAY'S' (i.e. Thomas Holloway's Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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) pills as unsurpassed solutions for 'regulating digestion'. Points out that these extracts appeared without headings and might be taken to be editorial statements, and goes on to stress the contradictions between them. Believes that 'Old women and others who have read the foregoing contradictory species of puffery, will be as much puzzled as wiser persons are by the opposite tenets of numerous gentlemen who sign the thirty-nine articles, and yet unite in condemning DR. ROWLAND WILLIAMS Williams, Rowland (1817–70) ODNB
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'. The reference is to the prosecution of Williams, starting in December 1861, for contributions to Temple 1860 [Temple, Frederick et al.] 1860. Essays and Reviews, London: J. W. Parker
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considered by the Anglican authorities to be contrary to the church's teachings on the plenary and verbal inspiration of the Bible.



Punch,  42 (1862), 42.

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Helmets for Peace Heroes

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Crime, Invention, Health


    Discusses an improved design for the policeman's helmet which, unlike the traditional design which tends to overheat, 'unites ventilation with elegance'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 44.

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The I. O. U. Indian

Anon

Genre:

Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Ethnology, Race, War, Commerce, Cultural Geography, Human Species, Animal Behaviour


    Summarises a paper putatively given at the Ethnological Society Ethnological Society of London
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on the 'manners, habits, and destinies of the American tribe of I.O.U. Indians', who turn out to be Old World white settlers who have gained a reputation of not repaying debts. Noting the English origins of the tribe, explains that the 'deteriorating influences of climate, and still more a vast infusion of inferior animalism, in the form of convict Irish, deboshed Germans, and the accumulated scum of other nations, combined to demoralise the Englishman, and a few generations have brought him more and more closely into assimilation with the aboriginal Indians of the Western Continent'. Goes on to discuss some of the other disagreeable characteristics of tribe members, including their 'strange hatred for the black man', but thinks that exposure to 'European civilisation' will redeem the tribe.



Punch,  42 (1862), 50.

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Only One Word

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Poetry

Subjects:

Mining, Accidents


    Referring to a tragic explosion at the Hartley Colliery Hartley Colliery, near Newcastle-upon-Tyne
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near Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the poet asks that the 'sad Survivors' of the disaster be made 'Miners too, / To work, through life, a gold-mine oped by you'.



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Issue 1074 (8 February 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 51.

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Specially Retained

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Crime, Medical Practitioners

People mentioned:

William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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Punch,  42 (1862), 52.

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Appendix to Darwin's Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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Origin of Species Darwin, Charles Robert 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, London: John Murray
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Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiognomy, Evolution, Race, Exploration


    Notes the observation made by 'several scientific observers' that 'the physiognomy of the American of the United States is beginning to exhibit a resemblance to that of the Red Indian', a development signified by the Confederate army's 'barbarous act' of sinking a stone fleet at Charleston Harbour (Fort Sumter). Anticipates that Thomas B Macaulay's Macaulay, Thomas Babington, 1st Baron Macaulay (1800–59) ODNB
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'New Zealander' would find New York inhabited by Americans who have descended to the America Indian 'level of humanity'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 52.

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Animal Spirits

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour


Punch,  42 (1862), 54.

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The Arsenic Waltz

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Narcotics, Adulteration, Disease, Gender


    Another representation of the alarming evidence showing the harmful quantities of arsenic used in making the artificial leaves in women's wreaths. It shows a skeleton of a woman clad in a large crinoline dress with the suspect wreath, being invited to a dance by the skeleton of a man dressed in evening wear.



Punch,  42 (1862), 59.

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'Still Harping'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Light, Instruments, Amusement | Invention, Sanitation, Patronage, Government


    The initial letter of the text is formed from an illustration showing a magic lantern projecting an image—of Mr Punch pursuing a street musician—into the distance. The text concerns a spoof letter from Charles Francis Adams to Harper Twelvetrees on the subject of the United States government's patronage of Twelvetrees's washing crystals, bug-powders, and other inventions.



Punch,  42 (1862), 59.

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Lesion of the Lungs of London

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Dissection, Analogy, Environmentalism, Exhibitions, Industry, Commerce, Materialism


    Describes a proposed 'incision' to the 'right lung'—Kensington Gardens Kensington Gardens
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—of London. Explains that this cut will be deep in order to establish communication between Bayswater and Kensington Gore, a decision informed by the demands of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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, and thus illustrating the sacrifice of 'natural objects' for 'material interests' and 'manufactures of a rich and magnificent kind'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 60.

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A Wooden Homeopathist

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Botany, Disease, Medical Treatment


    Noting the appearance of a 'Tree Doctor', suggests that he 'prescribes nothing' to the sick tree but a 'course of bark'.



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Issue 1075 (15 February 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 61.

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The Biggest of Butcher Boys

Anon

Genre:

Review, Drollery

Publications reviewed:

Fullom 1862 Fullom, Stephen Watson 1862. History of William Shakespeare, Player and Poet: With New Facts and Traditions, London: Saunders, Otley and Co.
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Language, Genius, Supernaturalism


    Concentrates on the author's claim that William Shakespeare Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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acquired his profound knowledge of slang through attendance at law courts, and notes the possibility that the playwright's knowledge of slang was so extensive that he acquired it 'by the study of everything, by intuition', or because he was a medium. Insists that the playwright's 'genius towers above the mediocrity that marks the utterances of the most eminent "mediums"' and can be explained in terms of a 'natural clairvoyance', which 'enabled him to look into all manner of things'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 64.

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Comfortable Concerts

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Music, Display, Human Species, Animal Behaviour


    Complains about the type of person who 'stumps' noisily out of concert halls during a musical performance, and considers that 'such a Gorilla is a monster whom it were gross flattery to call a selfish beast'. Applauds 'all champions who fight against these monsters, and lend a helping hand to make their race extinct'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 64.

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Unjennerous Objection

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Vaccination, Heroism


    Noting the opposition to the movement of the statue of Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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, suggests that 'surely the inventor of vaccination has the best possible right to make experiments on various spots'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 68.

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Spare the Woods and Forests

Smelfungus Smelfungus
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Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Environmentalism, Nationalism, Hunting, Development, Evolution, Animal Behaviour, Aesthetics, Pollution, Industry


    Urges that trees be preserved and despairs at the day when the 'woodman's stroke' will have destroyed all forests. Upholds the 'merry greenwood' that is ridiculed by 'Folly's mocking brood', and observes how 'every lover of copse and cover' will lament the hunting of animals as the trees are felled. Goes on to criticise the construction of buildings on village greens and commons, actions that suggest that the race is 'sinking to Gorillas'. Anticipates the transformation of 'fields and towns' into 'a close hotbed' and in conclusion ponders the possibility of thwarting the 'ruin and wreck / Of all old English beauty', polluted by 'traffic and trade', and mammon.



Punch,  42 (1862), 69.

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'Let the Swan Alone'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Encyclopaedias, Taxonomy, Charlatanry


    Presenting an advertisement for a projected 'SHAKESPEARE Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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CYCLOPAEDIA' containing the playwright's allusions to such scientific subjects as zoology, botany, and mineralogy, criticises the work as 'humbug' on the grounds that Shakespeare cannot be considered a 'cyclopaedic authority'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 69.

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One Word for Him, Two for Us

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Controversy, Periodicals


    Discusses the Athenaeum's Athenaeum (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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quotation from, and praise for, a poem attacking Paul B Du Chaillu Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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'of Gorilladom', but criticises the periodical for wrongly assuming that the poem was written by Thomas Moore Moore, Thomas (1779–1852) ODNB
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.



Punch,  42 (1862), 74.

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Python Parturiens

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Development, Zoology, Zoological Gardens, Breeding, Education


    Following news that the python at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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is now 'incubating more than 100 eggs', this poem opens by calling for preparations to be made for 'this great egg-sample', and for Fellows of the Zoological Society Zoological Society of London
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to 'endorse their tickets' for 'Mrs. Python'. Compares this number of eggs to the single egg once laid in the gardens by a viper, and anticipates how 'a GRAY Gray, John Edward (1800–75) ODNB
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or OWEN Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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' will observe changes to the 'scaly family brood'. Likens the 'unwinding' of the 'closely-woven tails' to a W Wilkie Collins Collins, William Wilkie (1824–89) ODNB
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narrative, and then compares the python to an attorney who is 'strong to squeeze at will, / With coils as slippery as their gripe is stout'. Goes on to note that Owen will be instructing the young pythons 'how to coil', and anticipates their development from school students to species 'As vicious as the wildest of their kin'. Anticipates how the pythons will be 'as thick as bores are now' and be seen swinging from trees, and notes the beneficial effect of sunshine on egg development.



Punch,  42 (1862), 78.

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A Companion to the Peerage

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiology, Class, Disease, Heredity, Race, Medical Treatment, Human Species, Microscopy, Human Development, Prehistory, Palaeontology


    Discusses an announcement of a medical work that describes the 'BLOOD OF THE ARISTOCRACY' (Evans 1861 Evans, William Washington 1861. The Blood of the Aristocracy: Its Origin. Pure Blood: Its Origin. Disease: Its Origin. Health: Its Origin. And Beauty: Its Origin, London: Houlston and Wright
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). Interprets the announcement to mean that aristocrats' blood is 'very pure' but 'contains the seeds of eruptive complaints, of the nervous system and respiratory and digestive organs'. Wonders whether such blood contains 'finer globules than that of the common people' or 'a principle of honour' which might be given such names as 'Race', 'Pedigrine', and 'Nobbine'. Goes on to consider the effects of tranfusing the blood of one aristocrat into another, and concludes that the origin of the 'pure blood' of an aristocrat would be an 'interesting subject of inquiry' if that individual were a 'king of men' and 'chipped the flints in the drift'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 78.

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How to Train Up a Child

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Human Development, Railways, Mental Illness


    Argues that the best way to train a child is to make it behave in a disorderly fashion on a railway train (a reference to the trial of William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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) which 'may lead him to a commission of lunacy' and allow him to 'run through his property' faster than a railway.



Punch,  42 (1862), 78.

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What is Food for the Body and Food for the Mind?

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Philosophy


    'BACON Bacon, Francis, 1st Viscount St Alban (1561–1626) DSB ODNB
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'.



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Issue 1076 (22 February 1862)Expand    Contract

No Articles Indexed

^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1077 (1 March 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 82–83.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Animal Development, Zoology, Zoological Gardens, Politics, Government, Lecturing, Education, Astronomy


    The initial letter is formed by two large pythons together with a crocodile standing on its hind legs. One of the pythons is seen curling itself around an egg, a reference to the large number of eggs recently produced by the python at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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. The article opens with a report on the introduction by Richard Bethell (1st Baron Westbury) Bethell, Richard, 1st Baron Westbury (1800–73) ODNB
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of the Conveyancing Reform Bill into Parliament Houses of Parliament
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, in which Punch notes how Westbury explained himself 'in the broad fashion in which PROFESSOR FARADAY Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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lectures the Juveniles in Albermarle Street' (i.e. at the Royal Institution Royal Institution of Great Britain
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). Also considers Westbury's belief that Britain's greatest lawyers had little knowledge of feoffment to be as unreasonable as supposing that because Faraday told his juvenile audience that the earth is round 'he does not know that its is flattened at the poles'. (82) Later, responds to news that the government will 'take up' a 'Bill for suppressing the Fraudulent Imitation of Trade-Marks' by urging it to 'be an Egg which the Pythoness of Parliament will not Addle'. Returns to the python theme by supporting George Grey's Grey, Sir George (1799–1882) ODNB
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argument against amending the 'Cab Laws' and relating the author's observation of the 'delicate attention' given by cabmen to their 'lady employers' who had visited the python. (83)



Punch,  42 (1862), 83.

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'As Mad as a March Hare'

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Human Development


    Attributes this 'malady' to 'a harum-scarum young fellow' who is clearly William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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.



Punch,  42 (1862), 84, 87.

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'A Warning to Westbury'

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Animal Behaviour


    Urges Richard Bethell (1st Baron Westbury) Bethell, Richard, 1st Baron Westbury (1800–73) ODNB
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to pause before pressing his bill 'To clip the wings of Land-transfer's cost, / And disable conveyancer's skill'. Considers his actions to be as dangerous as thrusting an 'unguarded arm / In a knot of rattle-snakes, coiling warm'. (84)



Punch,  42 (1862), [85].

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The Parliamentary Python

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Animal Development


    Shows Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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and John Russell (1st Earl Russell) Russell, Lord John, 1st Earl Russell (1792–1878) ODNB
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looking at a large python curled in front of the mace in the House of Commons House of Commons
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. Playing on the news of the large number of eggs produced by the python at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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, the snake is seen curled around several eggs on which are written the names of the government's bills: for example, bills on lunacy and law reform. Palmerston and Russell exchange views on the possible fate of the 'eggs' while Benjamin Disraeli Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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, with his back to the python, remarks 'All addled no doubt'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 90.

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The Hooks and Eyes and Charity

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Alchemy


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Issue 1078 (8 March 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 92–93.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Race, Animal Behaviour, Cultural Geography, Astrology, Mental Illness, Government, Politics, Lecturing, Education


    Reports on Robert Peel's Peel, Sir Robert, 3rd Baronet (1822–1895) ODNB
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criticism of the Irish politician Daniel O'Donaghue O'Donaghue, Daniel (fl. 1862) PU1/42/9/1
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for his attack on Queen Victoria Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and Empress of India (1819–1901) ODNB
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. Notes that 'the species' of which O'Donaghue 'is a type cannot speak, as is well known to the negroes and other naturalists, but can fight', but considers the Irish politician's later 'sensible' remarks to suggest that he will one day improve himself, 'as MR. DARWIN Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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might say, into positive Rationality'. Later, in an allusion to astrologers Richard J Morrison Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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and Robert C Smith Smith, Robert Cross ('Raphael') (1795–1832) ODNB
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and millenarian divine John Cumming Cumming, John (1807–81) ODNB
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, reports that one of 'MR. ZADKIEL-URIEL-RAPHAEL-CUMMING PUNCH'S Prophecies' has been fulfilled, namely the introduction of a 'Bill for Amending the Law of Lunacy', a measure following the case of William F Windham Windham, William F (1840–66) WBI
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. The bill includes the clause that 'The doctors are not to be sent for, except when other evidence as to facts cannot be had, and then they are to swear as to what they know, instead of delivering highly improving and scientific lectures on the theory of insanity'. (92)



Punch,  42 (1862), 93.

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Stagnation at Winchester

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Sanitation, Government, Engineering, Palaeontology, Public Health


    Discusses news that Winchester Town Council Winchester Town Council
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has agreed to resist an inquiry into the cost of sewerage for the town. Presents statements from various aldermen of the town who testify to the health and cleanliness of the city, and the absurdity of installing drainage. Concludes that Winchester is a 'stronghold of anti-drainists' and 'if it does not become also the stronghold of typhus and scarlatina, the Board of Health General Board of Health
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is a big mistake'. Notes that a Winchester town councillor would not be 'diddled into drainage' and would only agree to 'a partial drainage [...] for convenience [...] but not on account of health', and thinks this individual is 'a Megatherium, if that Great Beast were discoverable in the Winchester Chalk Formation'. Concludes by noting how much this chalk would be 'enriched' by the 'treasures' that 'waste their sweetness on the Winton air'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 97.

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[Python's Egg]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Nutrition, Animal Development, Breeding


    Shows a man dining in a restaurant. He sees a snake emerging from an egg before him and he exclaims to a waiter: 'Here's a Python's Egg—no doubt about it!'. This is a reference to the large number of eggs recently produced by the python at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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.



Punch,  42 (1862), 97.

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Depots for Dypsomaniacs

Tobias Potts Potts, Tobias
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Narcotics, Hospitals, Crime, Medical Treatment, Mental Illness, Temperance, Gender


    Written in the style of a writer of limited literary ability, the author discusses a letter to The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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about 'a Ome for the Destitute at Edinbugg' (this is possibly St Vincent's Home for Destitute Children, Edinburgh St Vincent's Home for Destitute Children, Edinburgh
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), and the fact that the inmates 'is all Maniacs through their abits of inn temperance'. To support this, an extract from the letter in The Times is quoted in which the correspondent notes the medical consensus on the notion of ranking dypsomaniacs (the habitually intemperate) alongside 'the sick and insane', and the corresponding need for 'compulsory seculsion' of these often dangerous victims of drink. Notes the correspondent's call for 'a Norsepital or lunatic Asyliam' for these individuals and then presents his arguments for establishing an institution for the medical treatment, 'cheerful employment', 'reformation', and 'simple security', of the intemperate woman of the house. Concludes by offering his own and his bibulous friend Bill Snoggins's support for the move.



Punch,  42 (1862), 99.

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Punch to the Pitmen

Poonch Poonch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Human Species, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Periodicals


    Written in north-eastern dialect, discusses an Athenaeum Athenaeum (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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report of the moral and intellectual superiority of Northumbrian pitmen and these miners' resentment towards 'Poonch' for representing them as 'nae better than savages'. Goes on to note the Athenaeum's description of Northumbrian miners' 'fondness' for 'timid' pets, such as canaries, a characteristic that allegedly shows Punch to be liar.



Punch,  42 (1862), 100.

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The Right Place for the Right Man

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Vaccination, Heroism


    Suggests that, were the statue of Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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to be removed from Trafalgar Square, then Cowes would be an ideal place for siting the monument to the 'discoverer of vaccination'.



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Issue 1079 (15 March 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 101–02.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineers, Railways, Heroism | , GovernmentMilitary Technology, Government


    Reporting on William F Cowper's Cowper, William Francis, 1st Baron Mount-Temple (1811–88) ODNB
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blocking of an attempt to erect a statue of Joseph Locke Locke, Joseph (1805–60) ODNB
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, notes Long 1833–43 [Long, George], ed. 1833–43. Penny Cyclopaedia for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, 27 vols, London: Charles Knight
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, which praises the engineer as a leading figure in the development of railways, and thus considers it immaterial 'whether an official refuses or denies' a place for the statue. Later reports the observations of Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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concerning the remedies to defects in the Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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gun and George C Lewis's Lewis, Sir George Cornewall, 2nd Baronet (1806–63) ODNB
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facetious remarks on large and small bores. (102)



Punch,  42 (1862), 102.

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'Here's a Coil, My Masters'

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Development, Heat, Instruments, Zoological Gardens


    Reports on, and sympathises with, the complaint of the python at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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that she is not being allowed to hatch her eggs without the intrusion of Enrico A L Negretti Negretti, Enrico Angelo Ludovico (Henry) (1818–79) ODNB
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and Joseph W Zambra's Zambra, Joseph Warren (1822–97) WBI
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thermometers on her 'maternal coils'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [105].

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The Great French Medium

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Politics


    Shows Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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, 'The Medium', resting his hand on a table, around which sit 'Miss Italy', Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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, and other dignitaries. The medium reassures his guests that he can move 'that elderly party [the Pope] and her chair whenever and wherever I please!'. Miss Italy replies, 'Oh, I wish he would!'. This refers to Napoleon III's continued involvement in Italian politics.



Punch,  42 (1862), 109.

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Well Worth the Money

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Health, Engineering, Sanitation, Geology


    Reports that after boring into new red sandstone for a supply of water, the Rugby Board of Health Rugby Board of Health
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struck a salt spring, but points out that the 'geology says that they may perhaps get fresh water' if they were to dig down to the Permian strata, which is very much deeper. Seeks to reassure the board that the salt spring has 'strong medicinal properties' or can be used in a salt works, and thus more than compensate them for the expense of their boring operation.



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Issue 1080 (22 March 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 111–12.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Government, Politics


    Includes a report on the second reading of the 'Lunacy Bill' brought forward by Richard Bethell (1st Baron Westbury) Bethell, Richard, 1st Baron Westbury (1800–73) ODNB
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, which details Westbury's attack on Frederick Thesiger (1st Baron Chelmsford) Thesiger, Frederick, 1st Baron Chelmsford (1794–1878) ODNB
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and his friends 'for objecting to the provision for trying lunatics by Judges'. (112)



Punch,  42 (1862), 114.

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Whistling for a Wind. A Nautical Ballad

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Education


    Relates the story of 'the good ship Guv'ment' in 1862, which includes a portrait 'Capt'n Pam' [Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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], who criticized 'Gunner Lewis' [Palmerston's War Secretary George C Lewis Lewis, Sir George Cornewall, 2nd Baronet (1806–63) ODNB
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] for being 'at his guns when he should be, / A study in' of the Ancients and their Astronomie'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 117.

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The Voices of the Deep

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Sound, Amusement, Music, Discovery


    Discusses an extract from a report in Galignani's Messenger Galignani's Messenger (1821–95) Waterloo Directory
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on the research of Dr Dufosse Dufosse, Dr (fl. 1862) PU1/42/11/3
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, who claimed to have discovered the ability of fish to produce sounds from their 'pneumatic bladder[s]'. Suggests that fish should, on this basis, be able to talk and sing and to do so much better than the 'Talking Fish' attraction in London. Noting the report of 'the speeches of some fish' in 'that highly scientific book', the Arabian Nights, suggests that Dufosse will be able to interpret how fishes speak, a development that will make fishing more interesting. Goes on to speculate on the other intellectual powers of fish, including the possibility that they might be highly competent musicians and singers. Concludes by inviting those readers who doubt the speaking powers of any fish, to send it to the Punch offices where 'the matter shall be carefully discussed'. The illustration shows a fish singing, accompanied by another fish at a piano.



Punch,  42 (1862), 117.

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One of Shaftesbury's Characteristics

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Mental Illness, Religion


    Discusses a speech made in the House of Lords House of Lords
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by Anthony A Cooper (7th Earl of Shaftesbury) Cooper, Anthony Ashley, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (formerly styled 'Lord Ashley') (1801–85) ODNB
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on the Lunacy Bill, in which the peer illustrated the incompetence of even the 'greatest medical authorities' by referring to one medical practitioner who judged a woman to be insane on the basis of her conversion to Judaism. Urges Shaftesbury to remember that the medical practitioner was 'chaffing him' and doubtless recognised that 'perfectly sane persons had subscribed money to the conversion of the Jews'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 118.

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Something 'In Nubibus'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy


    Following news that the planet Saturn had lost its rings (a loss which Punch suggests may have been caused by such problems as 'financial pressure'), announces the return of the rings, which now shine brighter than ever. Deduces that the planet must have sent its rings to be cleaned or temporarily discarded them in a fight with a 'refractory star'. Urges George B Airy Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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to 'throw a light on this misty subject'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 118.

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A Respectful Query

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Crime


    Questions why the medium Charles H Foster Foster, Charles H (fl. 1900) WBI
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should escape prosecution for 'pocketing his hundreds' from spiritual séances, whereas gipsies are punished as rogues and vagabonds. Wonders if the spirits would 'work the treadmill' for Forster, and thinks he 'deserves to have the tables turned' on him.



Punch,  42 (1862), 119.

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Don't Confound the Parties

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Government, Mental Illness


    Distinguishes between the Commissioner on Lunacy, Samuel Warren Warren, Samuel (1807–77) ODNB
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, and the medium Charles H Forster Foster, Charles H (fl. 1900) WBI
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, emphasising that the former guards the property of the insane while the latter takes it. Adds that although the commissioner 'visits lunatics', the medium 'is visited by them'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 119.

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The Galvanic Crinoline!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Amusement, Electricity, Light


    Discusses a report in the Athenaeum Athenaeum (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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on the coronet of Empress Eugénie Eugénie, Empress of France (1826–1920) WBI
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of France, which is 'irradiated by electric light'. Noting that this invention requires a 'steel hoop' on which to carry the battery, suggests that this is how it is going 'to make a man's fortune', and describes a possible design for a battery built into a crinoline dress. Ends by identifying Isaac L Pulvermacher's Pulvermacher, Isaac Lewis (1815–84) WBI
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'Galvanic Chain' as another solution to the problem.



Punch,  42 (1862), 119.

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Working the Oracle

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Development, Breeding


Punch,  42 (1862), 120.

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A New Specimen of Parliamentary Natural History

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Race, Politics, Animal Behaviour, Human Development


    Following a suggestion that the Irish politician Myles W P O'Reilly O'Reilly, Myles William Patrick (1825–80) ODNB
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should 'change his name' to 'represent the class he properly belongs to', insists that he be called 'G' O'REILLY', and later, 'GORILLA'—another Punch identification of the Irish with apes.



^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1081 (29 March 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 121–22.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Education, Museums, Zoology, Engineering, Sanitation

Institutions mentioned:

Thames Embankment Thames Embankment
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    Reports on Henry C G G Lennox's Lennox, Lord Henry Charles George Gordon- (1821–86) ODNB, s.v. Lennox, Charles Gordon
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speech in the House of Commons House of Commons
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urging that 'One Minister of the Crown ought to be responsible to the House in regard to all estimates in reference to Education, Science, and Art'. Reports on the 'British Museum British Museum
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debate' and interprets William E Gladstone's Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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remarks to mean that 'the Dead Zoological Gardens are to be got rid of'. Goes on to mention the reception of William F Cowper's Cowper, William Francis, 1st Baron Mount-Temple (1811–88) ODNB
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'Bill for Embanking the Thames'. (122)



Punch,  42 (1862), 124, 127.

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Revival of the Canine-Fancy

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Politics, Government

Institutions mentioned:

House of Commons House of Commons
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    Describes a 'Great Match at the Swell Westminster Pit, between Lord D[erby]'s Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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dog, "Chelmsford" and the "Westbury Pup"', references to the parliamentary battle between Frederick Thesiger (1st Baron Chelmsford) Thesiger, Frederick, 1st Baron Chelmsford (1794–1878) ODNB
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and Richard Bethell (1st Baron Westbury) Bethell, Richard, 1st Baron Westbury (1800–73) ODNB
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over the latter's Lunacy Bill. The article describes the behaviour and physical characteristics of the dogs participating in the contest, portraits based on the political characteristics of the statesman after whom they are named. For example, Westbury is described as 'A bull-terrier of extraordinary game' who 'certainly recalls the best performances of the celebrated dog Brougham Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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, and is, if anything, a quicker dog on his legs, sharper in his bite, stronger in the jaw, and immeasurably nastier in temper'. (124)



Punch,  42 (1862), 128.

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A Card

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Commerce, Mental Illness


    The text of this spoof card describes the activities of the 'celebrated transparent medium, I. M. POSTER'—a reference to the medium Charles H Foster Foster, Charles H (fl. 1900) WBI
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. Recommends his 'practical application of the vivisection of bleeding hearts to bereaved parties', and notes that he makes 'Spirit Hands' from 'measurement, drawings, or casts', and that details of deceased relatives 'may be communicated' to the medium 'before or during the meeting'. Emphasises the medium's honesty and thus points out that 'Sceptics need not take the trouble to attend', although 'lunatics' are admitted free. Stresses that the medium has no connection with 'Mr. HOOM-BUG' (a reference to Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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) and that the only 'Medium' through which he can be 'communicated' is 'the current coin of the realm'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 128.

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The Best Abused Science of the Day

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Political Economy, Universities, Government, Politics, Commerce, Charlatanry, Boundary Formation


    Observing how little political economy is practised and understood by governments, wonders where it exists, 'excepting in our Universities'. In light of the nation's 'increasing expenditure [...] this scientific impostor should in honesty throw off its libellous cognomen' and be called 'the Science of Political Extravagance'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 129.

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The Organ Grinding Nuisance

Mary Mary
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof; Editorial

Subjects:

Music, Pollution, Scientific Practitioners, Astronomy, Gender


    Written from the perspective of a female domestic servant of limited literary ability, who describes how her master, George B Airy Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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, became so outraged at the noise created by an 'Italyan orgin man' that he promised to take him to the police. She thinks that the only reason Airy did this was because he is 'a Stronomer or Somthink of that sort and bizzey with Rithmetic and Mathew Matticks' and 'Mustent be disturbed'. Adds that she wants Punch to tell her what right Airy has to stop her and her friend enjoying their 'Musick'. In an editorial, Punch urges her to enjoy the music 'unattended by anybody else's annoyance', and points out to her that Airy's 'professional calculations' earn him an income which pays her wages.



Punch,  42 (1862), 130.

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A Spirit Rapping Seance!

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Caricature

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Mental Illness


    Shows a spiritualistic seance at a drawing room table around which sit several people who possess the heads of various animals associated with credulity: geese and asses. At the top of the table sits the medium, Mr Foxer, who has the head of a fox (an animal associated with cunning), and who tells his guests, 'There's a spirit named Walker writing on my arm!'. Mr Foxer represents Charles H Foster Foster, Charles H (fl. 1900) WBI
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, who claimed that spirits of the dead communicated by writing messages on his arm.



^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1082 (5 April 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 131.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Amusement, Government, Politics, Mental Illness, Crime, Medical Practitioners


    Notes Mr Punch's belief that the 'legislature of the country is in a state of mild collapse', a symptom of, among other things, 'the incubation of the Pythoness'. Goes on to report that Richard Bethell (1st Baron Westbury) Bethell, Richard, 1st Baron Westbury (1800–73) ODNB
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successfully passed his Lunacy Bill through its committee stage, 'defeating his beloved friend Lord Chelmsford Thesiger, Frederick, 1st Baron Chelmsford (1794–1878) ODNB
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, in an attempt to knock out the two years and no doctor clause'. He also rejected the proposal of Anthony A Cooper (7th Earl of Shaftesbury) Cooper, Anthony Ashley, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (formerly styled 'Lord Ashley') (1801–85) ODNB
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to deny the '"opinion" of a medical man' as 'proof of insanity'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 134.

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Merry and Dreary England

Smelfungus Smelfungus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Environmentalism, Ecology, Pollution, Manufactories, Industry, Animal Behaviour, Human Development, Descent, Evolution, Race, Extinction


    Responding to a newspaper report on the proposed enclosure of waste lands, laments the possibility that this will destroy most of England's heather, gorse, forest, swamp, and snipe-bog, and cause the 'face of the earth' to be covered with 'smoky factories and still worse nuisances', and agricultural produce. Criticises the fact that this will also destroy the sources of 'spiritual refreshment' and poetry. Condemns those who worship chimneys and their stomachs as 'incipient brutes' who will 'ultimately descend nearly to a level with the beasts [...] of the stye', and thus develop a 'countenance resembling the Chinese'. Concludes by attacking the proposal for a 'more numerous population' on the grounds that it 'makes the atmosphere sultry', a condition to which polluted air and rivers contribute.



Punch,  42 (1862), 134.

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The End of Naval War (To the Peace Society Peace Society
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)

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Steamships, Electricity


    Upholds the superiority of ironclad ships over wooden ones, emphasising the fact that they can carry 'more and heavier guns' and a larger 'invading force', and that they can sustain longer bombardments from such weapons as Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns. Noting the difficulty of penetrating ironclad ships, wonders how such ships are going to fight, suggesting that they might do so with the highly explosive 'fulminating silver' or 'Some new discovery in electricity'. However, Punch also suggests that opposing ironclads might 'part in peace'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 134.

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Silent Spirit-Rapping

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Music


Punch,  42 (1862), 139.

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Tall Doin's

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

War, Nationalism, Telegraphy


Punch,  42 (1862), 140.

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A Matter of Absorbing Interest

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Instruments, Chemistry, Narcotics, Periodicals


    Describes Mr Punch's response to his discovery, in 'scientific magazines', of articles on the 'Absorbmeter' that determines the 'volumes of liquid absorbed during successive intervals of time'. Goes on to describe how Mr Punch, who 'naturally takes the cause of science much at heart, and taking a deep interest in all scientific instruments', sought to test the invention. Reports that at a 'little dinner down at Greenwich', Mr Punch found that 'the absorbents' (his bibulous friends) absorb different alcoholic beverages at different rates. Mr Punch urges his 'scientific friends' to invent a 'clever apparatus' that will enable 'absorbents' to determine their capacity, and thus prevent them from drinking too much and suffering the resulting 'bad headaches'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 140.

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Railway Raillery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Exhibitions, Commerce


    Notes how other periodicals have condemned railway companies north of the Thames for 'resolving not to run excursion-trains in May' during the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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, accusing them of being tyrants over 'the British people'. Ironically represents such attacks preposterous, suggesting that the decision must be a premature April fools' joke. Argues that railway companies will 'so largely benefit by the Exhibition' that they 'will do their utmost to make it a success' and not lose out on this source of profit.



Punch,  42 (1862), 140.

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Close Close, John (1816–91) ODNB
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, the Poet, Antianthopophagus

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Human Development


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1083 (12 April 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 143.

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Lines on the Lunacy Bill

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Human Species, War


    Opens by noting that 'Learned writers' on mental disease claim that 'all mankind are mad', and insists that while 'most men are ruled by reason', the fact that so many men are persuaded to fight and die for their country and then be forgotten, suggests that 'But for madness, scarce a martyr / To his country would be found', and thus how fortunate it is that 'others are insane'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 143–44.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, War, Politics, Invention, Experiment, Government, Progress, Comparative Philology, Zoology, Zoological Gardens, Representation

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Reports on a debate on the subject of 'invulnerable' ships which was prompted by the recent defeat of the Confederate iron ship Merrimac Merrimac, ship
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by a Union ironclad, the Monitor Monitor, ship
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. Strongly defending this incident as conclusive proof of the awesome strength of ironclads, Punch praises John Bright Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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who upheld the importance of the incident and criticised George C Lewis Lewis, Sir George Cornewall, 2nd Baronet (1806–63) ODNB
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for arguing that the government should not 'rush into costly experiments' regarding iron ships. Lamenting Lewis's recalcitrance, reminds him that 'neither the Pyrrhic phalanx nor Greek fire was invented by parties who declined to advance within the military spirit of the time'. (143) Later notes the 'more satisfactory' speech of Edward A Seymour (12th Duke of Somerset) St Maur [formerly Seymour], Edward Adolphus, 12th Duke of Somerset (1804–85) ODNB
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, who reported the preparation of four British ironclads and the government's awareness of the importance of the subject. Reports that Edwin H Landseer Landseer, Sir Edwin Henry (1802–73) ODNB
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still visits the lions in the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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. Discusses the support of Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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for several measures to improve the nation's defences, including Cowper P Coles's Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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armoured 'Cupola', or turret for ships.



Punch,  42 (1862), 144.

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Crinoline Ashore and Afloat

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, War, Gender

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Comparing the armour-plating of steamships with the 'ribs of steel' used in women's crinoline dresses, notes that while 'steel ribs' will save HER MAJESTY's marine from capture, wonders who would try to capture 'A wife in crinoline'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 145.

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Mr Bright and the Fine Arts

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Representation, Military Technology, War, Invention, Publishing, Telegraphy, Steam-power, Nationalism

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Describes some of the paintings that the 'zealous patron of the Arts', John Bright Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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, has desired to see displayed at the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. These represent Bright's general support for America and include representations of British ships being defeated in the American War of Independence (a possible reference to the contemporary debate over the state of Britain's naval fleet) and of 'some of the most useful things the world has ever seen'—the 'American' invented printing-press, electric telegraph, and steam-engine.



Punch,  42 (1862), 146.

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Iron-Clad Jack. A Sea-Song of the Future

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, War


    Opens by praising the strength of 'Iron-clad Jack', the 'good iron-ship' that can sustain attacks sufficient to sink wooden frigates. Describes how he sought to reassure his Poll that there was no need to fear his voyage as he would be 'snug as can be' on the ironclad which is well armed and 'Shot-and-shell proof from sternpost to stem'. Goes on to note that a blacksmith explained how the 'sheathing was such' that no shots could reach its timber, and that however much an enemy 'pound away', 'we'll never say die'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 146.

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Opening of the International Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Scientific Practitioners, Engineers


    Notes from the London Gazette London Gazette (1665–1900+) BUCOP
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that the five commissioners chosen to open the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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as a 'Temple of Industry, Science, and Art' will include William Fairbairn Fairbairn, Sir William (1789–1874) ODNB
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, Michael Faraday Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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, and Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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.



Punch,  42 (1862), [147].

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The 'British Tar' of the Future

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Steamships


    Responding to the government's recent decision to replace the Royal Navy's Royal Navy
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wooden ships with ironclads, this illustration shows an inner deck of a wooden frigate in which all the sailors are wearing suits of armour.



Punch,  42 (1862), 149.

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A Nicer Sort of Bread

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Agriculture, Machinery, Class, Political Economy, Industry, Work


    Discusses Harriet Martineau's Martineau, Harriet (1802–76) ODNB
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argument that 'STEVENS'S Bread-Making Machinery' will economise the labour of manufacturing bread and end 'journeymen bakers' grievances'. Thinks that the notion of eating bread made from something that has killed 'the journeyman baker' is like 'eating the journeyman himself', but that bread will now be eaten 'without a shudder' owing to the fact that kneading will no longer be performed by muscular power.



Punch,  42 (1862), 149.

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A Sea Change

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Language


    Considers the effect of the new ironclads on 'nautical phraseology'. For example, expects 'Shiver my timbers' will be replaced by 'Unrivet my plates'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 149.

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'The Voices of the Deep'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Sound

People mentioned:

Dr Dufosse Dufosse, Dr (fl. 1862) PU1/42/11/3
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Punch,  42 (1862), 149.

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Talk About the Telegraph

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Engineering, Communication, Internationalism


    Discusses an article in the Standard Standard (1827–60) Evening Standard (1860–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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reporting on a conversazione at which the possibility of a trans-Atlantic telegraph was considered, and an article in the Observer Observer (1791–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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which describes how news is received in England from America by mail (between America and Ireland) and telegraph (between Ireland and England). Noting that 'we can't bridge the Atlantic with a telegraph wire', presents another extract explaining how Mr Silver Silver, Mr (fl. 1862) PU1/42/14/11
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and his firm propose a new network of overland and submarine telegraphs (which exploit a new 'ebonite insulator' on the telegraph post) to expedite telegraphic signals from Ireland. Anticipates that 'If they continue to improve our means of wiredrawn intercourse' then 'discourse with distant countries' will not be far off.



Punch,  42 (1862), 149.

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Spiritual Weakness

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Proof, Charlatanry


Punch,  42 (1862), 150.

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A Coil of Brooding Mystery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

R D Doyle, Richard (1824–83) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Development, Breeding, Animal Behaviour, Zoological Gardens, Botanical Gardens


    Noting the interest in the 'daily incubation of the Python' at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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, wishes to know what will become of the large number of eggs once they have hatched. Suggests that, while pythons may please those who have 'a fine ear for such instruments', the residents of Regent's Park will not be able to sleep through fear of waking up with pythons around them. Urges that these 'pretty pets' be kept safe and thus prevented from harming children and nursery-maids in Regent's Park. Expresses concern about the dangers of further python breeding and the 'dangerous invasion' of England by snakes. However, expects that the Zoological Gardens will give pythons to the Jardin des Plantes, Paris Jardin des Plantes, Paris
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, and 'similar congenial institutions', and considers the possibility of them being sold as meat to costermongers. (150) Concludes by urging the directors of the Zoological Gardens not to send a python to Punch. The illustration, which forms the first word of the text, shows a young woman encircled by a snake.



Punch,  42 (1862), 151.

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The Sick Man in the Money Market

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Alchemy, Medical Treatment


Punch,  42 (1862), 152.

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Britannia's Shield

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Comparative Philology, Nationalism


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1084 (19 April 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 153.

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Frozen-Out Mediums

L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture


    Shows a line of dejected male and female mediums clutching some of the supposed tools of their trade, including an accordion and a 'spirit-hand' on the end of a stick.



Punch,  42 (1862), 153.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics, Zoology, Menageries, Military Technology, War, Government, Politics, Sound, Technology, Accidents, Metallurgy


    Criticises some conclusions reached by 'one of those calculating idiots' about William E Gladstone's Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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budget speech, and expects these calculators to make such calculations as the total length of the pythons (laid end to end) to be born to their mother in the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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. Later reports on the excitement caused in the Houses of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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by the conclusion drawn by William G Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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that shells fired from his gun can penetrate ironclad ships, and news that Cowper P Coles Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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(the inventor of an armoured turret for ships) is being treated 'properly' by the Admiralty Admiralty
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, 'a miracle, considering that COLES is an inventor of an invaluable affair'. Notes discussion of the state of Big Ben Big Ben
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, which, according to the metallurgist John Percy Percy, John (1817–89) ODNB
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, could be used, but would probably crack again.



Punch,  42 (1862), 156.

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How Vulcan Gave Iron Armour to Taurus-Neptunus (from Punch's Homer)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Military Technology, Government, Politics, War, Nationalism


    Another response to the government drive to arm the Royal Navy Royal Navy
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with ironclads. Describes how Vulcan forged for Taurus (John Bull in disguise) 'a plate / Whose strength might scorn the thunder-bolt of fate' and armour 'worthy of the ocean-king'. Notes how Taurus departed believing that 'war was foolish and expensive' but thought that he was right to defend 'His loved BRITANNIA'. Describes how Taurus was then clad in 'Iron Arms' by the 'Nereids of the deep', after which he defies anybody to approach him.



Punch,  42 (1862), [157].

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Vulcan Arming Neptune

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Military Technology, Government

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Similar to Anon, 'How Vulcan Gave Iron Armour to Taurus-Neptunus (from Punch's Homer)', Punch, 42 (1862), 156, this shows Neptune (who, from a tattoo on his arm, represents John Bull) being clad in a suit of armour by Vulcan (who forges his armour plating) and by female cherubim (the Nereids who crown Neptune with a steel helmet).



Punch,  42 (1862), 159.

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Our Dramatic Correspondent

One Who Pays One Who Pays
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Imposture, Amusement


    Thanks Thomas G Reed Reed, Thomas German (1817–88) ODNB
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for his burlesque of spirit-rapping 'in his bright new entertainment'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 159.

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Curiosities of Natural History

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Representation, Animal Behaviour, Zoology, Natural History, Zoological Gardens


    Following news that Edwin H Landseer Landseer, Sir Edwin Henry (1802–73) ODNB
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is 'studying the habits' of the lion, suggests that the best place to do so is not (as Landseer believes) the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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but, playing on the use of the word lion for celebrated personality, 'some fashionable haunt, like the Horticultural Gardens Royal Horticultural Society—Gardens, Chiswick
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'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 160.

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Maxim for Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Display, Progress, Industry, Morality, Commerce, Work


    Questions the meaning of an inscription on a stained glass window at the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. Agrees with the inscription that the goal of everybody's labour should be the progress of the human race, but is not clear about the type of progress posited. Points out that 'moral and spiritual progress' comes from 'master-minds' not labouring men, and insists that the 'final object of labour of almost every individual' is 'his own aggrandisement', and that the exhibition has been built on acquisitiveness.



Punch,  42 (1862), 160.

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Pull Armstrong, Pull Admiralty

Anon

Genre:

Diary, Spoof

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Invention, Engineers, Steamships, Patronage, Government, Politics, Technology, Futurism


    A semi-fictional account of William G Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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, his weapons, and his relationship with the Admiralty Admiralty
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. The chronicle describes the competition between Armstrong and the Admiralty for military strength, every invention of Armstrong being defeated by another produced by his rival, and William E Gladstone's Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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almost yearly increases in income tax (undoubtedly to pay for these expensive military projects). For example, after the Admiralty makes (in 1863) 'Platina Ships fastened with diamond cement', Armstrong invents (in 1864) 'Brazen Thunderbolts' which sink most of the British fleet, but then the Admiralty replies with 'Torpedo vessels' that are below the range of any guns. The competition is interrupted briefly in 1867 by John Cumming's Cumming, John (1807–81) ODNB
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proclamation of the Millennium, but then continues into the 1870s with Armstrong inventing such weapons as an 'Alp-Shell' for sinking stone ships and a 'Balloon battering-train', and the Admiralty replying with 'an Aerial Fleet' and a 'Subterranean Fleet'. The chronicle ends with Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France successfully proclaiming the Millennium and Armstrong (now knighted 'Lord BOMB') inventing 'Volcano Fireworks' and accidently 'burn[ing] up the Public' (and thus his patrons).



Punch,  42 (1862), 161.

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The Peculiarities of a Smoky Chimney

Anon

Genre:

Dialogue, Drollery

Subjects:

Heat, Pollution


Punch,  42 (1862), 161.

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Neat and Appropriate

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships

People mentioned:

Cowper P Coles Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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Punch,  42 (1862), 161.

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The Days When We Wore Straps

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Progress, Technology, Railways, Telegraphy, Photography, Spiritualism


    Recalls the 'days when we wore straps', when 'Most of all our rising men / Puling in their nurses' laps', 'Railways were a wonder new' and 'Telegraphic wires were not', and instead there were slow stage-coaches and news deliveries. Adds that this was a time when india-rubber was expensive and gutta-percha unknown, and 'Science had not yet to bear / Brought the Sun's pictorial rays'. Neither were 'Spirits, under tables heard', which then would have 'been thought too absurd'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 162.

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Zodiacal Sign for the British Fleet

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    'The Ram'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 162.

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Pity the Sorrows of the Poor Pythoness

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Development, Breeding, Animal Behaviour, Feeling, Heat, Instruments, Scientific Practitioners, Experiment


    Written from the perspective of the female python at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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, who condemns the 'British public' for causing her eggs to rot and for keeping only one of the eggs which has produced an abnormally small snake. Inveighs against Philip L Sclater Sclater, Philip Lutley (1829–1913) DSB
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for confining her in a coil, and emphasises the python's 'sensibilities' and 'horror of intrusion' by scientific practitioners. She goes on to observe that all a 'snake-mother' wants are the warm conditions under which her eggs can develop; instead she was prodded and poked, and had her peace and comfort rudely disturbed by a fellow trying to measure her temperature with his 'ZAMBRA and NEGRETTI' (the thermometer-making firm of Joseph W Zambra Zambra, Joseph Warren (1822–97) WBI
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and Enrico A L Negretti Negretti, Enrico Angelo Ludovico (Henry) (1818–79) ODNB
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) or by Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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. Concludes that 'those soi-distant men of science, / On time and kindly nature are too clever for reliance' and in their 'anxiety' have plucked her eggs too soon. She goes on to ask the scientists to consider her feelings—notably, the thrill that spread through her like 'the electric fire' when she felt 'the stirrings blend'—but notes that scientific men are unlikely to credit her with feelings.



Punch,  42 (1862), 162.

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Difference Betwixt (Sea) Chips of an Old (Land) Block by Land and Sea

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    'COLES'S Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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Ironsides in 1862 and CROMWELL'S Cromwell, Oliver (1599–1658) ODNB
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Ironsides in 1642'.



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Issue 1085 (26 April 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 163.

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A Trifling Chronological Error

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Biblical Authority, Religion


    Shows two naval veterans on a beach staring out to sea. On the horizon, one of them observes an 'Iron-Clad' which he mistakes for Noah's Ark.



Punch,  42 (1862), 163.

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A Peace Preserver

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Politics


    Describes a spoof proposal, putatively made by the Peace Society Peace Society
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, to build an iron vessel with 'several cupolas constructed by CAPTAIN COLES Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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', which it will christen the 'John Bright Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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Floating Battery'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 164.

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Rogues of the World. (A Bellow)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Commerce, Military Technology, Steamships, Engineering, Nationalism, Internationalism


    Written from the perspective of the British nation, complains of the cost of reconstructing the Royal Navy's Royal Navy
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ships to operate by steam, and of then reconstructing them again with 'iron wood'. Observes that the expense thwarts Britain's desire to 'rebuild London'. Questions why foreign nations execrate Britain's name, when it meditates 'no base invasion'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 169.

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To Charlotte with Her Photograph

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Photography, Representation, Light


    Upholds the sublime and superior beauty of the photograph of Charlotte, and, noting the transience of her image in a mirror to that produced in a photograph, ends by observing that the photograph 'Will truly show you what you were; / How elegant, how fresh and fair'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 170.

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A Farewell to the Old Fleet

An Old Salt Old Salt, An
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Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, War, Technology, Progress, Government, Cultural Geography


    Implicitly responding to the government's recent proposals to replace the wooden ships of the Royal Navy Royal Navy
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with ironclad vessels, he bids his farewell to his 'trim three-decker' on the grounds that 'Iron's proved of wood a wrecker'. Compares what sailors were in the days of Horatio Nelson Nelson, Horatio, Viscount Nelson (1758–1805) ODNB
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to the present, when they are 'half soldiers and half stokers', and laments the passing of the days of 'Good seamanship' and knowledge of sails. Describes the latest ships as 'floating forts with iron cased' and equipped with Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns. Following 'them Yankee swabs' who fought under water, anticipates that the Navy will soon become 'a fleet of diving bells'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 172.

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Timber Superseded

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Nationalism


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Issue 1086 (3 May 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 175.

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A Mart for Art

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Commerce, Technology, Military Technology, Railways


    Reports that opposite the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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, which opened on 1 May 1862, 'certain enterprising persons' have established an 'International Bazaar'. The narrator intends to purchase there such items as an Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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gun, a railway locomotive, and 'a Shoeburyness target'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 175.

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The Iron Age Afloat

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships


    Considers some of the effects on sailors' lives resulting from the introduction of ironclad vessels into the Royal Navy Royal Navy
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. Believes that the appearance of these mastless vessels will end seamanship and substitute stoking the fire hole for sailors' concern with sails. Adds that new forms of punishment will be introduced including dangling seamen in the funnel.



Punch,  42 (1862), 176.

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How to Christen our Ironsides

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Natural History, Zoology, Language, War


    Argues that the reconstruction of the Royal Navy Royal Navy
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with ironclads will require changes to the names of vessels. Given that ships will now resemble 'a pachydermatous or a crustaceous animal', suggests that ships of the line might be called 'Rhinoceros', 'Elephant', or 'Whale', a 'steam-ram' might be called 'Narwhal', and that smaller vessels might be christened 'Porpoise' and 'Crab'. Concludes by suggesting that ironclads might also be named after emblems of peace, such as 'Dove'.



Punch,  42 (1862), [177].

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Peace

Anon

Genre:

Illustration

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Military Technology, War, Internationalism


    Shows a mournful-looking winged female figure who, carrying an olive branch in one hand, sits on a large Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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gun. The caption reveals that this is Mr Punch's 'design for a colossal statute, which ought to have been placed in the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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'.


See also:

Anon, 'The Opening of the Great Exhibition', Punch, 42 (1862), 179


Punch,  42 (1862), 179.

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The Opening of the Great Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Technology, Military Technology, Internationalism, War


    Describes the opening of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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, with special reference to the crowds outside the building, the 'Clearing of the Nave' of the building, the 'Procession' of dignitaries, and exhibition commissioners, jurors, and other protagonists including the exhibition's architects Francis Fowke Fowke, Francis (1823–65) ODNB
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and Henry Cole Cole, Sir Henry (1808–82) ODNB
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. The final stanza describes the 'Unexpected Appearance' at the exhibition—namely, the allegorical figure of Peace, sitting on an Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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gun. She looks sad and laments the fact that the gun should be her 'vehicle'. She also laments that in the decade since the opening of the Great Exhibition Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations (1851)
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her cause has been shattered in Europe, since 'huge steam-hammers rise and fall, / To forge the great ship's armour-wall' and other armaments threaten her. She ends by resolving to stay at home.


See also:

Anon, 'Peace', Punch, 42 (1862), [177]


Punch,  42 (1862), 181.

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Additional Regulations. For the Conduct of the Public During the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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Anon

Genre:

Instructions, Spoof

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Display, Education, Machinery, Progress


    Includes warnings that the public is not to 'go staring at things merely because they are pretty, or celebrated', but to 'go regularly and reverentially through the whole building, and is specially to make itself master of every part of the Machinery Exhibition before venturing to examine the products of the machinery'. The rules also stipulate that anybody who 'makes a remark upon the difference between the building of 1851 [the Crystal Palace Crystal Palace
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] and the present one, and does not distinctly declare the latter to be immeasurably the superior', will be removed by the police, who will also enforce the idea that the exhibition is 'a grand success'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 181.

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Something in Initials, if not in a Name

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships

People mentioned:

Cowper P Coles Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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Punch,  42 (1862), 182.

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The Toxicology of Shakespeare

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Pharmaceuticals, Narcotics, Quackery, Charlatanry


    Discusses an advertisement in a 'Morning Paper', issued by the British College of Health British College of Health
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on behalf of the Society of Hygeists Society of Hygeists
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, which quotes what it claims was William Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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anticipation of the 'Hygeian system of JAMES MORISON Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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'. Draws attention to the advertisement's surprising claim that the poison used by the ghost of Hamlet's father (hebenon or henbane) was used in Morison's 'Universal Vegetable Pills'. Points out that if the advertisers mean to identify Morison's pills with poison then they are to be praised for 'great candour' and for giving the public grounds to exercise caution before using this treatment.



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Issue 1087 (10 May 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 184.

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Not Half a World's Fair

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Amusement, Animal Behaviour, Menageries


    Questions the propriety of calling the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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a 'World Fair' on the grounds that it has no 'wild beasts in it', 'menagerie', or other amusements found in circuses.



Punch,  42 (1862), 184.

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Exhibition of Protective Inventions

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Military Technology, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Crime, Technology


    Endorses the display of weapons at the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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because they 'remind us how very much lower we are than angels' and how close we are to 'some foreigners who are very little above fiends'. Questions why the exhibition only displays machines for inflicting harm on enemies, and not on 'ourselves under necessity of self-defence'—for example, 'the crank', 'treadmill', and the gallows.



Punch,  42 (1862), 185.

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Inconceivable Fatuity

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Education, Psychology


    Discusses the case of a man who took legal action against a chemist for prescribing inappropriate medicine, but who adopted the surprising course of going to the chemist on the advice of a beadle, a course of action which it is suggested shows 'hopeless feebleness of mind'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 185.

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The Bare Idea!

Anon

Genre:

Dialogue, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoological Gardens, Animal Behaviour

Institutions mentioned:

Zoological Society—Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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Punch,  42 (1862), [187].

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The May-Day Present

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Display, Aesthetics, Nationalism


    Shows Mr Bull handing Mrs Britannia a model of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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, a gesture which she greets by saying, 'I can't think it quite so pretty as the one you gave me eleven years ago' (i.e. the Crystal Palace Crystal Palace
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). Mr Bull replies, 'p'raps not, dear madam—but you should see inside!'



Punch,  42 (1862), 189.

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The Two Queens in the Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Industry, Machinery, Skill, Agriculture, Work


    Describes a meeting between 'Strong Queen Handicraft' and 'Fair Queen Art' at midnight in the silence of the 'monster Building' of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. They discuss each other's contributions to the products on display. Art insists that Handicraft owns the 'profusion / Of the fruits of toil, / Loom and forge-work, clay and crystal', the 'Growth of seed and soil' and the 'spinning of men-spiders, / Honey of men's hives'. Handicraft, clad in a 'Coal-black' robe, a crown of fire, and wielding a hammer as a sceptre, informs Art that it is she who gives beauty to her roughly shaped masses. Art adds that in 'this age of iron' she is 'Chain'd to thy "behest"'. The queens each continue to give reasons why the other should sit on the 'throne', with Art finally deciding to reign apart in her own gallery.



Punch,  42 (1862), 190.

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Birds and Beasts

Cock Robin Robin, Cock
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Agriculture, Ornithology, Natural History, Hunting, Cruelty, Race

Institutions mentioned:

International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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    Written to represent the style of a yokel, who describes a local concert given by songbirds and relishes news that the Acclimatisation Society Acclimatisation Society, New South Wales
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has successfully imported such species into New Zealand. Goes on to explain his use of magpies as deterrents against grubs, and he condemns news (seen in the Stamford Mercury Stamford Mercury (1713–83) Lincoln, Rutland and Stamford Mercury (1784–1900+) British Library Newspaper Catalogue
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) of 'young labourers and itinerants' who made their living from killing the small birds that destroy insects. Claims that 'Tis all along o-bein unbelievin Jews; there is no baitun into their heads that small birds baint varmant'. Wishes Punch would get one of its 'young men' to 'gie my nabers a lectur or two on natural histry' to stop this 'dickycide'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 191.

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Frozen Out Sailors

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Steam-power, Status


    The initial letter of the text is formed from a droll representation of the Royal Navy's Royal Navy
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new ironclad vessels: a domestic iron floating on water with a gun poking out of its stern. The text ponders the fate of sailors 'Now that floating iron shot-towers are to constitute our fleet'. Considers employing sailors on board 'flat-irons' a 'waste of wages' and an 'insult', not least because they resent steam-powered ships. Notes that while the Navy combined steam-engines with masts and sails, the new fleet will now be 'floating forts'. Imagines the disgust felt by a sailor of the 'old school' on being asked to serve in an ironclad and expects that some of the unemployed sailors will become 'bus-conductors'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 191.

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A Big Name for a Big Place

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Language


    Suggests some more easily pronounced alternatives to the name 'International Exhibition' International Exhibition (1862), London
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. Observes that the 'South Kensington Museum South Kensington Museum
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has been called the Brompton Bilers; and if we don't take care, the new building may possibly get christened "FOWKE'S Fowke, Francis (1823–65) ODNB
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Folly"'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 192.

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Speculations About Money, and Without Any Money

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Commerce, Government, Medical Treatment


    Includes the speculation that a 'Shin-Plaster' is a 'specific invented in the first instance by a weak government that was on its last legs, and was obliged to resort to this quack remedy' to maintain 'anything like a footing in the money-market'.



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Issue 1088 (17 May 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 193–94.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Language, Military Technology, Telegraphy, Pollution, Government, Politics


    Discussing remarks made in the Houses of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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on the complexities of the Welsh language, observes the probable existence of 'a pack of sentimentalists' who 'offer prizes for Welsh odes and such like Gorilla utterances' (193). Reports also on the remarks of Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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concerning spithead forts, the progress of the Red Sea Telegraph Bill, and the support of Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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for measures to be taken to 'avert the Evil Smells caused by certain manufactures'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 194.

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To All Whom it May Concern

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Language


    Lists some puns on the names of the principal organizers of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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, Henry Cole Cole, Sir Henry (1808–82) ODNB
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and Francis Fowke Fowke, Francis (1823–65) ODNB
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.



Punch,  42 (1862), 195.

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A Flying Island Wanted

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Experiment, Commerce, Progress, War, Invention, Technology, Aeronautics


    Reflecting on the expensive battle between gun makers and shipbuilders for the strongest military invention, calls for the creation of 'an Island of Laptua' to save on costly 'Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns and Shoeburyness experiments'. Anticipates that the battle will result in the construction of a conical shot as large as the 'Big Pyramid' in Egypt. Believes the invention of a 'Flying Island' would end the battle for technological supremacy because instead of fighting with an army and a navy, the inhabitants of the island would simply need to drop material on their enemies. Goes on to suggest the need for 'an invention to annihilate an army at a [single] blow', which would be an unprecedented peace maker, while the knowledge that Britain had a 'Flying Island' would help prevent her being attacked.


See also:

Anon, 'Pull Armstrong, Pull Admiralty', Punch, 42 (1862), 160


Punch,  42 (1862), 195.

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The Best Way of Preserving Meat

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Disease


    'Invite none but Vegetarians to dine with you'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 199.

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The Craniology of Race

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Anatomy, Race, Ethnology


    Discusses a meeting at the Ethnological Society Ethnological Society of London
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at which, following a paper by Charles C Blake Blake, Charles Carter (fl. 1864–81) WBI
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on the 'character of the Peruvian skulls' (a version of which was published as Blake 1863 Blake, Charles Carter 1863. 'On the Cranial Characters of the Peruvian Races of Men', Transactions of the Ethnological Society of London, 2, 216–32
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), John Crawfurd Crawfurd, John (1783–1868) ODNB
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denied that skulls could be used to determine racial differences, supporting his case with the example of a famous anatomist who 'pronounced the skull of a Scotchman to be that of a negro' (a reference to Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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; see , Anon, 'Sawney and Sambo', Punch, 34 (1858), 242).



Punch,  42 (1862), 200.

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Wants of the World's Fair

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Display, Reading


    Notes how the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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has gained fame for its 'Want of order and arrangement' and notoriety for the 'bulk and weight of the catalogue which the visitor is [...] obliged to lug around'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 201.

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Punchii, Cracem Pacem Petentis Palinodia

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Architecture, Engineering

People mentioned:

Francis Fowke Fowke, Francis (1823–65) ODNB
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Punch,  42 (1862), 202.

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The Elegant Omnibus

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery; Illustration

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [2]

Subjects:

Transport, Progress, Gender


    Rejoices in the establishment in London of the new 'Manchester and Glasgow' kind of omnibuses—vehicles noted for being 'kind, spacious, clean, comfortable', and drawn by three instead of two horses. Notes Mr Punch's recommendation of the new vehicles to crinoline-clad women, and his hopes that 'great numbers of the new omnibuses will be launched', thus driving to distraction the 'atrocious things which at present infest London' (i.e. the city's existing omnibuses). The illustrations give two different views of the inside of the luxurious new omnibuses.



Punch,  42 (1862), 202.

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The World in Little at South Kensington

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Astronomy, Instruments


    Likens the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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to 'a view of the Universe through the small end of the telescope', notably what the world would look like if it were improved by 'clearing out the Nave' and the 'rubbish' of 'Foreign Courts'.



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Issue 1089 (24 May 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 204–05.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Analytical Chemistry, Military Technology, Invention, Government, Politics


    Reports on the appointment of the 'Smell Committee' of Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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—a reference to the House of Lords House of Lords
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Select Committee on Injury from Noxious Vapours Select Committee on Injury from Noxious Vapours
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, which is intended to investigate claims that people and lands are being poisoned 'by the eructations from certain manufactories'. Notes that the evil is to be remedied rather than prevented and supposes that Michael Faraday Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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may 'illuminate the Lords on the subject'. Also reports the observation of the admiral, Clarence E Paget Paget, Lord Clarence Edward (1811–95) ODNB
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, that Cowper P Coles Coles, Cowper Phipps (1819–70) ODNB
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criticised the Admiralty Admiralty
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for not treating his inventions fairly—which Punch wryly notes is astonishing given that august body's 'sweet readiness' to assist inventors. (204)



Punch,  42 (1862), 205.

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Progress and Devastation (Dedicated to LORD DERBY)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Environmentalism, Government, Manufactories, Industrial Chemistry, Evolution


    A response to the establishment under Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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of a House of Lords House of Lords
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Select Committee on Injury from Noxious Vapours Select Committee on Injury from Noxious Vapours
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. Complains of the 'foul smoke' with which 'factory chimneys' taint 'Nature's fair face'. Proceeds to lament the pollution of streams and 'pleasant' rivers by 'the refuse of "Works"', the poisoning of fish and the fleeing of the spirit of 'old Isaac Walton Walton, Izaak (1593–1683) DSB
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', and the diffusion of the 'breath of chemical corrosion' from 'vast chemical workshops'. Concludes by insisting that 'If the struggle for life, our engrossing employ' is destroyed by 'All that makes life worth living', science should save some 'verdure and flowers' for the short remaining time.



Punch,  42 (1862), 206.

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St Januarius for Italy!

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Miracle, Supernaturalism, Heat, Instruments, Natural Law, Imposture


    Addressed to the editor of the Catholic Tablet Tablet (1840–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, discusses a report in the Siècle Siècle, Le (1836–1900+) COPAC
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of the alleged liquefaction of the blood of St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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after King Victor Emanuel II Victor Emanuel II, King of Italy (1820–78) CBD
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of Italy had presented an expensive diamond cross to the saint. Puzzled by the incident, given Pope Pius IX's Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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excommunication of the monarch, but asks rhetorically if the blood 'always liquefies under conditions which are indicated by a certain figure to which they would raise the column of mercury in a thermometer', conditions which might be achieved by accepting 'a given quantity of carbon, in the extremely pure form of a diamond cross equivalent to a mass of silver tantamount to 1000,000 fr.'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 206.

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Quack Pills and Poetry

Anon

Genre:

Rejoinder, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Periodicals


    A discussion of the response of the Hygeist Hygeist (1842–67) Waterloo Directory
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(an organ of James Morison Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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) to Punch's attack on an advertisement identifying William Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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anticipation of Morison's 'Vegetable Pills' (see Anon, 'The Toxicology of Shakespeare', Punch, 42 (1862), 182). Punch retorts that it is not for it to deny that the pill 'assimulates with' (from the Hygeist's adaptation of a passage in Shakespeare's Hamlet) or 'counterfeits, something or other in connection with the blood of man'. Agreeing that there may be a correspondence between Shakespeare's words and the description of the pills quotes the playwright's warning that 'the devil can quote Scripture for his purpose', which corresponds to the quack borrowing from Shakespeare.



Punch,  42 (1862), 209–10.

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Industrial Handbook for the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Engineers, Invention, Industry, Government, Politics, Charlatanry, Progress, Military Technology, Steamships, Nutrition, Analytical Chemistry, Human Development, Sanitation

Institutions mentioned:

Lancet—Analytical Sanitary Commission Lancet—Analytical Sanitary Commission
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    Following the success of Palgrave 1862 Palgrave, Francis Turner 1862. Handbook to the Fine Art Collections in the International Exhibition of 1862, London: Macmillan and Co.
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, announces the publication of a spoof companion volume, a Handbook to the Industrial Department. Notes the difficulties encountered by the exhibition commissioners in finding judges who can be as harsh on exhibits as those in the fine art department. However, proceeds to describe some of the judges who, as it is later ironically pointed out, have been appointed because they have the 'most unbiassed and best-informed opinion on the various classes of the Exhibition, accompanied by that healthy and high-minded criticism, which will at once serve as a lesson to exhibitors'. The judges include 'an ex-analyst of the Lancet Lancet (1823–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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' to judge the 'Substances used in Food', William G Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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and Joseph Whitworth Whitworth, Sir Joseph, 1st Baronet (1803–87) ODNB
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to judge each other's inventions in gunnery, and a Morison Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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pill vendor to judge 'Pharmaceutical Substances and processes'. Goes on to present a specimen of the judges' comments on nautical inventions, foodstuffs, candles, and soaps. These are either ecstatically praiseworthy or downright hostile. For example, the Admiralty's Admiralty
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exhibit of 'Sixteen models representing the progress of Naval Architecture from the first ship of the Royal Navy, 1499, to the present time', is attacked as representing the 'crass stupidity and brutal indifference to the suggestions of inventors which has always marked the Admiralty' and as showing the superiority of the naval architecture of 1488 to that of the present day, which shows 'human baseness', and the 'ignorance of the principles of flotation, equilibrium, and hydrostatic force'. In contrast, the 'Model of S. DE C. F.'s Unsinkable Ship, submitted by the Inventor without effect to successive Board of Admiralty, from 1820 to 1862' prompts such praiseworthy comments as 'the inventor [...] has shown the profoundest knowledge of the great and officially unknown laws which govern floating bodies' and 'Mark the thoughtful humanity of the apparatus for instantly annihilating the enemy'. (209)



Punch,  42 (1862), 212.

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Hints for Pensive Puffs

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Instruments

People mentioned:

John Dollond Dollond, John (1706–61) DSB
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Issue 1090 (31 May 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 213–14.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Museums, Government, Politics, Natural History, Zoology, Military Technology, Mental Illness, Engineering


    Includes a discussion of the debate on the British Museum British Museum
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Bill, in which William E Gladstone Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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proposed sending the 'beasts' to Kensington where they could be housed for £680,000, a move opposed by William H Gregory Gregory, Sir William Henry (1816–92) ODNB
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who sought to retain the animals in the museum. Notes that Henry C G G Lennox Lennox, Lord Henry Charles George Gordon- (1821–86) ODNB, s.v. Lennox, Charles Gordon
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'would not put his opinion against' that of Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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whose 'demand for space for whales' was ridiculed by Ralph Bernal Osborne Bernal Osborne, Ralph (1808?–82) ODNB
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. Concludes by noting that the government was defeated on this bill 163 to 71. Later discusses debates on the 'shot-proof ships', the Lunacy Bill, and the attempt by the engineer John Hawkshaw Hawkshaw, Sir John (1811–91) ODNB
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to 'save England from the sea'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 216.

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The May Meeting in Rome

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Military Technology


    Responding to news of the large number of bishops and cardinals in Rome, plays on the double-entendre of the word canon, suggesting that 120 'great guns of the Church' are necessary for the 'canonisation of martyrs', a procedure of the 'ecclesiastical artillery' which it considers as expensive as 'a cannonade ought to be, even though the ordnance should consist of the biggest Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 219.

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Our Own Correspondent

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Light, Amusement, Military Technology, Steamships


    Describes his experiences of a 'five shilling-day' at the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. Likens the view down the great nave of the exhibition building to a 'Brobdingnag kaleidoscope out of order'. Describes the trophies made from guns, groceries, and toys, noting that the toy trophy contains 'dolls that wink or squeak under certain mechanical influence, known only to the proprietors'. Dwells on the 'military engineering department' whose exhibits include Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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guns, samples of gun-metal, and ammunition carts, and a 'model of an iron-cased steam-ram ship', which is highly manoeuvrable and powerful.



Punch,  42 (1862), 220–21.

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Reform and the Readers

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Museums, Government, Natural History, Reading, Textbooks, Periodicals


    Noting that while Anthony Panizzi Panizzi, Sir Anthony (1797–1879) ODNB
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has not been able to remove the beasts from the British Museum British Museum
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(a measure included in the government's recently defeated British Museum Bill), he has ordered boys to leave the museum and stop 'lounging on the Museum chairs for which a DARWIN Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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, a BUCKLE Buckle, Henry Thomas (1821–62) ODNB
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, a FARADAY Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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, a MAURICE Maurice, John Frederick Denison (1805–72) ODNB
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or a PUNCH may be waiting'. Advises Panizzi to 'clear away a whole heap of people' who have no business in the library because, according to Mr Punch's survey, they only read relatively inexpensive books that are readily available elsewhere. (220) His survey reveals that these works include Timbs 1857 Timbs, John 1857. Things Not Generally Known: Curiosities of History with New Lights; a Book for Old and Young, London: David Bogue
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, volumes of the Mirror of Literature Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction (1822–47) Mirror Monthly Magazine (1847–49) Waterloo Directory
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, La Belle Assemblée Belle Assemblée, La (1806–32) Court Magazine (1832–48) Waterloo Directory
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, Livingstone 1857 Livingstone, David 1857. Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa: Including a Sketch of Sixteen Years' Residence in the Interior of Africa, and a Journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loanda, on the West Coast; Thence Across the Continent, Down the River Zambesi, to the Eastern Ocean, London: John Murray
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, and Burton 1621 [Burton, Robert] 1621. The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it is. With all the Kindes, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostickes, and Severall Cures of it. In Three Maine Partitions with their Severall Sections, Members, and Subsections. Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically, Opened and Cut up. By Democritus Junior. With a Satyricall Preface, Conducing to the Following Discourse, Oxford: H. Cripps
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. Mr Punch concludes that these readers, 'for whose sake the world is ransacked year by year to bring literary treasures together', should read at home (221).



Punch,  42 (1862), 221.

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Poetry by a Musician

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Music


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Issue 1091 (7 June 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 225.

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Best Japan Blacking!  [1/2]Anon, 'Japan at Epsom', Punch, 42 (1862), 240–41

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Reminscences, Spoof

Subjects:

Cultural Geography, Race, Gender, Exhibitions, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Military Technology


    This article contains the impressions of a 'Japanese Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary' on his tour of Britain, which include observations on the 'hideous red and white' complexions, the 'invariably white' teeth, and 'long hair' of British men. He goes on to note that his visit to the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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showed that British women were 'even uglier than men' and 'cruelly treated': for example, they are not allowed to 'pluck out their eyebrows' and are 'forced to wear, cover the whole person, and are distended to an enormous extent by hoops of steel'. Wonders whether women are 'ever out of their cages' and notes the strange eating habits of the British. However, considers the 'barbarians of Great Britain' to be 'gentle, tractable, and willing to learn', and describes the British preoccupation with constructing 'implements of destruction'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 229.

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Punch Counselleth King Cole Touching the International Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Commerce, Government, Machinery, Invention

People mentioned:

William Fairbairn Fairbairn, Sir William (1789–1874) ODNB
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    Praising Henry Cole Cole, Sir Henry (1808–82) ODNB
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, the Secretary of the Department of Science and Art Department of Science and Art
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, as a 'potent soul' who has 'spread FOWKE'S Fowke, Francis (1823–65) ODNB
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design' and stretched his 'royal sway' from 'Boilers to Dish-covers', urges Cole to consider Punch's criticisms of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. Considers the need to clear the exhibition of its artefacts and wonders who will bear the cost of 'clearing this rubbish away'—the 'Commission who bade this Trade to build, or the Trade who but built as bid'. Goes on to the 'matter of Toll', specifically the high cost of the 'flimsy' exhibition catalogue and unsatisfactory refreshments, and warns Cole that 'this grabbing at fees, from tradespeople and contractors, / Is what Punch has lashed play-managers for, and other vulgar extractors'. Informs him that if 'printers, purveyors, and all that tribe, must tip the Commission a fee' then he should 'drop a hint to Charles W Dilke' Dilke, Charles Wentworth (1789–1864) ODNB
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, one of the commissioners for the exhibition.



Punch,  42 (1862), 230.

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[Photographing the Sphinx Sphinx, Cairo
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]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Photography, Archaeology


Punch,  42 (1862), 231.

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'Bird-Cage Walk'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour, Music


Punch,  42 (1862), 231.

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Do Not Call Names

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Religion, Religious Authority, Unbelief, Philosophy


    Questions whether Roden B W Noel's Noel, Roden Berkeley Wriothesley (1834–94) ODNB
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claim that the French are 'given over' to 'philosophical Pantheism' will not be understood by his Exeter Hall Exeter Hall, Strand
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audience, insisting that 'Pantheism may, in a great many cases, be the habit of mind that is averse to appealing to first causes and using solemn names upon all occasions'. Considers Noel unphilosophical for condemning a 'nation that got so far as to laugh at priestcraft'.



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Issue 1092 (14 June 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 234.

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Rejected Medical Advice (By a Scotchman)

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Cultural Geography


    'Try your native air'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 235.

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Farmers Killing their Friends

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Hunting, Cruelty, Commerce, Agriculture, Natural History, Disease, Animal Behaviour


    Urges that the Journal of the Horticultural Society of London Journal of the Horticultural Society of London (1846–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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publish an article warning the 'country bumpkins that can read' not to 'set a price upon the heads of sparrows and other small birds, and [not to] poison the pretty warbling squire'. Questions why squires and conservative landowners have not protested against 'the destructive policy thus pursued by clay-brained agriculturists'. Addressing himself to 'farmers and gardeners', the author stresses that the destruction of small birds allows pests to proliferate and thus ruin crops, and the fact that in France the government has banned the barbarous practice because it caused a 'plague of insects'. Goes on to debunk the notion that birds eat fruit and grain and points out that these animals have actually been introduced into Britain for 'consuming' thistle.


See also:

Anon, 'A Small Words for the Small Birds', Punch, 42 (1862), 17 , Cock Robin, 'Birds and Beasts', Punch, 42 (1862), 190


Punch,  42 (1862), 236.

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The Height of Liberality

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment

People mentioned:

Thomas Holloway, Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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James Morison Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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Punch,  42 (1862), 239.

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The Gem of the Show

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Light, Instruments


Punch,  42 (1862), 240–41.

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Japan at Epsom  [2/2]Anon, 'Best Japan Blacking!', Punch, 42 (1862), 225

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Reminiscences, Spoof

Subjects:

Cultural Geography, Animal Behaviour, Race


    Further observations on the habits of the 'English Barbarians' by the 'Japanese Envoy Extraordinary, to the Head Daimio of the Department for Correspondence touching the Barbarians'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 241.

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The Cat's Walk

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Religious Authority, Prognostication


    The initial letter is formed by an illustration showing a mouse trying to decapitate a cat by using the vertically sliding door of a small construction as a guillotine. Describing the complex way in which a cat walks towards somebody who calls it, the text likens it to the tortuous trajectory of a legal case concerning the property of a follower of Joanna Southcott Southcott, Joanna (1750–1814) ODNB
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, which was to be used to publish the writings of the 'unreal prophetess'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 241.

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Table-Turning Parliamentary

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Politics, Language


    Thinks that Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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has surpassed Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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because he recently 'completely turned the table on the Opposition'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 242.

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A New Song for the New Navy

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Written from the perspective of a naval officer, who urges his lads to 'cheer up' because their ship has strong armour. The chorus zealously describes the iron hulls and guns of the ship with which the sailors will 'conquer again and again'. Subsequent verses note the passing of the days of sail, the safety and formidable strength of iron-hulled ships, and the fire-power of the 'four guns' mounted on the ships.



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Issue 1093 (21 June 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 243.

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[Cruelty to Animals]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Human Species, Gender, Cruelty, Crime


    Shows an omnibus driver helping a stout woman onto his vehicle. He tells his friend to 'Make them two full-growes uns sit forrard. I don't want to get a Month for Cru'lty to Animals'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 245.

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A Real American Grievance

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Military Technology, Cultural Geography, Nationalism


    The text insists that despite the claim of the 'Yankees' to be 'the Fastest nation in all creation, they still lag five hours behind slow old England'. The illustration shows a man riding a shell fired from a cannon in a British fort, the caption explaining that the figure is 'Merely going to inquire about the Seizure of the British Steam-ship "Bermuda" Bermuda, ship
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by the Yankee Frigate "Mercedita" Mercedita, ship
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'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 245.

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Employment for Women

Mundungus Mundungus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Gender, Education

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Institution Royal Institution of Great Britain
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Punch,  42 (1862), 246, 248.

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Missionary Swells

Tremaine Tremaine
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Class, Human Development, Education, Race, Human Species, Religion


    Prompted by a recent sitting of the Social Science Congress Social Science Congress
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, presents his suggestion for 'ameliorating the behaviour of the industrious classes'. He urges that 'some of us fellows should go among them as missionaries' and improve their speech, spelling, and manners. (246) Details how he would conduct this mission while accompanying the 'industrious classes' to the sea-side. Concludes by stressing that 'we ought all to love our species, and the People are our species; although they seem a different race', and that the reason a 'fellow' seeks to 'improve the Million' is because he finds the 'idea that they are a fellow's fellow men [...] so deuced humiliating'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 251.

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The Removal of a Nuisance

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Horticulture, Display, Exhibitions, Gender


    The intial letter is part of an illustration showing two women, 'one an emaciated and craggy reflection of the other', who are divided by a large plant apparently in the plane of a mirror. The text calls for the removal of the 'hideous tents, that selfishly block the view of the Horticultural Gardens Royal Horticultural Society—Gardens, Chiswick
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from the windows of the Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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refreshment rooms'. Wishes the fellows of the Royal Horticultural Society Royal Horticultural Society
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would organize the tents in order to convey the 'graceful and sweet' lessons taught by flowers, and criticizes the exhibition directors for erecting the tents whilst drunk.



Punch,  42 (1862), 252.

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Blondin Blondin, Charles (Jean François Gravelet) (1824–97) CBD
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in a Breeze

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Prognostication

People mentioned:

Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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Issue 1094 (28 June 1862)Expand    Contract

Punch,  42 (1862), 253.

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Who is to be Coroner?

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Crime, Expertise


    Responding to the decision to appoint a second coroner, discusses whether doctors or lawyers make better coroners. Noting that 'the duty of the coroner is to ascertain the causes of death', argues that doctors, who have the 'reputation' of helping to 'shorten a patient's life', and who are 'more likely to know the cause of death', will make better coroners. Concludes by announcing Mr Punch's preference for Edwin Lankester Lankester, Edwin (1814–74) ODNB
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as coroner.



Punch,  42 (1862), 255.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Museums, Zoology, Exhibitions, Government, Politics


    Reports that the government is '"considering" what is to be done about the British Museum British Museum
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and the Beasts', and suggests that they be put into the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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when the 'Show' is cleared out of it.



Punch,  42 (1862), 256.

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Punch for Coroner

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Expertise


    Presents Mr Punch's reasons why he should be considered for the vacant 'Office of Coroner'. These include knowing 'nothing about Medicine' and being 'utterly ignorant of the rules of evidence'.



Punch,  42 (1862), 256.

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Botany at One's Fingers' Ends

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture, Display, Botany, Natural History,


    Responding to a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of the 'hand tree' exhibited at the most recent show of the Royal Horticultural Society Royal Horticultural Society
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, suggests that the plant is a 'new species of palm', which 'wears nothing but fox-gloves', for it is 'hand-and-glove with Digit-alis'.



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