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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 44  (January to June 1863)

Punch,  44 (1863), [iii]–iv.

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Preface

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Discovery, Comparative Philology


    Describes a conversation between Mr Punch and the irritable Father Nile in which the latter boasts of his achievements and qualities. Mr Punch asks him whether he is grateful to John H Speke Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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and James A Grant Grant, James Augustus (1827–92) ODNB
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for 'inventing' him and getting him 'talked about' by Roderick I Murchison Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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in front of 'the most distinguished and intellectual swells of the Metropolis of the World'.



Punch,  44 (1863), [v]–[vii].

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Introduction

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, War


Issue 1120* (27 December 1862) 'Punch's Almanack for 1863'Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), [i].

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Punch's Almanack

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners

People mentioned:

Benjamin Franklin, Franklin, Benjamin (1706–90) DSB
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Joseph Priestley, Priestley, Joseph (1733–1804) DSB
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William Harvey, Harvey, William (1578–1657) DSB
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Auguste Comte Comte, Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier (Auguste) (1798–1857) DSB
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Punch,  44 (1863), [ii].

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Autographs of Authors, For Albums

Author of What will he do with a Strange Story Author of What Will He Do With A Strange Story
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Extract, Spoof

Subjects:

Monstrosities, Mesmerism, Magnetism


    Alluding to Lytton 1862 Lytton, Edward George Lytton Bulwer 1862. A Strange Story, 2 vols, London: Sampson Low
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, the first extract describes the narrator's encounter with a 'monstrous Snake' to which he was drawn by 'Magnetic fascination'. In the second extract the narrator complains of the way in which firemen leave their pipes 'to trip up gentlemen'.



Punch,  44 (1863), [ii].

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Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface  [1/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Drollery

Subjects:

Astrology, Charlatanry, Prognostication


    Written to represent an individual of limited literacy and possessing an erratic nature, this begins by deriding the astrological 'Physicians' Richard J Morrison Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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and Francis Moore Moore, Francis (1657–1714?) ODNB
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, but then begins to speculate on the possible impact of Jupiter's location in Libra on international and domestic affairs. This includes 'Mother Goose's' series of spoof horoscopes.



Punch,  44 (1863), [iii].

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Baths and Washhouses

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Sanitation, Public Health, Class


Punch,  44 (1863), [iii].

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Voices of the Stars  [2/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication, Railways, Manufactories, Accidents


Punch,  44 (1863), [iii].

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Mathematics for the Misses

Anon

Genre:

Instructions, Spoof

Subjects:

Mathematics, Gender, Language


    Opening with a geometrical proposition, this article plays on the double meanings of the words 'square' and 'angle' to describe how 'CD a young lady' 'angles' for 'a husband' in the 'square' 'AB'.



Punch,  44 (1863), [iii].

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Domestic Economy and Medicine

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Domestic Economy, Nutrition


Punch,  44 (1863), [iv].

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Voices of the Stars  [3/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication, Spiritualism, Periodicals

Publications cited:

Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  44 (1863), [iv].

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Note on the Game Laws

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Hunting, Language


Punch,  44 (1863), [iv].

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Where Different People Should Live

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Language


Punch,  44 (1863), [v].

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Voices of the Stars  [4/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [viii].

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Voices of the Stars  [5/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [viii].

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Voices of the Stars  [6/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [ix].

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Voices of the Stars  [7/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [ix].

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Voices of the Stars  [8/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [ix].

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Lines on Autumn

A Gardner Gardner, A
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Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture, Language


Punch,  44 (1863), [ix].

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A Modern Oracle

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Mesmerism, Medical Treatment


Punch,  44 (1863), [ix].

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An Obtuse Angle

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics, Language


Punch,  44 (1863), [x].

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Voices of the Stars  [9/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [xi].

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Voices of the Stars  [10/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xii]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [xii].

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Voices of the Stars  [11/11]Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars, By Mother Goose. Mother Goose's Preface', Punch, 44 (1863), [ii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [iv]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [v]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [viii]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [ix]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [x]
Mother Goose, 'Voices of the Stars', Punch, 44 (1863), [xi]

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Mother Goose Goose, Mother
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Genre:

Serial, Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


Punch,  44 (1863), [xii].

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Love and Caloric

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Heat, Psychology


Punch,  44 (1863), [xii].

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'Un Succès d'Estime'

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Progress


Punch,  44 (1863), [xii].

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A Fact for the French

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Vaccination, Discovery, Nationalism

People mentioned:

Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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Issue 1121 (3 January 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 2.

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Note on Spirit-Rapping

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism


Punch,  44 (1863), 7.

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Heir-Hunting Among the West-Indians by the Author of 'A Shot from an Old Beau'

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Race, Ethnology, Gender, Superstition, Spiritualism


    Addressed to those interested in the 'curiosities of savage life', especially the 'practice of "wife-snatching among the Torokas"', the narrator describes a 'companion' custom of the 'West-Indians' in which 'a fair and bashful Maiden' of the tribe, controlled by the female chiefs of the tribe, catches her 'Heir' with a lasso. Proceeds to describe some of the customs and characteristics of the tribe, including their clubs (where heirs enjoy refuge from their female pursuers), the fact that they are 'very amiable and quite trustworthy' despite their 'predatory habits', their bartering for girls with 'trifling articles of virtú', and their talkativeness. Adds that the tribe is 'deplorably superstitious', linking slight noises, such as a 'rap on a table', to spirits.



Punch,  44 (1863), 9.

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Fashionable Arrivals

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Amusement, Religious Authority


    Describes the popularity of the 'Aye-aye' [at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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], and anticipates that the 'No-no' (Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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or Pio Nono) will also arrive in Britain. Notes that the No-no, like the Aye-aye, has 'mild and quiet habits' although it occasionally displays a 'savage temperament'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 9.

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At Christmas Many Suffer From Indigestion

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Publishing, Reading, Health, Medical Treatment


    Puffs Punch's Almanack Punch's Almanack (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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as a cure of indigestion, 'low spirits', and over-eating.



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Issue 1122 (10 January 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 11.

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Name-Changers

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Quackery, Publishing


    Announcing the possibility of people changing their names by publishing their 'intentions', presents a list of eminent figures of the day who wish to change their names together with their choices of new names. These figures adopt the names of people they would like to emulate: for example, Benjamin Disraeli Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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wishes to change his to 'Bolingbroke' Saint-John, Henry, Viscount Bolingbroke (1678–1751) ODNB
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and Thomas Holloway Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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to 'Abernethy' Abernethy, John (1764–1831) ODNB
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.



Punch,  44 (1863), [15].

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Latest from Spirit-Land

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Politics, War


    Shows the ghosts of George Washington Washington, George (1732–99) CBD
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and King George III George III, King of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover (1738–1820) ODNB
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standing in the Elysian fields and contemplating the bloody American Civil War. George III asks Washington what he thinks of his 'fine republic now, eh?', to which Washington utters a 'Humph'. In the background, several female figures hold their heads in despair.



Punch,  44 (1863), 17.

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Capital Name for Sir Joshua Jebb's Jebb, Sir Joshua (1793–1863) ODNB
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Pet Lambs

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Crime, Human Development, Animal Behaviour


    'The Jo-Jebb-aways—a set of savages, worse than any Indians'—a reference to the convicts whose brutal tendencies are not markedly quelled by Jebb's relaxed system of incarceration.



Punch,  44 (1863), 19.

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Men and Monkeys

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Travel, Descent, Evolution, Animal Development, Race


    Discusses 'A Fact for Mr. Darwin Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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'—the report of a visit to Madagascar which revealed that the inhabitants 'claim descent from the [...] native baboon'. Argues that although humans may not be alike, they share with the baboon a 'family likeness' that confirms their descent from monkeys. Thinks the missing link between the 'bimana and quadrumana' of the country may be the 'howling Yahoo' found in Ireland and America.



Punch,  44 (1863), 20.

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The District Telegraph. Invaluable to the Man of Business

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Telegraphy, Technology, Progress, Commerce


    Shows two business partners in a Fleet Street office. One partner holds a telegram in his hand and, after expressing his wonder at this age of steam and gas, boasts to his colleague of the 'facilities offered us by electricity', and points out that he has just received a telegram which was sent from nearby Oxford Street 'only' the previous afternoon.



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Issue 1123 (17 January 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 22.

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The American Eagle

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Natural History, Taxonomy, Animal Behaviour, War, Politics, Nationalism

People mentioned:

John J Audubon Audubon, John James (1785–1851) DSB
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    Describes the American nation as if it were a bird of prey. The features and habits of this 'aërial Republican' include turning 'a disdainful tail upon those ancient Courts where garbage and aristocracy abide'. Ironically notes the ability of birds bred in 'different quarters of the great transatlantic continent—for example, North and South—sitting on the same perch' to show 'their willingness to live or die together'. Goes on to describe the 'President of the Crags and Mountain-tops' who is usually extremely amiable, except when it faces the 'old English Bull-dog', against which it 'manifests the fiercest animosity'. Observes that 'the Britisher is a cheerful old dog', regards with 'indifference' the hostility of the Yankee Eagle, and would 'gladly form one of a "happy family" embracing among other denizens of the Menagerie, the Yankee Eagle, the Gallican Cock, and the great Russian Bear'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 27.

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The Convict Commission

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Crime, Sanitation


Punch,  44 (1863), 29.

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'Sensation' Sufferers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Amusement, Accidents, Medical Treatment


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Issue 1124 (24 January 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 31.

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Nursery Rhymes

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Medical Treatment, Quackery


    Includes a limerick describing 'an Old Girl of South Kilworth' who asks 'the homeopath, Dr. Dilworth Dilworth, Dr (homeopath) (fl. 1863) PU1/44/4/1
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[...] What's such a ridiculous pill [his globule] worth?'



Punch,  44 (1863), 33.

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Charity and Chronology

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Periodicals, Publishing, Astronomy


    Describes the Dramatic Almanack Dramatic Almanack (cited 1869) PU1/56/5/1
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, a publication containing valuable information for anybody interested in theatre. It boasts complete 'astronomical intelligence' and contains 'a perfect registry of all the movements of the "stars"', with times of their first riding as well as those when they have set'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 34.

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Old Abe Lincoln, Abraham (1809–65) CBD
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in a Fix; or, A Hard Rail to Split

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Race, Government, Mining

People mentioned:

Roderick I Murchison Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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Punch,  44 (1863), 37.

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The Starling of the Vatican

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour, Religious Authority


    An implicit comparison of Pope Piux IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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to an ageing starling in his 'costly cage', this poem describes the bird's 'poor old wings / Clipped close as shears can shave', his 'draggled tail', and his memories of the 'days gone by' when he used to chant 'Non possumus, possumus, possumus' and related catechisms. Notes the bird's hatred of the 'watchful hand that coops / His dark and dreary age', his quest for freedom from the 'French gaolers' [a reference to the pope's hostility to Piedmont] and Britannia's offer of freedom on the island of Malta, rather than living 'caged in a Roman hall'. The bird remains and continues with his chant.



Punch,  44 (1863), 38.

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Old King Cotton

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Manufactories, Industry, Machinery, War


    Opens by describing how 'Old King Cotton' ordered his subjects, 'Bobbins and Jenny and Mules' and others, to stop work 'Till North and South live in amity'.



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Issue 1125 (31 January 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 48.

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[The New Class of Ship]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Steamships, Steam-power, Technology, Progress


    Shows an old sailor talking to a young boy who is about to float his model sailing ship on a river. The 'Old Salt' informs the boy, 'it's no use dewotin' your talents to building Wessels o' that there class, now-a-days', and advises him to 'inwent a sort o' Iron Biler as ull sail without Canwas' and get to 'Ameriky' without a rudder.



Punch,  44 (1863), 48.

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Soap for the Sleepy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Sanitation, Psychology


    Discusses an advertisement for 'Mental Toilet Soap', a soap that, when applied to the body, imparts a 'safe stimulant' that is ideal for public performers. Punch stresses the benefits of such a soap to teetotallers 'who no doubt must often feel themselves in want of a "safe stimulant"' and who will subsequently enjoy washing as much as drinking. Rejoices in the possibility that 'orators and Preachers', statesmen, and authors will be more alert after washing with the soap.



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Issue 1126 (7 February 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 52.

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The Royal Geographical Society

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof; Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Societies, Geology, Statistics


    Describes the 'official costume' to be worn by members of the Royal Geographical Society Royal Geographical Society
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at its 'usual weekly meetings'. The coat and trousers form 'a complete map of the world, the arms displaying geological strata, a charts of rivers of the world, and 'population returns', while the hat is a model of Mount Etna. The illustration shows a portly man modelling this costume.



Punch,  44 (1863), 52.

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The Panacea Proclaimed!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Crime, Controversy, Analytical Chemistry


    Announces the 'momentous' news of the 'statement of the composition of HOLLOWAY'S OINTMENT', a revelation made by Olof L Sillén Sillén, Olof Leopold (b. 1813) WBI
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, a Swedish physician who demanded £500 from Thomas Holloway Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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for securing a French patent for his ointment. In taking legal action against Holloway for breaking his agreement, Sillén revealed that Holloway considered his pills to be a 'great purifier of the blood' and that on analysing Holloway's ointment, 'authorised French chemists' established that it contained 'BUTTER, LARD, BORDEAUX, TURPENTINE, WHITE WAX, YELLOW WAX, AND NOTHING ELSE'. Noting Holloway's denial of this claim, Punch agrees with him but insists that the French chemists were right to suggest that there was nothing more 'material' in the ointment than the substances discovered. Reports that owing to its bland composition, the ointment did not provoke French fears of 'secret remedies' and was given a patent. Turning to Holloway's 'Pills', Punch adopts the suggestion published in The Family Doctor (probably Anon 1858-59 Anon. [1858–59]. The Family Doctor: Being a Complete Encyclopedia of Domestic Medicine and Household Surgery [...] By a Dispensary Surgeon, 2 vols, London: Houlston and Wright
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) that they contain 'vegetable matter like scammony, or jalap, or soap', and thus both pills and ointment that can be made by anyone. Concludes by noting that the French chemists agreed to license Holloway's treatment as a 'Pommade' and thus a likely basis for hair treatment.



Punch,  44 (1863), 53.

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Comfortable Convicts

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Crime, Sanitation, Health, Nutrition, Hydropathy


    Discusses the conclusions reached by Henry H M Herbert (4th Earl of Carnarvon) Herbert, Henry Howard Molyneux, 4th Earl of Carnarvon (1831–90) ODNB
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following his inspection of 'our pet-prisons', noting the high quality of the food, clothes, and cells enjoyed by the prisoners. Believes that 'such care is shown to keep them all in happiness and health, that one might fancy them inmates of a medical establishment, such as we find at Malvern or among the German baths'. Anticipates that 'if this state of things goes on, there will be yearly greater numbers of persons who are anxious to gain entrance to a gaol', and thus people will be committing crimes to enjoy better food. The illustration shows a convict enjoying his comfortable cell—smoking a cigar and reading a newspaper.



Punch,  44 (1863), 57.

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Snobs' Complaints of the Weather Office

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Periodicals, Scientific Practitioners, Astrology, Quackery, Imposture


    Notes the popularity of The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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weather forecasts written by Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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. Stresses Fitzroy's warning that his forecasts are 'conjectural; as merely probable inferences from observations in meteorology; an infant science', and that such phenomena as 'electrical change' can affect his calculations. Proceeds to describe complaints levelled at Fitzroy for being 'occasionally "out"' and treating him as if he were 'a professional weather prophet, a mercenary impostor, a charlatan, a quack, a Zadkiel Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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, or a Francis Moore Moore, Francis (1657–1714?) ODNB
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, a Physician'. Considers that the mildness of Fitzroy's replies emphasises the ridiculous and uncharitable nature of his assailants.



Punch,  44 (1863), 58.

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The Standard Bearer to the Confederate General Stuart Stuart, James Ewell Brown ('Jeb') (1833–64) WBI
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[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

War, Telegraphy, Technology


    Shows a Confederate general riding a horse. His head is a telegraphic transmitting and receiving apparatus, and in one hand he holds an uprooted telegraph pole with wires streaming from the top. This represents James E B Stuart's attacks on Union telegraphic networks.



Punch,  44 (1863), 59.

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A Card

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Photography, Technology, Chemistry, Politics, Language


    Announcing his newly opened 'Photographic Establishment at Messrs. Blackwood's, London and Edinburgh', 'A. W. Kinglake' (the historian of the Crimean War Alexander W Kinglake Kinglake, Alexander William (1809–91) ODNB
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) invites 'persons holding conspicuous public position' to his establishment 'for producing life-like resemblances in small or large, either on the scale of the popular cartes-de-visite, or as magnified by the solar and osy-hydrogen apparatus'. The advertisement reflects Kinglake's admiration of Fitzroy J H Somerset (1st Baron Raglan) Somerset, Lord Fitzroy James Henry, 1st Baron Raglan (1788–1855) ODNB
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and hostility to Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France, and his desire to represent them in favourable and poor lights respectively. After describing his representation of the 'leading incidents in the careers of his illustrious sitters, he describes his dissolving views (including '"The Entente Cordiale" and "La Gloire Francaise"', for which he expects great demand in France), and announces his invention of a process for 'taking portraits which entirely dispenses with natural light'. This process enables the subject to appear in shade (notably Napoleon III) or 'under the effect of couleur de rose (notably Raglan and 'other English Generals'). He also announces his invention and processes which clearly reflect his hostility to the French: a 'new Anti-Gallic Acid' which brings out the 'lights and darks' of sitters and his 'stock of double-distilled Gall-odium'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 60.

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The Latest Imperial Cartes de Visite

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Photography, Politics, Language


    Shows Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France sitting in a photographic studio. Standing in front of Napoleon and near his camera is his severe critic, Alexander W Kinglake Kinglake, Alexander William (1809–91) ODNB
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(the historian of the Crimean War) represented as a photographer, who urges the emperor that he needs to 'be much more in shade'. Like Henry R Howard, 'The Standard Bearer to the Confederate General Stuart', Punch, 44 (1863), 58 this plays on the double meaning of shade and uses photography to comment on French politics.



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Issue 1127 (14 February 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 62–63.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Surgery, Instruments, War


    Strongly supports the condemnation by James H Harris (3rd Earl of Malmesbury) Harris, James Howard, 3rd Earl of Malmesbury (1807–89) ODNB
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of the declaration by the Union states that 'medicines and surgical instruments' are 'contraband of war'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 63.

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Nursery Rhymes

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Electricity, Human Development


    Includes a limerick describing 'A Young Lady of Alnwick, / Whose touch was so highly galvanic, / That the people she'd meet / Used to spring on both feet, / And fly down the street in a panic'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 68.

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Punch's Cookery Book

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition


Punch,  44 (1863), 70.

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Eye Life

Wormwood Scrubbs Scrubbs, Wormwood
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Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Light, Instruments, Medical Treatment, Politics


    Strongly objects to the implications of an advertisement for 'Patent Newly-Invented Spectacles' that have been patronised by Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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, among others. Stresses that Palmerston's 'vision was never clearer than it is at present' and 'shows no signs of growing defective'.



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Issue 1128 (21 February 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), [71].

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Mokeana; or, The White Witness  [1/5]Francis C Burnard, 'Mokeanna; Or, the White Witness', Punch, 44 (1863), [115]–16

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Burnand, Francis Cowley 1873. Mokeanna!: A Treble Temptation, London: Bradbury, Agnew & Co.
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Genre:

Serial—Illustration; Short Fiction

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Human Development, Descent, Evolution, Animal Behaviour


    This opening full-page article is a notable departure for Punch: it is designed to resemble the first page of a serialised sensation novel, with opening illustration and three columns of text. The illustration shows a simian-looking character riding a horse during a thunderstorm at night. The text describes the arrival in England of two figures, one 'a short, stout, hunchbacked man, about six feet three in height', who tries to climb a vertical cliff face using his teeth to grip on to projections from the cliff ([71]). Later the hunchback steals a horse, 'Moke Anna, or Mokeanna', from a farm where he finds morsels of meat to eat and which he later sets on fire (72). He makes his escape on the horse.


Reprinted:

Burnand 1873 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1873. Mokeanna!: A Treble Temptation, London: Bradbury, Agnew & Co.
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Punch,  44 (1863), 77.

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A Dark Lantern

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Light, Invention, Instruments, Mathematics, Amusement


Punch,  44 (1863), 78.

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[The Prison Surgeon]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Class


    Shows a young 'Street Arab' talking to a friend. He points to an approaching 'Swell' as his 'Medikle Man', which Punch suggests identifies the latter character as the boy's 'young friend and Prison Surgeon'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 78.

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How About the Rappers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Periodicals


    Suggests reasons for the absence of news about 'the Spirit Rappers' including the possibility of mediums becoming 'honest', their want of 'simpletons' to be tricked, and the success of 'Punch's cudgel' against them.



Punch,  44 (1863), 79.

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Political Economy (As Understood by Most of Our Politicians)

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Political Economy, Commerce, Politics


    A series of maxims describing ways in which one can lose money, including 'To buy in the dearest market, and to sell in the cheapest', and 'To increase your expenditure in proportion as your neighbour increases his'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 80.

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Spiritual Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Government, Politics


    Reports that King Wilhelm I Wilhelm I, Emperor of Germany and King of Prussia (1797–1888) CBD
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of Prussia has been visited by the spirit of King Charles I Charles I, King of England, Scotland and Ireland (1600–49) ODNB
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, who warned him not to 'try to govern without a Parliament'.



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Issue 1129 (28 February 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 82–83.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Sanitation, Railways, Aesthetics, Government


    Notes forthcoming bills about 'nasty smells in rivers', the discussion of the proposal of the Great Eastern Railway Company Great Eastern Railway Company
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to turn Finsbury Circus into a station, and William Tite's Tite, Sir William (1798–1873) ODNB
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complaint of the 'hideousness of the railway additions to London' (82).



Punch,  44 (1863), 84.

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Raising the Wind

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Pneumatics


    Hopes that the London Pneumatic Despatch Company London Pneumatic Despatch Company
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will 'continue their operations' despite 'internal disagreements' and the fact that they have 'come to blows'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 87.

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Geographical

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Railways


    Insists that the equator is at Vauxhall Station, since the South Western Railway Company London and South-Western Railway Company
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requests passengers not to 'cross the Line'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 87.

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Geographical Tables Turned

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Politics, Language


    Notes that while Russia is known to make one daily revolution around the 'Pole', it has only recently been established that 'the Pole purposes making one continual revolution about Russia'—a reference to the recent Polish uprising against Russian rule.



Punch,  44 (1863), 88.

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A Chance for Three Hospitals

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Hospitals, Patronage, Mental Illness


    Discusses a circular letter sent by W J Nixon Nixon, W J (fl. 1863) PU1/44/9/5
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to 'Bethlem' (i.e. Bethlehem Royal Hospital Bethlehem Royal Hospital
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) and St Thomas's Hospital St Thomas's Hospital
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, which explains that Henry W Peek Peek, Sir Henry William, 1st Baronet (1825–98) WBI
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has offered to give a large freehold site for the new Bethlem Hospital on the condition that St Thomas's is rebuilt on the site of the old Bethlem Hospital and that twenty thousand guineas is given to the London Hospital London Hospital
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. Upholding the need to place lunatics in a better environment and the need to support the London Hospital, Punch concludes that the authorities of Bethlem and St Thomas's should be sent to Bedlam (i.e. to the Bethlehem Royal Hospital itself) if they decline this offer, and expects the British public to raise the sum for the London Hospital.



Punch,  44 (1863), 89.

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Saucy Questions

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Communication


    Presents the comments of the 'Clerk of the Weather' (i.e. the imaginary functionary supposed to control the weather) to Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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regarding the 'meteorological arrangements for Spring', now that Fitzroy has 'stolen upon him'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 89.

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Every Man His Own Quack

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Commerce, Reading


    Following Anon, 'The Panacea Proclaimed!', Punch, 44 (1863), 52, urges readers to stop paying '13½d for a box of Quack Pills' when they can make such remedies for themselves using ingredients from a druggist and recipes in 'any handbook of domestic medicine'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 89.

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Spiritualists Raising the Wind

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Religion, Patronage, Commerce, Crime


    Discusses a circular published by the Nottingham Spiritual Circle Nottingham Spiritual Circle
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requesting clergymen and aristocrats to contribute to a fund for publishing 'an entire new Bible' which they seek to produce following the command of 'Divine Revelation' received by a medium, John G H Brown Brown, John George Henry (fl. 1863) Barrow 1986
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. Castigating members of the Nottingham Spiritual Circle as fools and rogues, considers their impudence to be 'so marvellous as even to lend a certain plausibility to the pretence of Spiritualism', and that the poor grammar of the circular may illustrate the corrupting influence of evil spirits on 'good English'. Condemns the attempt by Brown to raise money for the so-called 'Message of God' as 'effrontery and idiotcy', and the spiritualist circle to which he belongs as a criminal 'Gang'.



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Issue 1130 (7 March 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 91.

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Rose-Colured Accidents

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents, Reading, Periodicals


    Discusses news of a recent accident on the newly opened underground railway in London. The accident prompted reports written in an 'off-hand' and light manner, but 'was the result of abominable carelessness on the part of somebody'. Punch urges the Metropolitan Railway Company Metropolitan Railway Company
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to 'look alive'. Recommending this 'cheerful style of reporting accidents, Punch gives some examples and anticipates that newspapers will be 'much more pleasant reading' as a result.



Punch,  44 (1863), 91.

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Ennobled Vegetables and Plants

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Horticulture, Breeding, Evolution, Language


    Reports that since the publication of Darwin 1859 Darwin, Charles Robert 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, London: John Murray
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, 'Horticulturalists have been making rapid strides in the improvement of the races of vegetables and plants', as suggested by the names of plants published in the Gardener's Chronicle Gardener's Chronicle (1841–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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(the 'student parsnip' and 'pedigree wheat') and the possibility of a four-leaved shamrock. Goes on to discuss the ways in which flowers are named after celebrities.



Punch,  44 (1863), 94.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Engineering, Government, Politics


    Reports on the protest by Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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against the number of new railway schemes which threaten to cut London 'into pieces', and to cause disruptions to thoroughfares, the demolition of buildings, and the likely construction of 'hideous viaducts and frightful termini'. Adds that Mr Punch hopes Derby will 'smash the Bill' to introduce the new railway schemes.



Punch,  44 (1863), 99.

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The French Hoop Nuisance

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Patenting


    Notes the rejection of an application for a patent for 'a particularly preposterous kind of Crinoline'.



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Issue 1131 (14 March 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 104.

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Piece-Work at South Kensington

Anon

Genre:

Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Education, Government, Lecturing


    Notes that the secretary of the Department of Science and Art Department of Science and Art
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, Henry Cole Cole, Sir Henry (1808–82) ODNB
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, is opposed to the proposal of Granville G Leveson-Gower (2nd Earl Granville) Leveson-Gower, Granville George, 2nd Earl Granville (1815–91) ODNB
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that the Committee of Council on Education Committee of Council on Education
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should pay clerks 'by results'. Believing that this will create jobbery, Cole is reported to have tried the 'experiment' on his 'scientific staff'. Punch presents an 'official scale of payments', which range from 10s for 'delivery a lecture' to 3d for 'speaking to a Porter'. Concludes by reporting Cole's notion that science is 'like sugar' insofar as it 'should be bought over the counter when you want it at a fixed price per job'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 110.

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Is Fox-Hunting Injurious?

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Hunting, Cruelty, Class


    Discusses a row between 'gushing gents who write for the cheap press' and 'a certain noble duke' who killed a fox being hunted by his 'rich neighbours' and which had run onto his land. The 'Gushers' regarded this as 'an act of overbearing tyrannical oppression' of a 'freeborn British subject', the fox. Stresses that Mr Punch does not think the 'Gushers' have good grounds for being so abusive towards the duke, regarding fox hunting as 'a national fine English institution, and does more good to the country than the gushing gents may know'. He rejects the 'Gushers'' claim that fox-hunting is 'frivolous and foolish' and insists that it is a pastime that 'brings classes together'. Preferring the 'fine old country fox-hunter' to that of a 'smoke-dried pumped-out individual' who takes his pleasures only in the town, he upholds the motto of '"Live and let live" [...] and don't kill foxes but by hunting them in fair and manly sport'. The illustration shows an aristocrat who, while riding a goose, pursues a fox.



Punch,  44 (1863), 111.

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A Royal Letter—The King of Dahomey and Sir Joshua Jebb

Dahomey R U Dahomey R
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J. Jebb U Jebb, J
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Crime, Morality, Medical Treatment


    Presents spoof correspondence between King Glele Glele, King of Abomey (fl. 1858–89) WBI
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of Dahomey, who perpetuated the West African nation's notorious slave trade, and the surveyor-general of prisons, Joshua Jebb Jebb, Sir Joshua (1793–1863) ODNB
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. The king tells Jebb ('Medicine Man') that his sympathetic modes of treating 'Grabbers' have not 'arrested' their moral 'disorder', and explains how people within his 'dominions' prefer 'some prompt and easy means of stopping the malady'. Gele welcomes any of Jebb's patients to Dahomey, where they will benefit from increased 'circulation'. In reply, Jebb acknowledges his correspondent's sympathy and explains that while his patients need a 'salubrious place of retreat', the climate of Dahomey would be too warm for individuals as 'morbidly sensitive as the Grabbers'. In a postscript, Jebb presents the reasons why his friend 'SIR GEORGE' (a reference to the Home Secretary George Grey Grey, Sir George (1799–1882) ODNB
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) does not think transporting the patients to Dahomey will be a good idea.



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Issue 1132 (21 March 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 113.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Government, Patronage

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Notes the 'Navy Debate' and the opposition to the government's proposal to 'build five new wooden ships to be coated with iron' by those who wish the ships to be built solely from iron. The government's proposal was, however, accepted.



Punch,  44 (1863), [115]–16.

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Mokeanna; Or, the White Witness  [5/5]Francis C Burnand, 'Mokeana; or, The White Witness', Punch, 44 (1863), [71]

Close

[Francis C Burnard] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Burnand, Francis Cowley 1873. Mokeanna!: A Treble Temptation, London: Bradbury, Agnew & Co.
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Genre:

Serial, Short Fiction, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment


Punch,  44 (1863), 118.

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A Character at Court

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Imposture


Punch,  44 (1863), 118.

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Transfer of St Thomas's

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Hospitals, Patronage


    Following the article on Henry W Peek's Peek, Sir Henry William, 1st Baronet (1825–98) WBI
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offer concerning the Bethlehem Royal Hospital Bethlehem Royal Hospital
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, St Thomas's Hospital St Thomas's Hospital
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, and the London Hospital London Hospital
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(Anon, 'A Chance for Three Hospitals', Punch, 44 (1863), 88), the author points out that Peek's condition that £21,000 should be given to the London Hospital could be met by the governors of St Thomas's, who would then be able to enjoy the benefits of relocating their hospital to the site of the old Bethlehem Hospital. Punch thinks the governors should announce whether or not they will do so.



Punch,  44 (1863), 121.

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Better than Baron Munchausen

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Charlatanry, Observation, Proof


    Opens by explaining how the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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has appeared to have answered Punch's earlier questions about the apparent disappearance of the 'Rappers' (Anon, 'How About the Rappers', Punch, 44 (1863), 78), by detailing some 'alleged spiritual phenomena' attributed to trickery by 'some gentlemen'. Proceeds to discuss a notice in the Spiritual Magazine on Home 1863 Home, Daniel Dunglas 1863. Incidents in My Life, London : Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green
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. Focuses on Daniel D Home's Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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description of an incident in which he found himself levitating and descending unconsciously among some aristocratic friends, and questions why Home did not reveal the name of the count who pulled off Home's boots 'against spiritual agency'. Proceeds to a similar incident related by Home in which the medium claimed to have levitated towards and written on a ceiling in the company of 'five gentlemen'. Punch asks for 'any credible and respectable person' to 'endorse Mr. Home's declaration', pointing out that 'There is an amount of testimony that would overcome the incredulity of even Mr. Punch' who would believe Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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, Michael Faraday Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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, and Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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if they confirmed 'the evidence of his own eyesight' that 'the Lion at Northumberland House' wagged its tail.



Punch,  44 (1863), 121.

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Deliverance from French Fashions

Taurus Taurus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture


Punch,  44 (1863), 122.

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Notes on Development

Owen Ap Shenkin U Shenkin, Owen Ap
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Philander U Philander
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Descent, Darwinism, Evolution, Human Development, Time, Gender


    Noting Thomas H Huxley's Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825–95) DSB
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claim that man has developed from '"some lower pithecoid form", say the Gorilla', the spoof letter-writer Owen Ap Shenkin questions the identity of 'our first parents'. Considers the possibility that man's infant prodigies were 'Adam and Eve', 'Gorillas', and mice, but points out that it is not plausible to stop with these. Instead, 'We must pursue our pedigree through all the gradations of animal life', noting that 'at least as many' species, 'beginning with the "pithecoid", lie between us and the first form'. Wonders whether 'our genealogy' will take us down to 'a filament of mould or lichen'. Proceeds to argue that consideration of the number of 'infant prodigies [...] developed in the course of man's 'progressive development'' forces acceptance of Huxley's claim for the greater antiquity of man, and the notion of a vastly increased number of prodigies. Concludes by dismissing the idea of tracing his ancestry 'to the monad of a million years ago [...] to the slug'. Philander presents a much more hysterical reply to the notion of 'Progressive Development' and, moreover, the 'Origin of Woman from the Gorilla'—the latter possibility conflicting with the narrator's experiences of female beauty as presented at the recent royal wedding procession to mark the marriage of Prince Edward Edward VII, King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India (1841–1910) ODNB
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.



Punch,  44 (1863), 124.

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The Feast of Lanterns

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Light, Invention, Electricity, Display


    Describing the celebrations on the occasion of the marriage of Prince Edward Edward VII, King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India (1841–1910) ODNB
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, recalls the lavish illuminations used in the London streets, noting the 'huge sea lanterns' that 'dimly showed on WREN'S Wren, Sir Christopher (1632–1723) DSB
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cathedral height [St Paul's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral
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' but laments the fact that 'Science rather made a mull with her electric light'.



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Issue 1133 (28 March 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 125.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Transport, Government, Class

People mentioned:

John Brady Brady, John (1812–87) Stenton 1976WBI
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Punch,  44 (1863), 126.

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[Anatomical Plates]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Anatomy, Representation


    Shows a 'Youthful Artist' in an art dealer's shop. He asks the old woman behind the counter whether she sells 'Anatomical Plates' to which the woman replies 'no; we don't keep no Crockery here!'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 126.

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Fighting with Shadows

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Light, Psychology, Amusement


    Noting the 'Red Spectre of Democracy' which the advisers of King Wilhelm I Wilhelm I, Emperor of Germany and King of Prussia (1797–1888) CBD
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of Prussia hold up to him, anticipates that John H Pepper Pepper, John Henry (1821–1900) ODNB
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, the great hand 'at playing with spectres', will 'expose' the 'Red Spectre' as an illusion, and perhaps 'embody the result of his experiments in the form of a most laughable Spectre-Farce'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 128.

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Our Railway Capital

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Environmentalism, Engineering, Pollution, Sanitation, Public Health, Secularism


    Lamenting the prospect of 'thirty Railways or so' intersecting London, suggests abandoning attempts to improve the capital. These include the Thames Embankment Thames Embankment
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, which will be spoilt by myriad railway bridges, and the metropolitan drainage works, which will serve a city whose population has been driven out by the 'stench' and 'noise' of the new railway lines. Responding to a proposal to secularise 'old useless City Churches', suggests that St Paul's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral
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be 'likewise desecrated', since it is likely to be ruined by a nearby railway. Ironically suggests turning the cathedral into a railway terminus.



Punch,  44 (1863), 134.

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The Armstrong Pacificator

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Politics, Human Development, Race, Morality


    Opens by questioning whether William G Armstrong's Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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'last new cannon' will prove a 'peculiar boon' to the 'Doves of Peace', and proceeds to explain how his cannon can 'knock a hole slap' through the sides of any 'mail-clad man-of war'. Jove's thunderbolts pale into insignificance when compared with Armstrong's six-hundred pound shot. Ponders who should be entrusted with such a weapon, pointing to those who would 'never tempt to strike a needless blow', and whether the gun could 'impose' conditions on mankind such as the end of the 'Grand Customs of Dahomey' (slavery), the rights of negroes, and the emancipations of the Poles (from Russian rule). Concludes by insisting that the Armstrong gun will protect English 'hearths and homes' and rejoices in the weapon.



Punch,  44 (1863), 135.

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Ornithology

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour, Politics


    Explains to its 'Correspondent Birdcatcher' that 'a Thrush always builds its nest in a horse's hoof', and that the relationship between French and English birds is that 'Louis d'or [a reference to Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France] is first cousin and not cousin German to a Jack Daw'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 135–36.

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Poland's Chain-Shot

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Breeding, War, Politics


    Opens by describing the pervasiveness in 'Creation, high and low' of the tendency of mothers to spurn foes who attack their young. Considers this in the context of the 'rage' of Poland, which refused to obey the orders of Tsar Alexander II Alexander II, Tsar of Russia (1818–81) CBD
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of Russia to 'Tear Poland's son from Poland's heart'—to force Poles to fight for the Russians against their 'mother' country. Goes on to describe how 'mother' Poland leapt 'at her oppressor's throat' and after a struggle forced Russia 'to fly'. Likens the Polish uprising to 'bees around a baffled bear'. (135)



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Issue 1134 (4 April 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 137–38.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Commerce, Observatories, Railways, Environmentalism, Telegraphy, Government, Measurement, Accidents


    Describes the fierce debate over the British export of warships to the Confederate forces in the American Civil War. Also notes the attempt of Edward A Seymour (12th Duke of Somerset) St Maur [formerly Seymour], Edward Adolphus, 12th Duke of Somerset (1804–85) ODNB
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to protect the Royal Observatory, Greenwich Royal Observatory, Greenwich
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, 'against the railway people' which Punch thinks 'may be as well' since 'the slightest joggling of a telescope' might produce errors in the Nautical Almanack and thus cause the Great Eastern Great Eastern, ship
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to strike a rock (137). Later, notes the House of Lords House of Lords
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rejection of a bill to turn Finsbury Circus into a terminus for the Great Eastern Railway Company Great Eastern Railway Company
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, and discussion of the 'Telegraph Bill' giving companies the right to 'hang wires [...] wherever they like' (138).



Punch,  44 (1863), 138.

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An Excess of Charity

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary,

Subjects:

Death, Sanitation, Putrefaction, Pollution, Religious Authority, Religion, Superstition


    Discusses a Liverpool Mail Liverpool Mail (1836–81) Waterloo Directory
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report of a Roman Catholic priest who, after burying a Protestant child in a Catholic cemetery, purified the ground. Questioning the priest's motives, notes that the addition of the remains of a child to the ground could not have warranted the 'need of a disinfectant' and wonders if the priest has to purify the ground every time it is opened for a Protestant. Suggests that the priest must be a good customer for chloride of lime, but questions the implication that Catholic corpses do not need to be covered with this material: agrees that Catholics (and especially, the 'low Irish' Catholics) might indeed 'exhale' an air of 'sanctity', but that this is better treated with chloride of lime than holy water. Concludes that the priest must have used holy water and, doubting whether a child's corpse could have done any 'spiritual harm' to another corpse, suggests that his action of purification was a form of exorcism.



Punch,  44 (1863), 139.

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Jack's Miniature

Jack Oakum Oakum, Jack
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof; Song, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Technology, War, Commerce, Government

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich
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    The initial letter forms part of an illustration showing Neptune sitting in a shell-shaped boat powered by a steam engine, which is itself a saucer-shaped object driven by bellows worked by Neptune. The text is written from the perspective of an old seaman of limited literary ability, and in it he criticises the choice of Miniature Miniature, ship
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for the name of a 'noo Man o'War wot they're Goin too Larnch'. Later he expresses astonishment that the vessel will have five iron masts and insists that such 'floating coleskuttles' will 'poot a end To all C fitein and y?—cause no henemy, unless so b that h'es hintoxicated, will think o'cumin anigh 'em and then wot's too bkum of the Hadmiralty Admiralty
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'. He develops his views in a song entitled 'THE BRAVE OLD OKE', which upholds the material 'wot Has sarved britannyer long' despite the fact that 'Parleyment Houses of Parliament
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says ion his More strong'. Goes on to contrast the accuracy of the 'round canon Bawl' to the shells that 'has the sway', and to criticise the money spent 'shelling Out ot the Admiralty'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 139.

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Dearth of Army Surgeons

By Order By Order
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Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Class, Colleges


    Requests 'a considerable number of Clever Young Snobs to compete for the Commission of Surgeon in the Army Army
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' owing to 'an extreme Scarcity of Eligible Candidates'. Attributing the latter to the refusal of such men to be treated as anything other than gentlemen, asks that all applicants be fellows of the Royal College of Physicians Royal College of Physicians
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and the Royal College of Surgeons Royal College of Surgeons
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, doctors of medicine, and in possession of diplomas recognised under the Medical Registration Act. Adds that they must be prepared to be subjected to such humiliating rituals as occupying 'a position subordinate to that of every combatant officer, even the youngest Ensign'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 144.

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A Wrong by its Right Name

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Colleges, Commerce, Government


    Discusses a petition, 'signed by tradesmen and others', sent to the House of Commons House of Commons
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'praying for exemption from Income-Tax of all incomes up to and including £150 a-year', and another petition, signed by senior members of the Royal College of Physicians Royal College of Physicians
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and the Royal College of Surgeons Royal College of Surgeons
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, asking for 'readjustment of the Income-tax as between industrial earnings and the products of property'. Punch thinks this is a demand that the 'Legislature might possibly concede' and rejects the notion of taxing certain individuals—notably surgeons and physicians—on their income and property.



Punch,  44 (1863), 145.

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One Fool Makes Many

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Pharmaceuticals, Crime, Gender, Railways, Amusement, Religious Authority


    Discusses an advertisement for Dr Battledore's Battledore, Dr (fl. 1863) PU1/44/14/6
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lozenge for remedying 'nervousness', suggesting the possibility of the remedy being used by 'a nervous Paterfamilias' for confronting garotters, or by 'the most timid of the softer sex' for travelling on the London underground line (i.e. the Metropolitan Railway Metropolitan Railway Company
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). Lamenting the absence of promised testimonials to the efficacy of the lozenges, presents two specimen testimonials, one from a theatrical manager, who has overcome his cautiousness and is now attempting to build a giant auditorium, and from a 'C. H. Sp—N' (a reference to Charles H Spurgeon Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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), who claims that the lozenges helped him treat 'sacred matters in a sportive light'. Punch concludes by insisting that such letters will help give the lozenge a 'world-wide reputation'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 146.

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Question for any Scientific Society

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Societies, Zoology, Animal Development, Descent


    'Can a Lobster Rise Above its Sauce?'.



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Issue 1135 (11 April 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 147.

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Parliamentary Notices

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Military Technology, Manufactories, Industry, Pollution


Punch,  44 (1863), 149.

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Curious Fact in Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Natural History, Zoology, Comparative Philology, Animal Behaviour


    Claims that the sea-horse, a species 'long denied' by naturalists, can be found in numbers on English coasts 'having been tamed by the breakers on the shore'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 153.

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An Ingoldsby Legend in Prose (To CARDINAL WISEMAN)

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Drollery

Subjects:

Supernaturalism, Spiritualism, Miracle


    Draws Nicholas P S Wiseman's Wiseman, Nicholas Patrick Stephen (1802–65) ODNB
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attention to a report in Liguori 1833 Liguori, Alfonso Maria de' 1833. The Glories of Mary, Mother of God, Dublin: John Coyne
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of a woman whose head was cut off by two jealous lovers but which allegedly spoke to St Dominic Dominic, Saint (c. 1170–1221) CBD
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some time afterwards. Considers this event greater than any 'incident in the life of MR. HOME Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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' (a reference to Home 1863 Home, Daniel Dunglas 1863. Incidents in My Life, London : Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green
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), and suggests that such a story be sent to the Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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.



Punch,  44 (1863), 153.

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Our National and Domestic Defenders

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Agriculture, Chemistry


    Praises William G Armstrong Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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and Harper Twelvetrees Twelvetrees, Harper (1823–81) WBI
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for their respective inventions: Armstrong for his 'great guns' whose 'large bolts and big bombs' can 'drive / In the sides' of the best invading ships and defend England against 'Yankees, the Russian, and French'; and Twelvetrees for his 'deadly paste' for destroying insects that 'invade our provisions'.



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Issue 1136 (18 April 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 157.

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Punch and the Punsters

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Vaccination, Heroism

People mentioned:

Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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Punch,  44 (1863), 159.

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At Home with the Spirits (By a Competent and Candid Observer)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Supernaturalism, Miracle, Observation, Charlatanry, Imposture


    This long poem details the narrator's experiences at a spiritualist séance. He begins by describing the 'still and solemn ring' of people around a table, people who 'were not of the sceptics. / Who scorn on mysteries fling', and notes the presence of the apparently reliable medium, whose name he does not reveal through fear that the séance will be called 'a sell'. Proceeds to describe the dim lighting in the room, without which 'the spirits kept aloof', the participant's anticipation of spirits and their memories of supernatural phenomena, and finally the sudden raps heard around the séance room. The spirits confirm their existence and later, 'At the medium's command', they manifest a moving white hand which participants identify as belonging to different deceased relatives. Noting how an accordion played and moved about under a table, the author insists that this was not a 'trickster's game', which the medium sought to prove by asking for the shutters to be opened. Later, the medium is seen floating near the ceiling, a similar feat having been performed by Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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. Some participants agree that the medium must have been floating and later note how the 'spirits' let him fall back into his chair. The author then reflects on his experiences, wondering if he should 'misdoubt my senses' because of the absurdity of the phenomena, asking whether 'candid souls remain, / Still crushed beneath the burden / Of bigot's reason chain', and insisting that what is vouched for by William Howitt Howitt, William (1792–1879) ODNB
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, Samuel C Hall Hall, Samuel Carter (1800–89) ODNB
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, and Edward G E L B Lytton Lytton, Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-, 1st Baron Lytton (1803–73) ODNB
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'Is surely proved for all—though BREWSTER Brewster, Sir David (1781–1868) DSB ODNB
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be uncandid— / And FARADAY Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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be small'. Concludes by noting that despite the secrecy of these 'modern miracles' and their witnesses 'The eye of faith is single; / The throat of faith is wide!'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 163.

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A Song from the Quaker City

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery; Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Religion, War, Nationalism, Politics, Cultural Geography

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Discusses a 'popular naval ballad' sung in Philadelphia, the 'City of the Society of Friends'. The ballad asks for 'a Navy of Iron' with which to 'conquer the world's broad ocean'. Less becoming of the 'Doves of Colombia' is the ballad's boast, 'Then adieu to Britannia's power, / We'll crush it whenever we please', and its claim that John Bull will be punished 'at his door' with a 'Navy of Iron' because he gloated in hope that the American union would dissolve. The ballad ends with a boast about the unprecedented strength of the American 'Iron Jacks' and the likelihood that they will sweep away the 'despots of Europe'. Punch is baffled by the fact that the ballad anticipates destroying the American ironclad Merrimac Merrimac, ship
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(suggesting that he is not a 'genuine Yankee'), and retaliates with its own ballad. In this, Punch boasts that 'Our Armstrongs Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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will crack' the American 'Knavy of Iron-clads' like 'fleas', reminds 'You Yankees' of the revolt that has 'come home to your door', and agrees with the first ballad that it should sweep from its seas and harbours all Alabamas CSS Alabama
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and Merrimac, the very ironclads with which America seeks to defeat England.



Punch,  44 (1863), 164.

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Small-Bird Murder

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Hunting, Cruelty, Collecting, Ornithology


    Shows three members of the West Sussex '"Shipley Sparrow Club" Shipley Sparrow Club, West Sussex
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, who received prizes' for killing thousands of sparrows and other birds. The three figures, two men and a woman, are somewhat shabbily dressed, one of the men carrying a large bird cage on his back, and the woman carrying a box marked 'Salt'.


See also:

The Times, 14 March 1863, p. 7f


Punch,  44 (1863), 164–65.

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My Lords at Sheffield

Anon

Genre:

Diary, Spoof

Subjects:

Manufactories, Industry, War, Military Technology, Metallurgy, Education, Periodicals, Display

People mentioned:

John Percy Percy, John (1817–89) ODNB
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    Following the Mayor of Sheffield John Brown's Brown, Sir John (1816–96) ODNB
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invitation to the lords of the Admiralty Admiralty
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and 'a great lot of scientific Swells' to see how the 'armour for our ships of war' is made at his 'enormous' Atlas Works Atlas Works, Sheffield
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, relates the observations of Mr Punch, who joined the party. On reaching the works, Mr Punch saw 'several miles of vast buildings, filled with machinery colossal enough to have delighted GARGANTUA', and came across the other visitors to the works where 'Wheels were growling, fires were roaring, chains were clanking, [and] beams were banging'. (164) Mr Punch then asked Edward A S Seymour (12th Duke of Somerset) St Maur [formerly Seymour], Edward Adolphus, 12th Duke of Somerset (1804–85) ODNB
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to explain the processes involved, but soon saw one of the burning hot slabs of iron being taken from the 'vast furnace' and then hurried into the 'jaws of the rolling machine', a process causing a 'volcano' to erupt. This reminded Mr Punch of the way he had 'dealt with, improved, and educated the public mind for the last twenty years'. Having praised the mayor for the spectacle, Mr Punch heard John Brown explain how the plates were trimmed and finished on 'self-acting tables, and then saw the plates whisked away in railway carts to Chatham Dockyard Chatham Dockyard
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and Woolwich Dockyard Royal Navy—Woolwich Dockyard
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. He told Brown that he considered the cost to the nation for these plates was a 'trifle', given that they would 'make war as impossible as anything in this mad world can be'. He was then invited to see the Bessemer Bessemer, Sir Henry (1813–98) DSB ODNB
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process. (165)



Punch,  44 (1863), 165.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism


Punch,  44 (1863), 166.

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Photographic Passports

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Photography, Representation


    Argues that photographs should replace 'Pen and ink descriptions' on passports because they 'give a far more faithful picture', which might 'more easily be recognised than any written catalogue of one's features, age, and height'. Points out that one disadvantage is that those men who forget to shave would need to have themselves 're-photographed a dozen times a month'.



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Issue 1137 (25 April 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 167–68.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Observatories, Astronomy, Railways, Pollution, Light, Electricity, Technology, Government


    While noting a House of Lords House of Lords
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committee's imminent consideration of new London railway bills, announces news that astronomers at Royal Observatory, Greenwich Royal Observatory, Greenwich
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, have warned that 'their telescopes will be shaken' by introducing railways into Greenwich Park (167). Later notes a parliamentary conversazione at which 'Harbours of Refuge, Sewage, and Electric Light' were discussed.



Punch,  44 (1863), 169.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Microscopy, Lecturing, Aeronautics


Punch,  44 (1863), 173.

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Mr Cox's Contribution to Science

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Aeronautics, Measurement, Politics


    Reports that James Glaisher Glaisher, James (1809–1903) DSB
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has requested 'gentlemen' to record the altitude and azimuth of his imminent balloon ascent, and that the statesman William Cox Cox, William (1817–89) Stenton 1976
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claimed that he thought the balloon was upright but that its azimuth had 'fallen off'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 174.

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The 'Home' Circuit

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Charlatanry


    Playing on the name of the medium Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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, the '"Home" circuit' is defined as 'A Spiritualist circle of folly and deception, at which lies are rapped out by the dozen all round'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 174.

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The Vulgarest of all Vulgar Fractions

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics


    'Breaking the Peace'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 174–75.

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The Naggletons and the Bishop

Anon

Genre:

Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Spiritualism, Pollution, Sanitation

People mentioned:

Daniel H Tuke, Tuke, Daniel Hack (1827–95) ODNB
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Harper Twelvetrees Twelvetrees, Harper (1823–81) WBI
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Punch,  44 (1863), 175.

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The Ugliest Sight in Europe

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Environmentalism, Politics, Government


    Discusses an article in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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reporting the protest made to the government by inhabitants of Ludgate Hill against the construction of a bridge by the London, Dover, and Chatham Railway Company London, Chatham, and Dover Railway Company
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in front of St Paul's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral
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. Urges that an act of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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should be used to stop this proposal. Observes: 'Parliament, [acting] in the interest of railway companies, perpetually sanctions the violation of the most sacred rights of individuals for the benefit of the public. It might just as well, and a great deal better, gratify the public at the expense of a railway company'. Expects the bridge to be an 'eyesore' and 'one of the most ridiculous wonders of the world'. Hopes the government can teach the London, Dover, and Chatham Railway not 'surreptitiously to procure any Bill empowering them to perpetrate a monstrous public nuisance'.



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Issue 1138 (2 May 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 183.

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Surprising to a Degree!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Gender, Cultural Geography


    Noting the novelty of seeing a Bachelor of Arts dressed in a bonnet, gown, and crinoline, discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that Emma Chenu Chenu, Emma (fl. 1863) PU1/44/18/1
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had passed her Bachelor of Science examination at the Academie de Lyons Académie de Lyons
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. Anticipates corresponding changes to the rituals of English universities, notably the number of 'Graces' in the senate and the occupation of professorial chairs by women. Suggests a list of possible occupants of such chairs, including the actress Avonia Jones Jones (afterwards Brooke), Avonia Stanhope (1836–67) ODNB
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in botany, and Miss Saunders Saunders, Miss (fl. 1863) PU1/44/18/1
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in astronomy. Concludes by anticipating that even the year's Senior Wrangler, Robert Romer Romer, Sir Robert (1840–1918) ODNB
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, 'will be left nowhere by the fair competitors for this feminine-sounding degree'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 184.

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Great Suburban Railway

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Government, Environmentalism


    Announces the publication of the First Report of the Select Committee on Metropolitan Railway Communication First Report of the Select Committee on Metropolitan Railway Communication: First Report of the Select Committee of the House of Lords on Metropolitan Railway Communication, House of Lords Parliamentary Papers, Session 1863 (500), 8, 1–3
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which supports the numerous railway bills for London. Ironically endorses the 'gigantic undertaking' of a 'Barnes, Hammersmith, and Kensington Line', arguing that the railway will unite several prosperous and closely separated areas, and will disturb the peace of Barnes Common, replace dull houses by 'lively stuccoed villas', and lead to a bridge being built over the Thames, which will further 'intercept' the view of London.



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Issue 1139 (9 May 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 188.

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Fresh Fact for the Faculty

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Disease


    Reports that a 'Medical Man' has linked the 'sour disposition' of one of his patients to the fact that the latter had recently 'turned in bed'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 188.

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Proper Degree for a Parisian Surgeon

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Surgery, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Language


    A 'Doctor of the Saw bone'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 188.

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Experiments at Woolwich

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Military Technology, War

People mentioned:

Joseph Whitworth Whitworth, Sir Joseph, 1st Baronet (1803–87) ODNB
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Punch,  44 (1863), 188.

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Geographical

Anon

Genre:

Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Language

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Geographical Society Royal Geographical Society
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Punch,  44 (1863), 190.

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Solar Science

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Extra-Terrestrial Life, Observation


    Noting the claim of astronomers that 'there may possibly be men in the moon', reports that 'we were scarcely prepared for the astounding announcement that three men were actually seen walking in the sun'. Insists that John R Hind Hind, John Russell (1823–95) DSB
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should have reported this before.



Punch,  44 (1863), 193.

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Prospectus of a New Journal

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Periodicals, Reading, Psychology, Disease, Photography, Narcotics


    Insisting that 'a new Journal is one of the necessities of the age', the 'Proprietors of the Journal' announce the publication of 'The Sensation Times, AND CHRONICLE OF EXCITEMENT', and proceed to puff the gruesome topics to be covered in its pages. Amongst its 'objects' are 'Causing the Hair to Stand on End' and 'Giving Shocks to the Nervous System', while it seeks to improve its reportage of murdered victims with 'the aid of photography', including such classes of 'sensational record' as 'Revolting Cruelty to Animals', and having the best exponents of 'Arsenical Literature', including 'all Poison Cases'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 193.

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Anecdotes of Animals

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Education, Crime


    Presents information sent in by a correspondent describing his experiences 'training all sorts of animals'. Notes the difficulty of training and the 'untidy' habits of the 'Chicken-Hazard', but considers the dingo and wallaby and other 'animals of the Bush' to be so easily educated that the wallaby has been giving 'readings from SHAKESPEARE Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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', reading poetry, and also forging signatures.



Punch,  44 (1863), 194.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Meteorology, Instruments


    Claims that 'A Railway Tunnel 2000 feet in circumference is to be erected on the site of the Great Turnstile, Holborn' and that Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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'will give several Readings of the Barometer'.



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Issue 1140 (16 May 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 197.

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Somes's Threatened Sunday

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Religion, Botanical Gardens


Punch,  44 (1863), 197.

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Ornithological Query

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Taxonomy


    Unable to determine the species of 'Round Robin', responds to one correspondent's question by telling him that the 'Female Partridge' belongs to the species 'Ma'-tridge'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 198–99.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Hospitals, Patronage, Vaccination, Medical Treatment, Invention, Commerce, Quackery


    Notes the debate following William E Gladstone's Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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budget speech, in which the Chancellor of the Exchequer discussed the sorry state of charities and accused hospitals of being 'mismanaged'. Points out that the St Bartholomew's Hospital St Bartholomew's Hospital
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'trustees eat [the cost of treating] 150 patients at one luxurious dinner' (198). Later notes a discussion of the Vaccination Bill for Ireland, and suggests that 'Everybody is being vaccinated just now'. Thinks that it is sufficiently fashionable that an enterprising jeweller could make 'a Vaccination Bracelet, with a cow on it', an item that would sell particularly well if it were 'electrified, or fumigated, or magnetised, or blessed by the Pope Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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, or quackified in some way'. (199)



Punch,  44 (1863), 199.

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Surgery in the City of London

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Engineering, Environmentalism, Surgery, Hospitals


    Considers the London, Chatham, and Dover Railway Company's London, Chatham, and Dover Railway Company
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proposed bridge over Ludgate Hill will be 'a greater eyesore than any case in the Ophthalmic Hospital Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital
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'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 203.

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A Patent Medicine for Small-Pox

Rotundus Rotundus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Quackery, Commerce, Medical Treatment, Vaccination, Disease, Health, Human Development, Crime, Government


    The letter-writer relates that he observed a 'large bill' in a shop selling James Morison's Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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'Quack Medicines' which asserted the 'FATAL CONSEQUENCES' of vaccination, and which linked the supporters of vaccination with avaricious and evil medical practitioners. The bill also listed the opponents of vaccination, who included a Dr Zimple Zimple, Dr (fl. 1863) PU1/44/20/5
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, whom the narrator suspects is a yokel hailing from a place whose inhabitants believed that vaccination leads to 'horns sprouting on human heads'. Describes how the shopkeeper took the narrator to be one such 'zimpleton' or rustic fool and gave him a copy of the Hygeist Hygeist (1842–67) Waterloo Directory
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. Asks whether the government will allow such shops to incite people to disobey the law and, 'to the destruction or disfigurement of their unhappy children', use Morison's pills instead of vaccination. Notes that this quack remedy will boost the undertakers' trade, owing to the recent outbreak of small-pox.



Punch,  44 (1863), 204–05.

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Giving us Pepper

Peter Pepper Pepper, Peter
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof; Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Amusement, Display, Supernaturalism, Light, Instruments, Class


    Introducing himself as John H Pepper's Pepper, John Henry (1821–1900) ODNB
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assistant, explains that this 'learned and scientific gentleman has permitted his Ghost to appear at one of the suburban theatres' and expresses delight at the fact that the illusion is terrifying audiences 'whose notions of the supernatural are thereby realised to the full'. On this basis, he explains that he visited the theatre in person to witness the audience's 'notions of the supernatural'. (204) He then presents a report of the drama in the form of a scene from the play itself. The drama reveals the vulgar behaviour of the audience who consist of women noisily singing to their children and people who do not appear to treat the ghostly performer with much respect. The narrator denies that this is the proper way to treat a ghost and suggests that Pepper should appear in a production of Richard Wagner's Wagner, (Wilhelm) Richard (1813–83) CBD
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opera The Flying Dutchman.



Punch,  44 (1863), 205.

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Shakespearian Juveniles

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Supernaturalism, Imposture, Charlatanry, Amusement


    Identifies Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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as the younger brother of 'Antonio', who allegedly inspired a character of the same name and similar criminal characteristics in William Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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Tempest. Offers a spoof extract from Home's autobiography (Home 1863 Home, Daniel Dunglas 1863. Incidents in My Life, London : Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green
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) which contains many references to people possessing the same names as those in Shakespeare's play. The author describes his early passion for conjuring, his apprenticeship to 'an amiable Magician', his learning of card tricks, his creation of much 'floating capital' out of his ability to be 'wafted through the atmosphere by unseen agencies, and his appearance as a ghost to the 'late Duke of Milan'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 205.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Geology, Railways, Engineering, Zoological Gardens, Animal Behaviour


    Includes the news that Roderick I Murchison Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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is to 'geologically survey himself in the looking glass: he has been heard to express a wish that his nose was strata [i.e. straighter]'. States that medical men report there to be many 'cases of cigars' in London. Reports the delayed opening of the 'Underground Railway over the Straits of Dover', the discontinuation of 'Salmon Ladders' owing to the salmon's relationship with a minnow, and the release of animals from the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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during the annual carnival in Regent's Park.



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Issue 1141 (23 May 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 207.

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Scholars in the Army

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

War, Education, Philosophy, Human Development, Mathematics


    Discusses news that the Horse Guards Army—Commander-in-Chief's Office (Horse Guards)
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have ruled that candidates for direct commissions in the Army Army
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must pass examinations in a range of academic subjects, including mathematics and the sciences. Warns, however, that military courage and intellectual acumen are not identical, suggesting that 'the stupider man will be the braver'. Goes on to warn 'your Honours' that while a candidate who has studied the sciences 'has learned to forecast the effects of causes', he should not be 'too keenly alive' to such causes, since this knowledge might check 'intrepidity in the cannon's mouth'. Suggests the need to maintain 'a Blockheads' Brigade, and a large Division of Dunces'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 209.

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Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Zoology, Breeding


Punch,  44 (1863), 209.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Pneumatics, Publishing, Railways, Societies, Palaeontology, Race


    Includes the news that 'An Illustrated Treatise on Dancing Pumps will shortly be issued from the hydraulic press', that a 'comic edition' of Bradshaw's Monthly Railway Guide Bradshaw's Monthly Railway Guide (1841–1900+) ODNB, s.v. Bradshaw, George
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will be published with incorrect timetables and maps—thus resembling the original—and that Mr Mitchell Mitchell, Mr (fl. 1863) PU1/44/21/3
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is to be made a fellow of the Geological Society Geological Society of London
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, owing to his discovery of 'the Original Bones of the Niggers'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 213.

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Science for Schools

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Education, Light, Lecturing, Science Communication


    Introduces a spoof lecture given to a class of rowdy school children by 'Professor Petgoose' on 'the THEORIES OF LIGHT'. The apparently verbatim transcript of what was said during the lecture reveals the lecturer's repeated attempts to be heard above the noice of his class, his subjection to peas fired from peashooters, and his troubled attempts to show that light makes distinct everything in reach of its rays.



Punch,  44 (1863), 214.

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Coining Diseases

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Commerce


    Discusses a report in the Austrian Gazette Austrian Gazette (cited 1863) PU1/44/21/5
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of a case of small-pox communicated by some bank-notes owned by a female victim of the disease. Believes this confirms perceptions of the 'unhealthy condition' of the Austrian 'financial system' and fears about Austrian bank-notes.



Punch,  44 (1863), 216.

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Correspondence

Luce Long U Long, Luce
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J Stewat Meals U Stewat Meals, J
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Sweet Swilliam U Swilliam, Sweet
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Amusement, Light, Supernaturalism, Magic, Imposture


    Three correspondents discuss 'that wonderful Illusion, the Spectre Drama, at the Polytechnic Royal Polytechnic Institution
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'—a reference to John H Pepper's Pepper, John Henry (1821–1900) ODNB
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'Ghost' illusion. Luce Long and J Stewat Meals claim they know how the illusion is produced, while Sweet Swilliam claims he has 'tried the Ghost' of 'Dircke' (a reference to the co-inventor of the illusion, Henry Dircks Dircks, Henry (1806–73) ODNB
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) and suggests that it should be used in a production of William Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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Macbeth.



Punch,  44 (1863), 216.

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Mathematical Problem (For the New Army Examinations)

Anon

Genre:

Exam Paper, Spoof

Subjects:

Mathematics, Amusement


    The problem is to work out the 'height of the Season' from the 'relative heights of St. Paul's St Paul's Cathedral
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and Monument'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 216.

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Idiotic Signatures

Anon

Genre:

Reminiscences, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Menageries

People mentioned:

Philip L Sclater Sclater, Philip Lutley (1829–1913) DSB
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Issue 1142 (30 May 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 217.

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Wisdom in Globules

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Universities


    Following news of a proposal to introduce 'homeopathic chairs' into Belgian universities, predicts the minute size of such chairs and points out that 'Everything else would have to be reduced in equal proportion' until the wisdom acquired at the universities becomes so small that nobody will want it. Adds that many of the author's 'medical friends' will be pleased to hear that the 'chairs' (proposals) were not 'carried'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 217.

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Advice to Parents

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Psychology, Human Development


    Given that a 'child's mind is nothing better than a sheet of paper', then 'its address in after-life will depend entirely upon the way in which you direct it'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 219.

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Signatures by Sunlight

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Photography, Physiognomy


    Noting the way in which people are now signing their letters by sticking tiny photographs of themselves onto the paper, suggests that letters should be accompanied by photographs of people indicating their frame of mind when writing. Presents examples of male writers showing their states of apology, condolence, and anger.



Punch,  44 (1863), 219.

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The Source of the Nile Discovered

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Discovery, Heroism, Nationalism, Comparative Philology


    Praises John H Speke Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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and James A Grant Grant, James Augustus (1827–92) ODNB
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for tracing the source of the Nile, a feat which it considers to be the solution to 'the mystery of ages' that has defeated 'successive sages' and Egyptian rulers from the ancient King Cheops Cheops, King of Memphis (26th century BC) CBD
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down to the current Viceroy Sa'id Pasha Sa'id Pasha, Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt (1822–63) CBD
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. Notes Egyptians' delight with the news of the source of their 'sacred stream' and praises the explorer Charles T Beke Beke, Charles Tilstone (1800–74) ODNB
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for showing them 'the way they were to go'. Ends by anticipating that Egypt, much as she used to adore 'the bull and cow', will now worship John Bull, as well as Speke and Grant.



Punch,  44 (1863), 219.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Archaeology, Botany, Religious Authority, Human Development, Descent


    Includes news that 'an eminent Housebreaker' has found some coins that would interest archaeologists, that 'The Indian Overland Root will be shown at the next Botanical Fête', and that Charles H Spurgeon Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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will lecture for three consecutive hours, in order to prove that the human jaw is 'just as great now-a-days as the one found at Abbeville, supposed to be pre-Adamite'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 220.

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Prevention Better than Cure

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Disease, Vaccination, Transport


    Shows an old lady and other members of her family about to step into a four-wheel cab. The old lady expresses her fears about smallpox (a reference to claims that cabs carried such disease), but the 'Cabby' reassures her that he had the rear wheel of the cab vaccinated.



Punch,  44 (1863), 224–25.

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The Great Jaw of Moulin-Quignon

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Anatomy, Archaeology, Human Development, Ethnology, Palaeontology, Religion, Comparative Philology, Evolution, Charlatanry, Controversy, Periodicals


    Begins by referring the reader to various 'letters, papers, inquiries, and comptes-rendus' by Jean L A de Quatrefages de Bréau Quatrefages de Bréau, Jean-Louis-Armand de (1810–92) DSB
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, Henri Milne-Edwards Milne-Edwards, Henri (1800–85) DSB
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, Hugh Falconer Falconer, Hugh (1808–65) DSB
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, Joseph Prestwich Prestwich, Sir Joseph (1812–96) DSB
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, and William B Carpenter Carpenter, William Benjamin (1813–85) DSB
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. The article refers to recent claims that evidence of the jaw (containing a single tooth) of an antediluvian man had been found in a gravel pit at Moulin-Quignon (Abbeville). The poem upholds the jawbone as the most 'famous' since 'that famed jaw-bone' on which Sampson 'hung an ass's head' (a reference to Judges 15:15), but one that 'wagged beside the Mastodon'. Considers the types of meat that it must have consumed and wonders if it 'Chattered or ached' 'in Glacial time' or when the 'Welsh antediluvians friz / Amidst perennial snows'. Wonders what the owner of the jaw could have revealed about his landscape, including the 'things he ate', 'How he went clad', and the 'queer molluscs Pleiocene, / Or huge Crustaceans Meiocene'. Proceeds to note how the jaw has baffled the 'calculating mind' and geologists 'can still bid [the jaw] fall / To doubt about its drift', but that even if two jaws had been found and could speak, it would show 'how little 'tis we know, / In spite of all that's bragged'. Anticipates how the jaw might 'settle' 'controversies' and give both Thomas H Huxley Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825–95) DSB
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and Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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'a smashing'. The jaw of 'homo primogenitus', in Punch's opinion, is 'strong' in 'wisdom' despite its 'golden' silence, but it 'can'st not even wag' its 'authenticity' and may be a 'bit of pseudo-anthropology, / Made [...] to sell'. (224) Explains this cynicism by appealing to the 'wide [...] imposition' and food adulteration of the day that is so unsatisfactory that 'We've taken to forging man!'. Accordingly, surmises that the jaw might be a 'recent bone' from a 'pauper's grave', but nonetheless reflects on its ability to 'raise quarrels'. (225)



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Issue 1143 (6 June 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 227.

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A Peep into Petland

Tabitha Poosey U Poosey, Tabitha
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Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Education, Domestic Economy


    The introduction explains that Glimpses into Petland Wood, John George 1863. Glimpses into Petland, London: Bell & Daldy
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has 'put the little pets into a great passion' because it appears to have misrepresented them. Noting the 'numerous letters' received from irate pets, Punch publishes one from Tabitha Poosey, a 'Tabby' from 'Petland', who accuses John G Wood Wood, John George (1827–89) ODNB
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of not being able to 'interpret our language', and objects to being called such ridiculous names as 'Tiddlemus'. She also denies claims that 'while we are being stroked we suddenly put out our claws and scratch our best friend'—because they expect the same 'pleasurable sensation' to result when they scratch humans—and insists that cats live in a false state of harmony with other pets.



Punch,  44 (1863), 229.

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Social Catechism

Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Drollery

Subjects:

Amusement, Zoological Gardens

Institutions mentioned:

Zoological Society—Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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Punch,  44 (1863), 232.

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The Nile Song

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Discovery, Nationalism, Comparative Philology, Travel, Heroism


    The subtitle explains that the song was sung at a meeting of the Royal Geographical Society Royal Geographical Society
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'when it was announced that "the Nile was Settled"'. The song opens by hailing John H Speke Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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and James A Grant Grant, James Augustus (1827–92) ODNB
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, whose 'trophy' of the 'Head of the Nile [...] Brightens the name of our Tight Little Isle', and who communicated 'what the Ages have thirsted to know' to Roderick I Murchison Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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and the society. Describes the harsh conditions of their journey, including their 'Perilous tracks' 'Far in the desert-sand', and notes Murchison's reminder that the explorer's 'Line's the Equator'—a reference to the equatorial line on which the source of the Nile (Lake Nyanza) is situated. Goes on to boast about the explorers' observations of Uganda and Kragwè, and the fact that Edward Stanford Stanford, Edward (1827–1904) ODNB
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will have to put the explorers' names on his maps. Ends by calling on the 'buffers' of the society to praise the 'Lake on the Line' and by claiming a lasting reputation for the explorers.



Punch,  44 (1863), [233].

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Britannia Discovering the Source of the Nile

John Tenniel Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Exploration, Discovery, Comparative Philology


    Shows Britannia in the thick of a forest who, on pulling back some branches, discovers 'the source of the Nile'. The latter turns out to be a rather surprised looking Pharoah who, while smoking a pipe, sits near an upturned urn out of which pours a stream of water. Britannia exclaims, 'Aha, Mr. Nilus! So I've found you at last!'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 235.

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University Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Universities

People mentioned:

William Whewell Whewell, William (1794–1866) DSB
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Punch,  44 (1863), 237.

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Zoological

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Zoological Gardens

Institutions mentioned:

Zoological Society—Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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Punch,  44 (1863), 238.

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'A Refractory Telescope'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Light, Instruments, Religion


    Discusses an advertisement by an 'optician of Hebrew name' for a 'Refractory Telescope' that can enable the observer to see such objects as 'Double Stars' and 'the face of a sheep [...] four miles'. Expresses confidence in the value of the instrument, since '"a Jew's eye" was always a phrase for a valuable article, and à fortiori a Jew's telescope must be still better than his eye'. However, questions some of the claimed uses of the instrument. For example, asks if we should pay five pounds to see a double star when we can see 'ALBONI' (this is probably the Italian singer Mariette Alboni Alboni, Marietta (1826–94) Blom 1956
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), and 'hear her too, for a guinea'.



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Issue 1144 (13 June 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 240.

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The Tune the Old Cow Died of

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Veterinary Science, Animal Behaviour, Psychology, Animal Husbandry


    Noting the 'Great mortality' that 'has lately prevailed among the cattle in the mews and suburbs of London', claims that the inquest into the death of one cow revealed that it had died from 'continual irritation' of the nervous system caused by exposure to Italian organ-grinders.



Punch,  44 (1863), 241.

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Ocular Demonstration

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Extinction, Physiology, Human Development, Aesthetics, War, Progress, Futurism


    Responding to a Cornhill Magazine Cornhill Magazine (1860–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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article 'On the Future Extinction of Blue Eyes' (see [George H Lewes], 'On the Future Extinction of Blue Eyes', Cornhill Magazine, 7 (1863), 781–83), thinks this is 'more than enough to alarm any admirer of beauty', but points out that owing to the efforts of the Peace Society Peace Society
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, 'the time is not far off' when the article will be followed by 'On the Future Extinction of Black Eyes'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 241.

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M.P.'s Having Their Air Washed

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Sanitation, Government, Chemistry, Politics


    Discusses remarks made to the House of Commons House of Commons
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by the First Commissioner of Works, William F Cowper Cowper, William Francis, 1st Baron Mount-Temple (1811–88) ODNB
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, who explained how, thanks to the efforts of Goldsworthy Gurney Gurney, Sir Goldsworthy (1793–1875) ODNB
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, the air inside the House is purer—because it is washed in a stream of water—and cooler than the air outside. Reflects on the foul air of London and wonders why Gurney's air purification process is 'not more practised', pointing out that theatres would benefit from this treatment. Questioning whether the scheme 'will wash', hopes Gurney will not prove 'a second Guy Faux' (a reference to Anon, 'The Ventilating Guy Faux', Punch, 11 (1846), 30) and blow up Parliament Houses of Parliament
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. On this basis, suggests that the 'fittest man' to check the air in parliament's cellars would be George B Airy Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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.



Punch,  44 (1863), 241.

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Example for Actors

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Supernaturalism


Punch,  44 (1863), 242.

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Phoebus Apollo's Complaint

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Photography, Technology, Light, Comparative Philology, Commerce, Aesthetics


    Written from the perspective of a hybrid deity, taking its name from both the Greek and Roman gods of the sun, the narrator criticises the tiring uses to which he has been put by the photographic pioneers, William H F Talbot Talbot, William Henry Fox (1800–77) DSB
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and Louis J M Daguerre Daguerre, Louis Jacques Mandé (1789–1851) CBD
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. Complains that, owing to the 'Portrait Painting', 'positives and negatives, collodion and albumen' and the number of professional photographic firms, he has not had a moment to himself. Noting his former status as 'Patron of the fine Arts', resents the grubby, day-long and humiliating practices of photography, and the fact that he can no longer choose his sitters and has to put up with nobodies: hence he grumbles that the world seems to be putting the 'carte before the ass'. Concludes by lamenting the fact that, thanks to photography, he has to rob people's 'privacy' and their 'joys and griefs'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 245.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Commerce, Zoology, Agriculture, Hunting, Government


    Notes that Britain will buy the building housing the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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for £484,000, and hopes that Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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will use it to 'afford space for the Whales and Dowagers'. Later, notes Henry Fenwick's Fenwick, Henry (1820–68) Stenton 1976
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call for 'a Commission of Inquiry into the sea-fisheries, with a view to increase the supply' of the food.



Punch,  44 (1863), 245.

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The King of Prussia's Perfect Cure

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Sanitation


    Discusses a report that the physicians of Emperor Wilhelm I Wilhelm I, Emperor of Germany and King of Prussia (1797–1888) CBD
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of Prussia have advised him to take baths.



Punch,  44 (1863), 247.

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Speke and Grant

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Discovery, Language


    Thinks the discovery of the source of the Nile by John H Speke Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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and James A Grant Grant, James Augustus (1827–92) ODNB
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has 'confuted the old proverb "Ex nihilio nihil fit"—"There's nothing to be made out of the Nile"'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 248.

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Cruelty to a Dumb Creature

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Meteorology, Instruments

People mentioned:

Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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Issue 1145 (20 June 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 249.

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[The Monstrous Photographer]

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Photography, Monstrosities, Zoology


    Shows two photographers standing underneath large shrouds, which cover all but their legs and the insect-like legs of the tripod supporting the camera. The caption plays up the similarity of the figures to strange insects, stating the 'Front and Back view of a very curious Animal that was seen going about loose the other day. It has been named by Dr. Gunther [probably Albert C L G Günther Günther, Albert Charles Lewis Gotthilf (1830–1914) ODNB
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] "Elephans Photographicus"'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 249–50.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Botanical Gardens, Religious Authority, Government


    Notes the debate over the opening of the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh
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, on Sundays after religious services.



Punch,  44 (1863), 252.

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The Prince of Wales's New Livery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Machinery, Gender, Language


    Discussing the obligations to which Prince Edward Edward VII, King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India (1841–1910) ODNB
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pledged on becoming a member of the Merchant Taylors' Company Merchant Taylors' Company
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, notes that the prince is only allowed to take into service 'apprentices duly bound, without fraud or male engine'. Suspects that '"Male engine" may be presumed to mean "evil contrivances"; for engines have no genders, unless screws may be called genders'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 256.

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Will it Wash?

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Commerce, War


    Discusses news of an invention, in America, of 'washable bank-notes' covered with india-rubber. Punch suggests that this might 'tend to an expansion of their credit' and furnish 'a very tempting means of wiping off their liabilities'—a reference to the huge debt incurred during the American Civil War.



Punch,  44 (1863), 256–57.

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Crawley and Lilley

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Cruelty, Human Development, Analogy

Institutions mentioned:

Army Army
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    A response to the trial of Col. Crawley Crawley, Col (fl. 1863) PU1/44/25/5
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, who was charged with cruelty towards Sgt.-Maj. John Lilley Lilley, Sgt.-Maj. John (fl. 1863) PU1/44/25/5
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—behaviour which allegedly led to the death of the latter. This poem likens Crawley to a snake that provokes feelings of disgust. He is represented as 'some slow, slimy, cold, creeping thing, / Big with venom, to wrath slowly wrought', and an 'adder coiled under the stone' with a 'wriggling circuitous coil'. It warns of Crawley's 'quick double tongue in its head, / The gleam of its cold cruel eye, / The foul fetid slave o' spread / The victim 'twill crush by-and-by'.



Punch,  44 (1863), 257.

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Shadows of the Week

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Meteorology, Zoological Gardens, Railways, Aeronautics

People mentioned:

Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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Institutions mentioned:

Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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Punch,  44 (1863), 257.

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Scientific Gastronomy

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Societies, Geology, Nutrition, Language


    Notes the discussion at the Geological Society Geological Society of London
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concerning a geological dish consisting of 'a crust overlying inferior strata and deposits containing reptiles of the Batrachian order'—the 'Toad-in-the Conglomerate'.



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Issue 1146 (27 June 1863)Expand    Contract

Punch,  44 (1863), 262.

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Horticulture

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Horticulture


Punch,  44 (1863), [263].

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Putting a Good Face on It

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Caricature

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Exhibitions, Government, Commerce


    Shows Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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who, dressed in a plasterer's outfit and sitting on some trestles, applies plaster to a small scale model of the International Exhibition International Exhibition (1862), London
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. Closer inspection reveals that the plaster comes from a pile labelled '£484,000', a reference to the amount of public money needed to buy the exhibition building. The caption has Palmerston boasting: 'Lor Bless you! A little bit o' stucco will make it perfect'.



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