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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 57  (July to December 1869)

Punch,  57 (1869), [v]–[viii].

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Introduction

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Public Health, Pollution, Sanitation, Spiritualism, Aeronautics, Cruelty, Animal Husbandry, Error, Periodicals, Utilitarianism, Class, Hospitals, Crime, Medical Treatment, Politics, Government


    Under 'Notes', summarises forthcoming articles on the London sewerage system (Anon, 'London Sewage and Thames Brewage', Punch, 57 (1869), 9, , Anon, 'The London and Barking Bank', Punch, 57 (1869), 25), on Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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and the London Dialectical Society London Dialectical Society
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(, Anon, 'Dialecticschism', Punch, 57 (1869), 25), on cruelty to cattle (, Anon, 'Schools of Humane Science', Punch, 57 (1869), 116, , John Tenniel, '"Am Not I a Brute and a Brother?"', Punch, 57 (1869), [119], , Anon, 'A Thought in Maddox Street', Punch, 57 (1869), 122), on the erroneous prediction of a high tide (, Anon, 'The Tidal Wave', Punch, 57 (1869), 147, , Anon, 'Known Far and Wide', Punch, 57 (1869), 152), on the launch of the Academy Academy (1869–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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(, Anon, 'Floreat!', Punch, 57 (1869), 163), on the inquest into the death of a pauper at the infirmary of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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(, Anon, 'An Instructive Exhibition', Punch, 57 (1869), 251), and on a speech of the 'Severe State Surgeon', the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Robert Lowe Lowe, Robert, 1st Viscount Sherbrooke (1811–92) ODNB
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(, Anon, 'A Severe State Surgeon', Punch, 57 (1869), 261).



Issue 1461 (10 July 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 1–2.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Telegraphy, Pollution, Sanitation, Public Health


    Reports that an announcement was made in the House of Commons House of Commons
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that 'all the Telegraphs had been bought by the Government', and later notes Austen H Layard's Layard, Sir Austen Henry (1817–94) ODNB
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proposal to 'cleanse the Serpentine, at the bottom of which is an abominable mess, the result of years of now discontinued drainage' (2).



Punch,  57 (1869), 5.

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Puffs of the Period

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Pharmaceuticals, Medical Treatment, Quackery, Commerce


    Discusses a Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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advertisement for 'Milk of Cucumbers' (a tonic for 'rendering the skin fair') and 'American Pick-me-up Bitters'. Believes the former utlizes a similar process to that enunciated in Swift 1726 [Swift, Jonathan] 1726. Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, 2 vols, London, B. Motte
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—the cucumbers 'absorbing the solar rays' so as to prevent facial blemishes. Suggests a simple alternative to this treatment and speculates on the intended consumers of both products.



Punch,  57 (1869), 9.

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London Sewage and Thames Brewage

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Public Health


Punch,  57 (1869), 11.

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A Jennerous Suggestion

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Vaccination, Human Development, Disease, Heroism, Education


    Notes that during a recent House of Commons House of Commons
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discussion on royal parks, Edgar A Bowring Bowring, Edgar Alfred (1826–1911) WBI
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lamented the state of statues in Kensington Gardens Kensington Gardens
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, notably those of John H Speke Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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and Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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. Objects to the proposal to move the Jenner statue to Trafalgar Square on the grounds that in Kensington Gardens it can be seen by 'little boys and girls' who 'might be taught [...] to look up to it as the image of their great benefactor, to whom they should remember that they owe that prophylactic against disfigurement and destruction'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 12.

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The Faraday Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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Memorial

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Physics, Natural Philosophy, Discovery, Invention, Instruments, Telegraphy, Electricity, Electromagnetism, Electrochemistry, Magnetism, Force, Chemistry, Light, Navigation, Theory, Nationalism, Cultural Geography


    Upholds the need for Faraday to have a statue; he is a 'Philosopher' who ought to have one 'if anyone ought'. Justifies this argument by claiming that 'Nobody, for a long time, has adorned life with more discoveries ministering to its uses' than Faraday, including such discoveries as 'The manufactures of steel and glass, electro-telegraphy, and the magneto-electric illumination of lighthouses'. Suggests that just as the names of the battles of military heroes are inscribed on their monuments, so Faraday's should be emblazoned with 'Researches, Theory of Induction, Course of Electric Currents, Magneto-Electricity, Diamagnetism, Liquefaction and Solidification of Gases, Conservation of Force, Chemistry of a Candle'. Stresses the importance of the last, likening Faraday himself to a bright candle who illuminated electricity and 'turned magnetism into electricity, and electricity into light'. Notes that France has named a Parisian street after him and notes that Prince Edward Edward VII, King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India (1841–1910) ODNB
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is leading the movement to build a Faraday statue.



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Issue 1462 (17 July 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 13–14.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature—Proceedings, Spoof; Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Religion, Astronomy, Observation, Instruments, Animal Husbandry, Disease


    Provides a fictionalized report, in dialogue form, of the House of Lords House of Lords
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debate on the Disestablishment of the Irish Church Church of Ireland
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Bill. Reports Philip H Stanhope (5th Earl Stanhope) Stanhope, Philip Henry, 5th Earl Stanhope (1805–75) ODNB
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as arguing that the Armagh Observatory Armagh Observatory
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should retain its tithes, a proposal he considers 'in accord with the spirit of the Bill, as the Observatory looks after the Lunatics'. Reports that Frederick T H-T Blackwood (5th Baron Dufferin and Clandeboye) Blackwood, Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava (1826–1902) ODNB
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replied that the bill did not include telescopes but that the Lords would 'take care of them'. Later notes a House of Commons House of Commons
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discussion of the 'Contagious Diseases in Animals Bill', and upholds the need for contagious animals to be kept separate from those that are not.



Punch,  57 (1869), 15.

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Sanitary Garden Parties

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Health, Disease, Class, Sanitation, Human Development, Gender, Patronage


    Noting the usually pleasant nature of garden parties, describes 'parties which are still more pleasant things', namely those where poor children are allowed to play and enjoy the fresh air. Notes that during the previous eight summers 'one Society' has made this possible for 'some thousands of poor children' at less than a 'half-penny a head'. Stresses how 'great a pleasure may be given with a very little money' and praises the Ladies' Sanitary Association Ladies' National Association for the Diffusion of Sanitary Knowledge
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for enabling this to happen. Concludes by inviting financial donations to the association.



Punch,  57 (1869), 16.

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[Private Rickshaw at the Wimbledon Shooting Contest]

C K Keene, Charles Samuel (1823–91) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [8]

Illustrators:

C K Keene, Charles Samuel (1823–91) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Military Technology


    Depicts the attempt of Private Rickshaw to win a medal at the annual rifle shooting contest held at Wimbledon Camp Wimbledon Camp
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.



Punch,  57 (1869), [17].

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The Changeling

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Gender, Politics, Government, Religion, Religious Authorities


    This illustration shows Nurse Canterbury (the Archbishop of Canterbury, Archibald C Tait Tait, Archibald Campbell (1811–82) ODNB
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) presenting a baby, labelled 'Irish Church Church of Ireland
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Bill', to Mrs Prime Minister and her assistant (William E Gladstone Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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and John Bright Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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respectively). The nurse explains that she has taken 'the greatest care of 'im' and hopes they will 'think 'im grow'd'. Mrs Prime Minister denies that the child is hers or looks like her. This plays on the fact that Tait had amended Gladstone's original Irish Church Disestablishment Bill (which had been rejected by the House of Lords House of Lords
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and Tait himself in 1868) in order to make it more acceptable to the Irish clergy and to both Liberals and Tories.



Punch,  57 (1869), 19–20.

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More Happy Thoughts  [4/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

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[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Sanitation, Engineering


    A spoof diary that is a sequel to the 'Happy Thoughts' which began with [Francis C Burnand], 'Happy Thoughts (Collected in Happy Hours: Including Some Instructive Facts in Natural History, and Other Domestic and Rural Information)', Punch, 50 (1866), 265.


Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
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Punch,  57 (1869), 20.

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The Song of the Passée Belle

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Gender, Medical Treatment, Disease


    Shows a somewhat distraught-looking woman playing a piano and singing a song that refers to the toxic substances she has applied to her body (notably 'Bismuthive Cream' on her brow and 'Belladonna' in her eye) in order to make her more attractive to a suitor.



Punch,  57 (1869), 20.

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Dr. Gladstone Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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(An Irish Melody)

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment


    Likening Gladstone to a medical practitioner, this song describes the reactions of the Irish 'Orange Boys' savouring the prospect of reconstructing the Church of Ireland Church of Ireland
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after it has been disestablished and thus 'released from State control'. They praise Dr Gladstone for his 'pills' which excel 'All the pills / For Ireland's ills'. Stresses that the disestablishment of the Church means that it is no longer a perpetual blister. Describes the ways in which they will now banish various religious groups from Ireland (including 'Each heretic, / And all free-thinkers', and 'Ritualists'), and concludes by praising 'gentle surgeon, DOCTOR GLADSTONE', for creating religious 'Free Trade' and thus the conditions for reconciling the Irish.



Punch,  57 (1869), 21.

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Bumble's Medicine and Surgery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Spiritualism, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Heterodoxy, Vaccination, Utilitarianism, Class, Quackery


    Begins by identifying spiritualists as 'Persons of education, out of Colney Hatch [Asylum] Colney Hatch Asylum
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'. Recounts that a surgeon recalled that 'in the early days of vaccination', some people swore that people who had been vaccinated had developed 'cowhorns' on their heads. Suggests that there are some 'very sensible' people who might believe this claim, and identifies two such individuals from a recent report in the British Medical Journal British Medical Journal (1857–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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. Presents an extract from the periodical which describes how two guardians of the Croydon Poor Law Union Croydon Poor Law Union
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refused to vaccinate workhouse children because they believed this caused the 'itch' associated with small pox. Points out that the symptoms of the disease, however, occur 'in a great many Workhouses'. Ironically suggests that since the Guardians are 'wise men [...] their idea of the consequence of vaccination is to be respected'. Proceeds to a second extract describing the ineptitude of poor-law guardians in medical matters. This concerns the Holyhead Poor Law Union Holyhead Poor Law Union
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, whose guardians objected to the proposal of the medical officer, Mr Walthew Walthew, Mr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/2/8
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, that the dislocated shoulder-bone of a pauper should have been treated months earlier. Considers that the guardians at the Croydon and Holyhead Poor Law Unions are 'Medical Dissenters' in the manner the 'great original advertiser of Universal Medicine', James Morison Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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(this is possibly an ironic reflection on the fact that the poor-law unions clearly did not provide medicine for all). Concludes that while 'Freedom of medical conscience [...] ought to be respected much more than it has been by a too scientific legislature', medical dissenters have often upheld ridiculous claims. Urges ratepayers to decide whether they wish their poor-law unions to be 'directed by Medical Dissenters'.



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Issue 1463 (24 July 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 23–24.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Animal Development, Disease


Punch,  57 (1869), 24.

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Apple-Sauce for the Gun-Club Gun Club
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Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Cruelty, Animal Behaviour, Class


    Responds to the argument that pigeon-shooting is 'not more cruel than game-shooting' and is therefore not objectionable. Agrees that pigeon-shooting is as sportsman-like as game-shooting if the latter means 'battue', and points out that so many other blood sports (including cock-fighting and bear-baiting) are far more cruel than pigeon-shooting even though they are considered acceptable sports. Concludes by suggesting that for these reasons 'the Roughs' have grounds for reviving the old English sport of pigeon-shooting and thus be on par with 'the Swells'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 25.

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Cupid's Cheap Telegrams

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Commerce, Language


    Begins by agreeing with the opinion of The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that the government purchase of telegraph lines will reduce the cost of telegrams and thus diminish the burden of letter writing. Suggests that letter-writing might be altogether superseded by telegrams, with lovers exchanging messages by the 'sixpenny wire' rather than the 'penny post'. Warns that this will also mean a 'condensation' of messages and demonstrates, using a prosaic love-letter recently read in a court at Reading, how letters could be abridged for telegraphic purposes. Discusses how other communications including 'Erotic telegrams' and the 'Germanised telegram' will be worded.



Punch,  57 (1869), 25.

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The London and Barking Bank

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Pollution, Sanitation, Commerce, Agriculture, Chemistry, Nutrition


    Notes William Hope's Hope, William (fl. 1835) WBI
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belief in the potential utility and commercial value of metropolitan sewage. Suggests that the Metropolitan Board of Works Metropolitan Board of Works
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probably shares this belief given its habit of poisoning Barking residents with Thames sewage. Hopes the profit that might result from utilizing sewage will 'prove to be real' and that, 'by the chemistry of nature', that sewage might turn into 'bread, potatoes, and pasture'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 25.

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Dialecticschism

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Societies

People mentioned:

Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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Institutions mentioned:

London Dialectical Society London Dialectical Society
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Punch,  57 (1869), 26.

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The Third Atlantic Cable Laid. (Between Minou, in the Bay of Biscay, and St. Pierre in Newfoundland) July 14, 1869.

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Technology, Electricity, Instruments, Progress, Internationalism, Commerce, War, Morality, Religion


    Begins by reflecting on 'Another tie', or 'Another path of lightning', laid between the Old and New Worlds, and turns to the rapid progress of the cable ship and of the world which so 'spins down the stream of thought and act, / That what was last year's marvel is this year's familiar fact'. Stresses what a 'small thing' it now seems to communicate across the Atlantic 'By the twinkle of a lamp [a possible reference to the mirror galvanometer used in telegraphic signalling], and the quiver of a wire'. Wonders whether the telegraph will aid or hinder 'good' and international harmony, but is confident that the invention will do more than help commerce, and that it has 'conquered' time and space. Concludes by noting that the destinies of men are ruled by a 'mysterious power', and that submarine cables conceal 'The secrets of the future, and the ends of good and ill'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 29.

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What to do With Our Old Wooden Walls

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Military Technology, Education, Human Development, Crime


    Begins by presenting Admiral Punch's question to the Admiralty Admiralty
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board concerning the use 'of keeping afloat a lot of obsolete old hulks at some half-dozen of our dockyards'. Notes that Admiral Punch thinks 'thousands of pounds yearly' would be saved by destroying them, and also suggests that a better use would be as 'Homes for Homeless Children'. Explains that Admiral Punch has reached this conclusion after inspecting the decommissioned HMS Chicester HMS Chichester
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, a ship kept afloat 'by voluntary charity' and which shows how financing floating schools can reduce the number of children who turn to crime, and thus reduce the costs of prisons.



Punch,  57 (1869), 29.

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St. Swithin's Swithun, St. (d. 863) ODNB
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, 1869

Anerley H Norwood Norwood, Anerley H
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Genre:

Diary,

Subjects:

Amusement, Exhibitions, Transport, Photography, Nutrition, Manufactories, Museums, Horticulture, Astronomy, Light, Display


    Describes a trip to the Crystal Palace Crystal Palace
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on St Swithun's day, where the writer's pursuits included riding a velocipede, enjoying the 'Camera Obscura' and draughts of cream soda 'manufactured by a wheel', being introduced to the 'automaton Chess Player' and its 'checkered career', visiting the 'rosary and geraniumry', studying the 'raw material in the Technological Museum', and observing a display of artificial asteroids and of magnesium lights.



Punch,  57 (1869), 29.

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A Noble Marksman

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Cruelty

Publications cited:

Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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Issue 1464 (31 July 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 33–34.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Museums

Institutions mentioned:

South Kensington Museum South Kensington Museum
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British Museum British Museum
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Punch,  57 (1869), 39–40.

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More Happy Thoughts  [6/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Physiognomy, Human Development

Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
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Punch,  57 (1869), 40.

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Spade and Saw v. Rifle and Bayonet

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology


    Discusses a report that the 'Military Authorities' are now having to decide whether to attach spades to the ends of rifles.



Punch,  57 (1869), 42.

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A Real Grievance

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Engineering, Transport, Railways, Amusement


    Notes that the Thames Tunnel Thames Tunnel
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has been 'dis-established' (a topical term at the time of the passage of the Irish Church Church of Ireland
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Disestablishment Bill) and bought by a railway, but complains that this has deprived London of one of its attractions.



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Issue 1465 (7 August 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 46–47.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Representation, Display, Spiritualism, Telegraphy


    Notes a discussion on a Rembrandt Rembrandt (properly Harmensz van Rijn) (1606–69) CBD
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painting in the National Gallery National Gallery
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which prompted James H Harris (3rd Earl of Malmesbury) Harris, James Howard, 3rd Earl of Malmesbury (1807–89) ODNB
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to suggest that 'the only way of assuring oneself as to the origin of an old picture was Spiritualism' (46). Also notes the 'immense majorities' in favour of the Electric Telegraphs Bill.



Punch,  57 (1869), 47.

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See Buffon Buffon, Georges-Louis Leclerc, comte de (1707–88) DSB
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, Cuvier Cuvier, Georges (1769–1832) DSB
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, Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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, &c.

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Zoological Gardens, Zoology, Animal Behaviour


    Points out that 'of all the animals in the Zoological Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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, the lion is the most saving and careful in his habits'. Thinks this explains why the lion 'looks sharply after the denkeeping expenses' incurred by the lioness.



Punch,  57 (1869), 47.

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Similia Similibus

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Nutrition


Punch,  57 (1869), 48.

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The New St. Pancras Guardian

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Health, Disease, Quackery, Morality, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Government


    An attack on the new guardians of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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, condemning them for 'Bringing Local Self-Government into contempt at a most alarming rate' and for threatening to 'bring back the bad old time'. Notes their greed, their use of 'under-paid officers', and their killing of paupers. Points out that the new guardians hold 'All medical men' to be 'humbugs' and consider 'all paupers' ailments feints', while they 'have the sick-wards cleared, double-quick' whatever the cost to patients' lives. They 'soon find a Doctor who'll make short work of paupers and their complaints'. Adds that they refuse to have inquests into paupers' deaths, oppose centralisation, and punish the master of the workhouse who 'splits' on them.



Punch,  57 (1869), 51.

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The Sisters, France and America

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Internationalism


    Begins by noting the decline in number of admirers of originality and then discusses a Journal Officiel Gazette Nationale; ou, le Moniteur Universel (1789–1810) Moniteur Universel (1811–68) Journal Officiel de l'Empire Français (1869–70) Journal Officiel de la République Français (1870–1900+) BUCOP
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article on the French Atlantic telegraph, an article anticipating that the telegraph will improve the friendship between France and the United States.



Punch,  57 (1869), 52.

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My Velocipede!

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Transport, Invention, Animal Behaviour, Machinery


    The author, a velocipede rider, compares himself favourably with a 'man who doth bestride' a 'gallant steed', emphasizing that the velocipede rider does not need to 'stop to bait', pay road tolls, or keep a paddock. Adds that the velocipede, unlike a horse, 'never jibs, never shies', 'runs away', stumbles 'as he flies' or is seized with 'fits of kicking', and that the machine does not need a whip or rein.



Punch,  57 (1869), 53.

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The Magisterial Momus

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Gender, Physiognomy

People mentioned:

Franz J Gall, Gall, Franz Joseph (1758–1828) DSB
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Johann C Spurzheim Spurzheim, Johann Christoph (1776–1832) DSB
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Punch,  57 (1869), 54.

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The Soldier's Side-Companion

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Internationalism, Surgery

Institutions mentioned:

Army Army
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    Begins by describing the new bayonet to be supplied to British soliders, which will allow them to devour animals and cut wood. Presents an extract from a report noting that the new design of bayonet reflects both peaceful and offensive purposes. Punch notes that 'Arms of precision are abolishing hand-to-hand combats' and have 'semi-civilised' the bayonet. Proceeds to wonder whether the 'excessive destructiveness of improved guns' will lead to the 'destruction of war itself', a trend possibly evident in the conversion of bayonets for more 'pacific' purposes. Concludes by suggesting that the new bayonet could be used as a surgical instrument.



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Issue 1466 (14 August 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 56–57.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Politics, Animal Husbandry, Cruelty, Railways, Military Technology


    Notes discussion on the cattle bill, which prevents animals from being starved for longer than thirty hours while confined to railway carts. Notes that Charles J Ellicott Ellicott, Charles John (1819–1905) ODNB
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, Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol, 'pleaded for twelve hours' for the measure, but points out that it would inconvenience the 'railway people'. Later discusses the 'Fortifications Debate'. (56)



Punch,  57 (1869), 57.

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"Dished in the Shell"

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Progress, War

Institutions mentioned:

Admiralty Admiralty
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    Discusses William G Armstrong's Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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'Newcastle address' in which he claimed that guns were superior in strength to armour. Notes Armstrong's suggestion that given the weakness of armour plating, it is best to design ships so that enemy shots pass right through them 'leaving a between-decks full of the death-dealing splinters behind it'. Believes this is an 'old story', insofar as ships' armour has become so thick that the vessels have become difficult to sail and manoeuvre, and concludes by praising Armstrong for reaching a 'common sense conclusion' that Punch 'came to [...] long ago'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 63.

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Strength and Weakness

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Government, Politics


    Responds to news of the radical politician Peter A Taylor's Taylor, Peter Alfred (1819–91) ODNB
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attack on the government's bill for the 'completion of our inchoate dockyard defences'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 64.

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Specimens Not Yet Included in the Collection at Regent's Park Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [8]

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoological Gardens, Monstrosities, Zoology, Animal Development, Music, Instruments, Railways, Transport, Commerce, Palaeontology, Domestic Economy, Comparative Philology


    Similar to George L P B Du Maurier, 'Specimens Not Yet Included in the Collection at Regent's Park', Punch, 56 (1869), 258, this illustration shows a series of strange animals that have developed anatomical features associated with human society. These include 'Mandoline Turtles' (whose necks and undersides have turned into the body of a mandolin), 'The Railway Buffalo (Bos Buffer-Cornutus)' which sports railway buffers for horns, and 'Itchysaurus Attacked by Phleasyosauri', in which a antediluvian reptile (a relative of the ichthyosaurus) is attacked by tiny fleas.



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Issue 1467 (21 August 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 65.

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A Noodle's Note-Book

Anon

Genre:

Travelogue, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners


Punch,  57 (1869), 65.

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Always Happy to Oblige

Anon

Genre:

Editorial Reply, Drollery

Subjects:

Societies, Botany, Spectroscopy, Supernaturalism


    Explains that Punch informed a correspondent that the Ray Society Ray Society
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is 'a Society for Spectrum Analysis' which 'means an association for the investigation of Ghost Stories'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 66–67.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Politics, Religion, Education, Telegraphy, Animal Husbandry


    Notes discussion of the Education (Scotland) Bill, including Lyon Playfair's Playfair, Sir Lyon, 1st Baron Playfair of St Andrews (1818–98) DSB
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view that 'everybody in Scotland wished for a Religious Education', a view that Punch challenges (66). Also notes that Queen Victoria Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and Empress of India (1819–1901) ODNB
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was advised to mention the 'Cattle Act' and the Electric Telegraphs Act in her speech before Parliament Houses of Parliament
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.



Punch,  57 (1869), 68.

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Spirit Cartes de Visite

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Photography, Light, Magnetism, Charlatanry


    Begins by presenting an extract from a Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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article that rebuts Punch's recent criticism of spirit photography. The extract ridicules Punch's dismissal of the possibility of photographing objects that are invisible to the eye, and points out that the '[photographic] plate is more sensitive than the eye', appealing to the 'evidences' of the 'magnetic or odic lights, which BARON REICHENBACH Reichenbach, Karl (or Carl) Ludwig ()1788–1869 DSB
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photographed'. Punch denies that Reichenbach's work supports the possibility of photographing ghosts, and quotes a passage in which Reichenbach states that his researches support the existence of light emanating from magnets. Proceeds to note that the Spiritual Magazine has adopted the argument that, while photographs of séance 'sitters' are produced from 'rays of daylight', those of the ghosts depend on the 'odic light' emitted by the spectre which is 'too faint to affect the eye'. Notes that while 'spirits' insist on darkness in séances, they appear not to need darkness for being photographed. Wonders why spirits can do without darkness given that this is a reasonable condition for a ghost shining by odic light. Concludes that one solution to this apparent contradiction in the conditions for observing spirits is that 'their photography [...] is moonshine'.



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Issue 1468 (28 August 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 76.

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A Discerning Dog

Habitans in Humido Habitans in Humido
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Instinct, Narcotics


    Describes what he considers to be 'an uncommon instance of the "Sagacity in a Dog"'. Explains that he owns a Skye terrier that responds to an unknown rap on the front door with violent barking, and replies to familiar raps with an identifiable subdued barking. The author boasts that he can identify regular callers from the nature of his dog's bark but that one day he made a mistake in interpretation: he thought his dog's bark signified the regular water-carrier when it was a man bringing alcohol from the public house (the dog apparently displayed more hostility to this caller than the water-carrier).



Punch,  57 (1869), 77.

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Stanzas in the Zoological Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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(To the White Bear during the Late Weather)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Zoological Gardens, Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Heat


    Given the recent hot weather, envies the polar bear for being 'polarised at [its] own Pole'. Notes that other bears have a pole which they can climb, but that however hard they might try to ascend the pole 'They'd into bear's grease melt and run / With such an effort this hot day'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 78.

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Social Surgery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Surgery, Instruments, Invention


    Notes that Benjamin W Richardson Richardson, Benjamin Ward (1828–96) DSB
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has 'invented a knife that cuts so fast that nobody can feel it', but points out that this is not original since 'People in society cut each other every day' and do not feel it.



Punch,  57 (1869), 78.

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Poverty of Invention

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Animal Development, Nutrition, Railways, Transport


    Discusses a Standard Standard (1827–60) Evening Standard (1860–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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report on some 'articles, principally metallic, lately found inside of a dead horse'. Notes that owing to the large number of nails found in the horse, some 'offenders' might suggest that the animal might 'have grown into a locomotive, or iron horse'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 81.

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The New Original. By Walker the Younger

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Entomology, Animal Behaviour, Instinct


Punch,  57 (1869), 81.

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The Domestic Missing Link

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Evolution, Race


    Begins by considering the advantages of replacing his 'servant girl' with 'the Missing Link / Which negro binds to monkey'. However, explains that while the anthropoid ape could fulfil this role, the orang-utan, chimpanzee, and gorilla could not. Identifies the 'Missing Link' as a species 'beneath the Sable Moor' and 'Quashee' (a personification of the 'negro' race), but above 'Jocko' (a chimpanzee). Explains the advantages of such an employee: it could ably complete such tasks as cleaning knives and waiting at the table, be able to 'execute our orders' and sustain a 'licking' like a dog, it could be dismissed without the employee being its 'debtor', it would 'Ne'er trouble you for wages', and it would never attract any 'followers' and thus cause complicated 'relations'. Concludes by noting that while 'The nigger is a sort of man', the author wants a slave who will not be made 'a man and a brother' and has sense without a soul 'behind it'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 82.

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[The Many Uses of a Velocipede]

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Transport, Technology, Invention, Domestic Economy, Nutrition


    Shows a man riding a velocipede whose wheels have been adapted to grind coffee and churn butter.



Punch,  57 (1869), 84.

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Punch's Alphabet  [1/2]George L P B Du Maurier, 'Punch's Alphabet', Punch, 57 (1869), 144

Close

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery, Serial

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [6]

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Medical Treatment


    A series of illustrations in which letters of the alphabet are represented by social and professional types. For example, the letter 'D' is represented by a cross-sectional view of street, in which a man walks past a dentist's shop where the dentist stands over an empty chair whilst wielding a huge pair of pliers. The caption reveals that 'D is my dentist. He likes me. He's wont to be always at home when I call—so I don't'.



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Issue 1469 (4 September 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 85.

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A Cure for Railway Cruelty

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Railways, Transport, Accidents, Government, Morality


    Noting how 'Correspondents' are 'continually complaining' of the lateness and dangers of railways, blames accidents on the 'want of common sense' on the part of railway directors. Argues that drastically reducing the number of guards on trains is 'false economy' because it will increase the chance of accidents and thus damages to be paid out by railway firms. Proposes an 'Act of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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' which forbids guards to work long hours and makes directors 'personally liable' for injuries sustained in railway accidents.



Punch,  57 (1869), 85.

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A Dose of Quills

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Language


    Begins with an extract announcing the imminent publication of the 'Report of the Porcupine Expedition' (a possible reference to Carpenter 1869 Carpenter, William Benjamin 1869. 'Preliminary Report of the Scientific Exploration of the Deep-Sea in H.M. Surveying-Vessel "Porcupine"', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 18, 397–492
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). Mistaking the name of the ship on this expedition, HMS Porcupine HMS Porcupine
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, for the animal, questions the need for an expedition in search of porcupines when there are plenty in the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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. Draws attention to one of the scientists on the expedition, William B Carpenter Carpenter, William Benjamin (1813–85) DSB
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, who is searching 'warm and cold areas' of Stornoway. Punch questions whether porcupines are found in such warm and cold areas as kitchens.



Punch,  57 (1869), 87.

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No More Morphia

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Government, Politics, Commerce, Medical Treatment, Narcotics

Institutions mentioned:

Houses of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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    Notes that a 'Medical Correspondent' of The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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has warned of the soporific effects of 'the gold currency' on parliamentary sessions. Considers the correspondent's views on gold currency, sleep, and narcotics to be 'extraordinary', and wonders whether he would 'administer opium or hyoscyamus' in cases of coma or tendency to somnolence.



Punch,  57 (1869), 91.

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Beats Spiritualism

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Societies, Geology, Spiritualism


    Begins with an extract from a report on the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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meeting at Exeter announcing that John Phillips Phillips, John (1800–74) DSB
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will 'deliver a discourse on Vesuvius'. Playing on the word 'on', considers it 'impossible' that Phillips could be in Exeter and Vesuvius, unless 'he has the power of being in two places at once. Suggests that this 'singular phenomenon' might be mentioned by the next association president, Thomas H Huxley Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825–95) DSB
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, and congratulates Huxley for being elected to this position.



Punch,  57 (1869), 91.

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The Analogue of the Oidium

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Agriculture, Disease, Temperance, Medical Treatment


    Discusses a report describing the effectiveness of sulphur in curbing vine disease in the provinces of Lisbon, suggesting that 'anti-liquor Leagues' should award prizes to the 'duffer' who disgusts people with wine by identifying 'the vine disease with a human malady wherein sulphur is a specific'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 92.

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Naval Inconstancy

Tom Trunnion Trunnion, Tom
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Gender, Nationalism


    Written from the perspective of a somewhat illiterate sailor, this discusses the decision of the lords of the Admiralty Admiralty
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to reject the HMS Favourite HMS Favourite
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(a screw armour-plated corvette) in favour of the HMS Inconstant HMS Inconstant
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. Comparing the vessels to female dancing partners, the author notes that the Inconstant 'is a lively young craft' with a 'thin waist', and is not surprised that the lords of the Admiralty preferred it. Proceeds to discuss the coal-powered 'Revolvers', and believes 'smoke jacks' will revolutionise 'marrytime warfare' as much as the 'Spinning Jenny' has revolutionised cloth production. In a postscript he anticipates that Britannia will rule the waves with a 'rod of iron' rather than her 'black-lead pencil'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 93.

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Signalmen and Scapegoats

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents


Punch,  57 (1869), 93.

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Occasional Sonnets

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Serial

Subjects:

Societies, Geology, Palaeontology, Astronomy, Agriculture, Political Economy, Ethnology, Human Development, Botany, Ornithology, Anatomy, Physiology


    Sonnet ten, 'Exeter, August, 1869', reflects on the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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. Explains that the 'Devonian group' (evoking the name of a geological period) has now 'broken up' and its '"Stars" have vanished from the West'. Adds that the savants no longer debate such questions as 'agricultural labourers' wants', 'carbonif'rous labyryntodonts', 'man and his primaeval ways', 'the sun, the stars, the worlds in distant skies', the 'epiglotis, and the tidal wave', and anticipates the meeting of the association in 1870, 'HUXLEY'S Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825–95) DSB
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year'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 94.

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A Woman's Own Charity

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Gender, Mental Illness, Hospitals


    Discusses an appeal by Louisa Twining Twining, Louisa (1820–1912) ODNB
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on behalf of St Luke's Home for Incurable Women St Luke's Home for Incurable Women
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. Describes some of the ways in which women are deemed to be 'incurable', including their tendency to be 'incurable chatterboxes', their 'incurably extravagant' tastes, and their inability to be cured of 'their whims'. However, notes that the trajectory of 'crinolinomania' demonstrates that women's maladies may subside. Concludes by noting how much Twining has received in subscriptions, and explains that supporting her cause will allow incurable diseases to be 'palliated'.



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Issue 1470 (11 September 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 95.

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Phrenology and Frenzy

Jeremiah Bumps Bumps, Jeremiah
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Politics, Observation, Entomology, Reasoning, Evolution, Darwinism, Human Development, Amusement, Controversy, Medical Practitioners, Mental Illness, Hospitals, Phrenology, Charlatanry, Superstition

People mentioned:

Astley P Cooper Cooper, Sir Astley Paston, 1st Baronet (1768–1841) ODNB
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    Begins by noting that with the cessation of the 'lively, pithy, and concise debates of the [parliamentary] Session [...] the British Public, betake ourselves for intellectual recreation to the fields of science'. Emphasises that this requires us to exercise 'our observant faculties on swarms of ladybirds' and employ 'our reasoning powers in arguments about the origin of species, particularly those relative to the dispute touching the human pedigree' and our descent from anthropoid apes. Suggests that those who pose scientific questions at this time of year will be contributing to the 'public stock of harmless amusement', and will not be bores. Accordingly, turns to the 'divers reviews' of Memoir of John Conolly, M.D. Conolly, John (1794–1866) ODNB
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Clark, James 1869. A Memoir of John Conolly, M.D., D.C.L.: Comprising a Sketch of the Treatment of the Insane in Europe and America, London: J. Murray
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, the 'rational and reforming mad doctor' who 'succeeded in abolishing the system of mechanical restraint at Hanwell County Lunatic Asylum, Hanwell
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'. Proceeds to discuss James Deville Deville, James (1777–1846) DNBS
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, the 'gas-fitter' and phrenologist who argued that 'order was maintained at Hanwell without force' by classifying inmates according to 'the craniological conformation of their heads'. Suggests that if this was the case then it constitutes 'a very considerable reply' to the claim that phrenology is humbug. Contests that 'phrenology is not all humbug if available for the government of lunatics' and believes it is not a superstition even if it is a 'mistake'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 96.

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Another Tradition Gone Down

"A Matter of Fiction Man" Matter of Fiction Man, A
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Gravity, Discovery, Scientific Practitioners, Steam-power, Invention


    Begins with an extract from the Athenaeum Athenaeum (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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describing a 'remarkable manuscript' containing 'an interesting account', written by Isaac Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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to Martin Folkes Folkes, Martin (1690–1754) ODNB
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, of the 'discovery' of gravitation, an account that makes no mention of the 'fall of an apple' having been the source of the discovery. The author of the following letter identifies himself as a 'lover of old traditions and stories' and expresses his dismay at the discovery of this manuscript. He hopes that other myths about Newton will not subsequently be shattered. However, he insists that he is 'prepared now for any heavy blow', including the shattering of such myths as James Watt Watt, James (1736–1819) DSB
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'watching the steam issuing from the family tea-kettle' (the alleged inspiration for his steam-engine). Concludes by urging that 'We ought to be ashamed of our credulity, and get rid of these old wives' fables without delay'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 97.

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The Cry of "No Jennery!"

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Vaccination, Medical Treatment, Human Development, Medical Practitioners, Quackery, Nutrition, Statistics


    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of a recent meeting, in London's East End, of the Anti-Vaccination League Anti-Compulsory Vaccination League
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, where the 'illustrious' Edmond Beales Beales, Edmond (1803–81) ODNB
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was one of those on the platform. Expresses surprise at Beales's presence at the meeting and discusses the speech of a Mr Stephens Stephens, Mr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/10/3
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of the east London branch of the Anti-Compulsory Vaccination League Anti-Compulsory Vaccination League
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, which ridiculed a man who had been jailed for neglecting to have his child vaccinated. Proceeds to deride another speaker at the meeting—Mr Rymer Rymer, Mr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/10/3
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—for declaring the 'law enforcing vaccination' to be 'repugnant to the British Constitution', without offering a better 'preservative of the British Constitution'. Suggests that Rymer and Beales would replace Edward Jenner's Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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'discovery' with the quack medicine of James Morison Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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and Thomas Holloway Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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. Speculates on the differences between Holloway and Morison on the subject of vaccination, stressing the different types of medical dissenters, some of whom would substitute vaccination for a diet of 'Delicious Peas-pudding'. Concludes by suggesting that the 'comparative statistics, sustaining the case for vaccination' might as well be posted in such public places as public houses, given how many people are turning to 'medical dissent' on the subject of vaccination.



Punch,  57 (1869), 101.

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The Shooting of the Future

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Hunting, Agriculture, Steam-power, Technology, Progress


    Following a suggestion in the Pall Mall Gazette Pall Mall Gazette (1865–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that pointers should be 'shoed', anticipates that the 'progress of agriculture' will lead to even more advanced techniques including 'steam cart-horses', the 'steam-dog', and hunting conducted with 'steam guns' and 'steam pointers'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 102.

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The Genealogy of the Gorilla; or, Can a Race Degenerate (Respectfully Dedicated to the British Association) British Association for the Advancement of Science
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Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Animal Development, Evolution, Spiritualism, Human Species, Degeneration, Descent, Religious Authority, Pollution, Industry, Environmentalism, Chemistry, Force, Progress, Commerce, Aesthetics, Human Development, Mental Illness, Amusement, Psychology, Race, Morality


    Begins by inviting readers to 'Hear a Gorilla', which, like a 'sprite-possessed, / A Medium-ape', tells the story of his descent from 'Ancient Man'—a reversal of the assumed descent of man from apes. The gorilla begins by describing an idyllic 'Island of the Sea' where his first ancestors lived, a race that were 'the chiefest of the human kind' but whose 'last degenerate race bred ours'. Explains how a pair of these degenerate humans clung 'to a floating tree' when the isle was 'whelmed' and proceeds to describe the gradual degeneration of the race and the catastrophe that struck the island. Blames 'Material Progress' for the destruction of the beautiful buildings and landscape, and for the other ways in which this 'Island's beauty and its joy' was overwhelmed. He laments that science 'put chemic and mechanic force' into 'sordid hands', and thus made 'creatures covetous and coarse' and consume 'too fast'. The consequences of these developments also included 'close-clustered houses' encroaching on 'the commons and the downs', the pollution of pure rivers by 'slush of factories, and manure', the decline of 'Art, architecture, letters', the starvation of genius, the displacement of drama by 'Buffooneries and sensation plays', and the disappearance of 'the higher powers of thought' and 'Justice, Faith, Charity, and Hope'. He emphasizes that his fathers liked each other 'as Chinese' and lived 'by competitive / Examination' (a possible reference to the 'survival of the fittest' and to the Civil Service Civil Service
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examinations), but gradually turned into apes 'by degrees': their crowns 'slowly sank' and their foreheads 'sloped and shrank' backwards, their jaws advanced, and they developed shag hair, 'eye-teeth turned fangs', and rear 'feet / Of climbing hands'. He concludes by noting how 'Chaos came' (the sinking of the once-idyllic island) and 'Ocean's foam / Bore the Gorillas to their home', which is presumably a reference to Africa.



Punch,  57 (1869), 103.

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Beales Beales, Edmond (1803–81) ODNB
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v. Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Vaccination, Controversy, Politics


    Notes an 'agitation' which has 'been got up against Vaccination' and that Mr Punch 'rejoices to say that the movement [against Vaccination] has received its death blow' from Beales who, wanting to 'stamp the agitation as utterly ludicrous', has joined it.



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Issue 1471 (18 September 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 108.

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Sic Vos Non Vobis

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Science Communication, Music, Gender


    Depicts a scene at an evening party. In the foreground, a pianist captures the attention of a number of ladies, all of whom appear to have left a room shown in the background. The latter room is completely deserted, except for two intellectual gentlemen who sit looking dejected. The caption ('Literature, Science, and Music at an Evening Party—Total Defeat of the Two Former') indicates that the ladies prefer the company of the pianist to that of the intellectuals who spout 'Literature' and 'Science'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 108.

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The Blue Knife (From a Contemporary)

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Meteorology, Animal Husbandry, Accidents, Death


    Responds to news that 'Sixteen sheep have been killed by lightning'. Ponders the significance of this story, given that so many sheep are killed each year and that few need to be reminded 'that lightning is but as mechanical as the action of the fusee that kindles the Havannah of the cynic'. Argues that by dying this way, these sheep have been spared the cruel fate of their fellow creatures (including the butcher's 'finishing blade'), but that far from being 'out of created space', their 'transmuted entity' will provide the materials from which 'daisies and buttercups grow'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 111.

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Worcester Sauce (From Our Special Commissioner)

Peeper the Great Peeper the Great
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Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Music, Instruments, Technology, Electricity, Accidents


    Describes events at the Worcester Music Festival Worcester Music Festival [Three Choirs Festival]
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of 1869, notably the rehearsals and performance of Arthur S Sullivan's Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour (1842–1900) ODNB
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oratorio The Prodigal Son. The author draws attention to the fact that the organ was run from a cylinder powered by 'several batteries', there being a 'chain' connecting 'the notes with the pipes' and another linking the 'organist with the notes, and a third the organist with the cylinder'. Explains that to play at the correct tempo, the organist 'receives the exact number of shocks which force[s] him to play precisely in the time, and the notes which the composer wishes'. While the composer 'turns the cylinder, and winds up the organist', the author himself was allowed to operate the cylinder, although he was so 'excited' with the music that he turned the machine too fast thus causing the cylinder to crack, the organist to be thrown in the air, and the organ to play 'five Oratorios all at once'. He laments that the force of the electric currents was so great that 'no one could venture near' him, and the organ manufacturers were whirled around when they tried to fix the instrument. He concludes this part of his report by resolving to investigate the matter.



Punch,  57 (1869), 113.

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Recent Cruelty to Animals (Reported in the "Times" The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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Last Week)

Bullock Smythie Smythie, Bullock
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

R Pritchett Pritchett, Robert Taylor (1828–1907) ODNB
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Subjects:

Cruelty, Animal Husbandry, Politics, Government, Crime, Morality


    The initial letter forms part of an illustration showing a herd of oxen streaming past a tree, one of the oxen attempting to fell the tree. Hanging on the tree's trunk and branches are three frightened young boys. The writer laments the brutal conditions suffered by cattle on being transported from Rotterdam, condemning the fact that cattle are 'bullied', catch diseases 'by cramming', and are 'goaded and hounded on to the shore'. Calls on the clerk of the Privy Council Privy Council Office
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, Arthur Helps Helps, Sir Arthur (1813–75) ODNB
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, to ensure that those who issue these 'brutal commands' are punished. Hopes to see the end of cattle being beaten and to see 'gentle smiles' irradiating the 'shepherd's countenance as he drives his lambkins to the new emporium'. He also wishes to see drovers using gentler language as they drive their charges through the streets.



Punch,  57 (1869), 113.

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The Elasticity of Young Ladies

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Health, Disease, Gender, Physiology, Anatomy, Controversy


    Discusses the topical question of whether tight-lacing is injurious to health. Insists that it is not so for women, arguing that woman is made 'more wonderfully and more fearfully' than man and that while she is 'always ailing', her ailments are caused by 'over-exertion and other varieties of self-sacrifice'. Believes that tight-lacing would be 'uncomfortable' for men, because they breathe 'partly from the pectoral muscles which expand the ribs' and would be constrained by tight-lacing. Adds that tight-laced men would suffer a variety of abdominal complaints caused by pressure on his organs. Compares this situation with that of women. Explains that women breath independently of their pectoral muscles and have a more 'plastic organisation', both of which enable them to withstand tight-lacing. Concludes by warning of the dangers (some fatal) of overly tight women's garments, but points out that 'lacing has evidently no consequences which prevent women from wearing stays as tight as they think pretty'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 114.

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Scotch 'Salmody

C K Keene, Charles Samuel (1823–91) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

C K Keene, Charles Samuel (1823–91) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Military Technology, Hunting


    Shows a Scottish highlander standing on some rocks near a salmon-infested river. He holds a large tube that has fired a long fishing line, on the end of which is a struggling salmon. The caption explains that, according to the Inverness Courier Inverness Courier (1817–1900+) COPAC
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, a new rocket gun has been invented 'with which a distinguished sportsman (the inventor) has done great execution on the salmon in the Highland rivers when they won't take a fly'.



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Issue 1472 (25 September 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 115.

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Chawbacons and Chawpraties

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Instinct


Punch,  57 (1869), 116.

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Schools of Humane Science

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Cruelty, Education, Class, Animal Behaviour, Hunting


    Praises Angela G Burdett-Coutts Burdett-Coutts, Angela Georgina, 1st Baroness (1814–1906) ODNB
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for her 'proposal to make kindness to dumb creatures a branch of education'. Challenges the notion that people whose education is deficient in this regard are from 'the bottom of the social scale', emphasizing that the 'higher classes' who shoot pigeons are no better than the yokels who enjoy 'forcing a pig through a hole which is too small for him'. Suggests that Burdett-Coutt's proposal would teach the Gun Club Gun Club
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'how not to shoot', and teach its members only to kill birds outright, rather than allowing birds to die from their shot wounds.



Punch,  57 (1869), 116.

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Songs of Sixpence. VII—The Baron Hanwell of Colney Hatch Colney Hatch Asylum
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Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Hospitals


Punch,  57 (1869), 116.

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The Foulborough Cattle Plague

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Politics, Commerce, Charlatanry, Government, Animal Husbandry, Disease, Sanitation


    Exploiting the parallels between political corruption and the cattle plague, reports that the 'epidemic' continues, 'particularly in the Eastern and Western Counties', and explains that the disease is caused by 'Acarus scabiei', which causes 'an itching palm' that can only be relieved by 'Banker's golden ointment'—i.e. money. Hopes this 'disease of the body politic' will be stamped out by the government, which can be achieved by stopping millionaires with 'political aspirations' from touching 'the Polls' as well as disinfecting the 'Booths to which the Foulborough Cattle are driven'. Explains that the disease 'originate[s] in morbid acquisitiveness'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 116.

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Conjecture Verified

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Gravity, Scientific Practitioners, Discovery, Controversy, Charlatanry


    Reports that the 'NEWTON Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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PASCAL Pascal, Blaise (1623–62) DSB
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' letters (documents apparently demonstrating Pascal's priority in the invention of 'Newton's' theory of gravitation) 'have turned out forgeries by a rascal'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 117.

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"Wallace Wallace, Sir William (d. 1305) ODNB
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Wight"

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Observation, Astronomy, Instruments

People mentioned:

Galileo Galilei Galilei, Galileo (1564–1642) DSB
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Punch,  57 (1869), [119].

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"Am Not I a Brute and a Brother?"

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Cruelty, Animal Husbandry, Morality


    Responding to debate concerning the cruelty inflicted on cattle during their transportation to England, this illustration shows an ox standing in front of a herd of cattle. It has collapsed forwards and is about to be struck by a drover with a long stick. The ox utters the words of the title of the illustration, parodying the motto of the anti-slavery movement, 'Am I not a Man and a Brother?'. Here the ox takes the part of the oppressed black slave.



Punch,  57 (1869), 122.

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A Thought in Maddox Street

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Cruelty, Politics

People mentioned:

Angela G Burdett-Coutts, Burdett-Coutts, Angela Georgina, 1st Baroness (1814–1906) ODNB
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Arthur Helps Helps, Sir Arthur (1813–75) ODNB
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Punch,  57 (1869), 122–23.

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More Happy Thoughts  [13/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Sanitation, Animal Husbandry, Disease


    Describes the narrator's encounter with Cazell, a critical fellow who, when visiting the narrator's house, asks him about the building's drainage system. At this moment the narrator is visited by Dr Balsam, who has come to see his wife and baby; the doctor tells him that he understood that the 'Inspector of Nuisances' had visited and urges him to clean out his pigsty. Cazell surmises that a foul odour that he has been smelling derives from the sty and urges the narrator to disinfect the place and prevent an outbreak of fever.


Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
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Punch,  57 (1869), 123.

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Another Great Scandal

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Societies, Language, Mathematics, Morality, Biology


    The author's opinion of mathematics as a 'steady and decorous science' has been 'completely shaken' by the title of one of the papers given at the recent British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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meeting—'On Conic Osculation' (a version of which was published as Newman 1870 Newman, F. W. 1870. 'On Conic Osculation', Report of the Thirty-Ninth Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science held at Exeter in August 1869, Notes and Abstracts of Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 13–14
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). Suggests that this implies intimate relations between geometrical figures. Also suggests that another paper presented to the association ('On Initial Life'; a version of which was published as Wake 1870 Wake, Charles Staniland 1870. 'Initial Life', Report of the Thirty-Ninth Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science; Held at Exeter in August 1889, Notes and Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 151
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) refers to 'those strange advertisements which head the second column of the Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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'.


See also:

Anon, 'A Growing Evil', Punch, 54 (1868), 112


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Issue 1473 (2 October 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 125.

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A Verdict on Vaccination

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Vaccination, Death, Crime, Expertise


    Describes how a 'simpleton' recently sought a police magistrate court's decision to compel a Highgate cemetery company to inscribe on his child's tombstone 'Died from the mortal effects of vaccination', which was also the verdict of a coroner's jury. Surmises that a coroner's jury would not be able to understand medical evidence showing that the child died from a 'poisoned wound, and not merely of plain puncture'. Urges that coroner's juries should only be allowed to deliver verdicts on 'questions within their competence', and not post hoc ergo propter hoc verdicts on a death following vaccination. Praises the cemetery company for objecting to the inscription on the tomb and thus for preventing 'prejudice against vaccination' which would crowd the cemetery.



Punch,  57 (1869), 125.

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More Gorilla

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Development, Animal Behaviour, Evolution, Darwinism, Heat, Invention, Music, Instruments, Language, Nutrition, Domestic Economy, Philosophy


    Addressed to Mr Punch, this poem is a response to Anon, 'The Genealogy of the Gorilla; or, Can a Race Degenerate (Respectfully Dedicated to the British Association)', Punch, 57 (1869), 102. The writer begins by warning Mr Punch that the 'Medium Gorilla' has 'spun you / A yarn of lies, as to his breed', and then invites him to read Charles R Darwin Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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to learn about the 'millions of years [...] It took a Baboon to develope / Monstrosity into a man'. Proceeds to his alternative history of the development of man from monkeys and gorillas. This explains the long history of how monkeys and gorillas developed the physical and cultural attributes of humans: these include their creation of sparks for fire (after a monkey 'was pounding / Some nuts with two stones in the dark), the invention of a xylophone (after a Monkey 'Laid several sticks in a row'), the transformation of simian 'jabber' to the 'language MAX MüLLER Max Müller, Friedrich (1823–1900) ODNB
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describes', food rationing and brewing, and the proliferation of 'Metaphysical apes', who inscribed 'abstract' ideas on sand or bark and gradually bit off their tails, since they got in the way when they were writing. Invites Mr Punch to 'admire how plastic is nature' because the 'tail-hating' gorillas 'Had little gorillas without', and notes that such 'tailless' and 'brainless' gorillas still 'roam on the African shore', beasts who believe they are the 'cream of the cream' of their species.



Punch,  57 (1869), 126.

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A Wanton Warning to Vanity

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Gender, Health, Death, Periodicals


    Attacks the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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(which Punch regarded as its 'fashionable contemporary') for publishing an article reporting the death of a young woman from tight-lacing, a report which Punch thinks will terrify those 'dear girls who take in such instructive journals as the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine (1852–90) Waterloo Directory
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'. The report states that the woman collapsed in a park, and was examined by Dr Smellie Smellie, Dr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/13/3
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who claimed that the cause of death was 'effusion of blood on the chest [...] accelerated by compression of the chest' caused by tight-lacing. Notes that this report will deter girls from tight-lacing, but suggests that girls have a 'propensity' to follow fashions regardless of consequences and will not therefore be perturbed by the gruesome newspaper report.



Punch,  57 (1869), 127.

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The Sham at St. Cloud (Exposed by Zadkiel Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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)

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication


    Discusses predictions made by the 'Voice of the Stars' in the August 1869 issue of Zadkiel's Monthly Almanac Zadkiel's Almanac and Herald of Astrology (1836–1900+) BUCOP
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. Notes that his predictions for Prince Edward Edward VII, King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor of India (1841–1910) ODNB
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and Princess Alexandra Alexandra [Princess Alexandra of Denmark]Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the British dominions beyond the seas, and Empress of India, consort of Edward VII (1844–1925) ODNB
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appear to have been confirmed, but points out that he did not predict the illness of Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France, a fact that Punch links to sinister cunning on Napoleon's part.



Punch,  57 (1869), 127.

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Food for Powder and Fire-Damp

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Industry, Accidents, Crime, Death


    Begins by pondering the problem of establishing the cause of powder-mill explosions, a tragedy that witnesses rarely survive. Argues that one explanation is suggested by a recent report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, which describes how workmen at one powder-mill were suspended for possessing pipes and lucifer matches. Punch suggests that cautioning such workmen against using pipes is useless given that they are 'idiotic as to the sense of danger', and compares them to miners who 'light their tobacco' with Davy Davy, Sir Humphry, Baronet (1778–1829) DSB ODNB
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lamps, and who are so 'tired of their lives' as to want to commit suicide.



Punch,  57 (1869), 128.

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Merely a Record

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Mathematics, Physics, Mechanics, Discovery, Gravity, Charlatanry


    Notes that Jean-Baptiste-André Dumas Dumas, Jean-Baptiste-André (1800–84) DSB
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has spoken 'so admirably upon the forgeries that imposed upon poor M. CHASLES Chasles, Michel (1793–1880) DSB
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that no more need ever be said on the subject'. (Chasles was a mathematician who unwittingly bought forged manuscripts suggesting that Blaise Pascal Pascal, Blaise (1623–62) DSB
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rather than Isaac Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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was the true inventor of the theory of gravitation.) Punch notes that Dumas insisted that Chasles had forgotten 'what was due to HUYGHENS Huygens, Christiaan (1629–95) DSB
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, the glory of his country, and NEWTON, the glory of humanity', and that the Académie des Sciences, Paris Académie des Sciences, Paris
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(of which Dumas was permanent secretary) thus associates itself with Holland and England in saving Huygens's and Newton's reputation.



Punch,  57 (1869), 128.

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Duck Him!

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Technology, Engineering, Language


    Claims that the 'new London improvement' that reminds one of a submarine cable is, according to a 'miserable Cockney', 'A vire ducked'. This is a reference to the recently opened Holborn Viaduct Holborn Viaduct
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.



Punch,  57 (1869), 131.

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Cases Shot Flying

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Hospitals


    Responds to a report in the British Medical Journal British Medical Journal (1857–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of a dispute between staff and governors at St Bartholomew's Hospital St Bartholomew's Hospital
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. According to the report the staff representative, Dr Mayo Mayo, Dr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/13/8
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, complained of the excessive duties of a house physician, including the necessity of seeing 100 patients each hour every morning. Punch compares the physician who despatches 'so many patients in so short a time' to 'the historical dog Billy, celebrated for killing a hundred rats in five minutes'. Hopes this analogy will prompt the governors of St Bartholomew's to expand their staff so that all patients are adequately attended to.



Punch,  57 (1869), 131.

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Line of Battle in Smoke

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, War, Cultural Geography

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Begins by pondering the 'pleasant' prospect that an English war with Prussia and Germany is unlikely, but presents an extract from a recent 'leader' in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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on 'The Cruise of the Lords of the Admiralty Admiralty
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' (Anon 1869 Anon. 1869. 'On the Cruise of the Lords of the Admiralty', The Times, 28 September 1869, p. 6
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), warning that if the English fleet were to be called into action, it would soon be engulfed by such dense smoke (from its guns) that both signals and enemy ships would become invisible. Notes that the Germans invented gun-cotton and could use it to fire naval guns without shrouding their own ships in smoke, whilst accurately firing on smoke-shrouded English vessels.



Punch,  57 (1869), 131.

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A New School

Anon

Genre:

Literary Announcement

Subjects:

Periodicals


    Announces the launch of 'A new critical journal', the Academy Academy (1869–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, and discusses the significance of its title.



Punch,  57 (1869), 132.

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His Eminence Dean Close Close, Francis (1797–1882) ODNB
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Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Religion, Faith, Discovery, Religious Authority


    Quotes from a correspondent in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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the assertion that the Dean of Carlisle, Francis Close Close, Francis (1797–1882) ODNB
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, was guilty of assuming that 'science must necessarily, and actually does, tend to the subversion of the Christian religion' and that Christianity views 'scientific discovery' with 'contemptuous antagonism'. Thinks this shows that 'Extremes meet', noting the proximity of the evangelical Close's views to those of Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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.



Punch,  57 (1869), 133.

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Interesting to Naturalists

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Language


Punch,  57 (1869), 134.

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And What Then?

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Anthropology, Human Development, Statistics


    Discusses a report of a paper by John Beddoe Beddoe, John (1826–1911) DSB
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presented at the recent meeting of the Anthropological Society Anthropological Society of London
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(a version of which was published as Beddoe 1867–69 Beddoe, John 1867–69. 'On the Stature and Bulk of Man in the British Isles', Memoirs Read Before the Anthropological Society of London, 3, 384–573
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). Beddoe announced that he has discovered that the tallest men lived in upper Galloway, the heaviest in Berwickshire, and the smallest 'among the Spitalfields weavers'. Mocks the apparent uselessness of this information, telling Beddoe that its own 'Special Commissioner' has furnished some equally useless information, including the discovery that 'in Cornwall are the most men who squint' and that in Herefordshire are 'the most men who never blow their noses'.



^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1474 (9 October 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 136.

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A Light Matter

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Pollution, Invention, Heat, Light, Energy


    Noting the 'alleged' new invention of a process for converting sewage into gas, suggests that igniting the River Thames may be possible and profitable and hopes that the sewage could be converted before it is deposited in the river, thus reducing the high cost of gas in London.



Punch,  57 (1869), 137.

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The Emperor and the Press

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Extract, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Politics, Medical Treatment, Narcotics


    Presents a series of extracts reporting on the recovery from illness of Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France. They include details of the medical treatment he received, including an opiate prescribed by his physician Auguste J B Nélaton Nélaton, Auguste Jean Baptiste (1807–73) WBI
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, and the therapeutic effect of saline and rural breezes.



Punch,  57 (1869), 138.

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Our Poulterers and Birds of Prey

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Natural History, Zoology, Museums, Ornithology, Hunting, Morality, Crime, Politics, Government


    Challenges the proposal to remove the collections of 'stuffed birds and other zoological specimens' in the British Museum British Museum
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and store them elsewhere. Instead argues that the collections should be 'destroyed' since natural historical objects are useless and stuffed natural historical objects more so. As Britons have been 'abandoning British Birds to gradual extinction', 'British Ornithology', as well as 'Natural History and Zoology', is 'utter bosh'. Notes that a recent 'writer' in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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lamented the decline in the number of birds of prey, a conclusion which the author corroborates. Noting that birds of prey are slaughtered in the interests of aristocratic poulterers, questions the use of stuffed birds of prey. Concludes by calling on Parliament Houses of Parliament
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to follow up its recent law protecting sea-birds from hunters, with new legislation affording 'raptorial birds some protection from the landed poulterers'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 138.

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A Matter of Consequence

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Vaccination, Controversy

People mentioned:

Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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Punch,  57 (1869), 141.

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More Happy Thoughts  [14/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Disease, Medical Treatment

Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
Close   View the register entry >>


Punch,  57 (1869), 142.

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A Bit of Botany

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Botany, Medical Treatment, Religion, Religious Authority


    Noting that the 'Colchium autumnale, of repute for Gout, is now in bloom', points out that it is 'flowering quite seasonably' and that like another flower associated with spring, 'the wild Hyacinth', has 'unlooked-for blowing in Paris' that has 'astonished the Ultramontanes'. This is a reference to Père Hyacinthe Hyacinthe, Père (properly Charles Loyson) (1827–1912) CBD
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, a popular Carmelite preacher, who, on 20 September 1869, resigned his position after protesting against the doctrine of papal infallibility and encroachments by the papacy.



Punch,  57 (1869), 143.

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A Neapolitan Fiasco

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Supernaturalism, Miracle, Physiology, Charlatanry


    Comments on a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of an eye-witness account of the liquefaction of the blood of St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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in Naples. The witness stressed that the blood did not froth (contrary to 'French writers on the miracle') or possess the colour of blood, and that it moved altogether when it moved at all. Punch thinks the blood is 'altogether a bubble'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 143.

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Very Sensible

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Health, Pollution


    Praises the discussion by the Social Science Congress Social Science Congress
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of the subject of ventilation.



Punch,  57 (1869), 144.

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Punch's Alphabet  [2/2]George L P B Du Maurier, 'Punch's Alphabet', Punch, 57 (1869), 84

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D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery, Serial

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoology, Anatomy, Physiology


    For the letter Z, Punch presents a 'zoophyte', whose 'heart's in his head' and whose 'head's in his "tum!"'. The illustration shows a vaguely human-looking zoophyte at the bottom of the sea, having a face in its abdomen, a heart where its nose should be, and a stomach in its head.



^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1475 (16 October 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 145.

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Mr. Punch's Designs after Nature

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [6]

Illustrators:

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Gender, Amusement, Natural History, Entomology


    Shows a woman standing on a pier overlooking the sea. Her bonnet, dress, and two large transparent wings attached to her back give her the appearance of a large wasp. In the background another woman wears a similar costume. The caption suggests that 'wasp-waisted women' might adopt this costume 'with advantage'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 147.

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The Professions in Petticoats

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Gender, Professionalization


    Praises the objectives of the Female Medical Society Female Medical Society
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and its associated institution, the Female Medical College Female Medical College
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. Notes that the society's patron is Anthony A Cooper (7th Earl of Shaftesbury) Cooper, Anthony Ashley, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (formerly styled 'Lord Ashley') (1801–85) ODNB
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and urges that it should be supported by men with or without female wives and sisters. In a recent speech to the society Dr Drysdale Drysdale, Dr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/15/2
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argued in favour of women entering 'the professions and the trades' and thought they surpass men as barristers. Punch responds by ridiculing the idea of women as barristers and divines.



Punch,  57 (1869), 147.

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Historical Facts (For the Use of Colwell-Hatchney Colney Hatch Asylum
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Schools)
  [1/3]Anon, 'Historical Facts (For the Use of Colwell-Hatchney Schools)', Punch, 57 (1869), 161
Anon, 'Historical Facts (Being Extracts from the Celebrated Course of Colwell-Hatchney Lectures, for the Use of Students, and All Those Whom Providence Has Blessed with Affluence)', Punch, 57 (1869), 187

Close

Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Ancient Authorities, Gravity, Mechanics, Discovery, Exploration


    A series of dubious historical 'facts' including the claim that Plato Plato (428–348/7 BC) DSB
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'invented the Laws of Gravity' after which he never smiled, and that 'an American discovered COLUMBUS Columbus, Christopher (1451–1506) CBD
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before COLUMBUS discovered America'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 147.

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The Tidal Wave

Anon

Genre:

Song

Subjects:

Meteorology, Prognostication, Astrology, Charlatanry


    Praises Stephen M Saxby Saxby, Stephen Martin (1804–83) WBI
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for correctly predicting the recent tidal wave, and thinks he has proved himself to be a 'prophet' whose name 'shall live for ever' with that of the astrologer Zadkiel (Richard J Morrison Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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).



Punch,  57 (1869), 148.

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Studies of Animal Life  [1/3]George L P B Du Maurier, 'Studies of Animal Life', Punch, 57 (1869), 158
George L P B Du Maurier, 'Studies of Animal Life', Punch, 57 (1869), 186

Close

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery, Serial

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Gender, Domestic Economy


    With a title parodying Lewes 1862 Lewes, George Henry 1862. Studies in Animal Life, London: Smith, Elder and Co.
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, this illustration shows a Victorian parlour in which four female domestic servants stand back in terror at a tiny toad. The caption that this is 'The Common Toad (Bufo disgustans)'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 148.

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An Unprosperous Prospero

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Libraries

Publications cited:

Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  57 (1869), 151.

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Le Follet's Autumn Flowers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Light, Instruments, Heat

People mentioned:

Humphry Davy Davy, Sir Humphry, Baronet (1778–1829) DSB ODNB
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Punch,  57 (1869), 151.

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The Foot and Mouth Disease

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Disease, Religion, Superstition


    Distinguishes 'two types' of this 'distemper', one being an 'epizoic among milchcows in England', the other being the kissing by 'Romanists' of the foot of the pope or of the toe of a statue in St Peter's, Rome St Peter's, Rome
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. Warns that both are 'highly contagious', the religious form being spread by various English Catholics.



Punch,  57 (1869), 152.

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Popping About with Guns

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Hunting, Ornithology, Cruelty, Government, Politics, Class


    Discusses the proposal (spearheaded by George C G F Berkeley Berkeley, George Charles Grantley Fitzhardinge (1800–81) ODNB
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) to implement a gun tax 'to protect small birds from hobble-de-hoys'. Relishes the possibility of a tax that would 'abate the confiscation inflicted on a class under the name of Income-Tax'. Warns that such a penalty would 'prevent poor boys and not rich' from shooting birds, and that it would not prevent the Gun Club Gun Club
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from pursuing its activities. Suggests that Berkeley's disgust of young boys who shoot birds on Boxing Day is misplaced since such boys are no worse than gentlemen who indulge in 'cover-shooting'. Concludes by insisting that small birds should be protected 'like the sea-fowl'—a reference to a recent piece of government legislation—and that cruelty should be prohibited rather than licensed.



Punch,  57 (1869), 152.

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Known Far and Wide

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology


Punch,  57 (1869), 153.

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More Happy Thoughts  [15/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Health, Disease, Human Development, Sanitation, Medical Practitioners


    Describes the anxiety of narrator's wife respecting a disease he may have caught from the pigs and chickens on his farm. She sends for a doctor who examines their baby and discovers a 'new rash' on its body. The doctor advises the family to go abroad for 'a change', a proposal with which the narrator agrees because this will allow the 'Inspector' to rebuild his pigstys in a more sanitary fashion. The narrator also describes his continued problems with 'rheumatics'.


Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
Close   View the register entry >>


Punch,  57 (1869), 153.

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The Seers at Sea

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Meteorology, Prognostication, Charlatanry


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1476 (23 October 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 155.

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The Cawing Social Congress

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Societies, Animal Behaviour, Ornithology


    Describes this time of year as one when 'Great flocks of rooks [...] Swarm in the air and in the trees', 'cloud the sky with their rustling wings', and caw until nightfall. Identifies the cause as the Social Science Congress Social Science Congress
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, whose members' 'annual jawing' matches 'with a correspondent cawing'. However, notes that 'there's music in the raucous / Cries uttered by the corvine caucus' and compares this to the boring reports of the congress in the newspapers.



Punch,  57 (1869), 156.

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A Wizard No Conjuror

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Prognostication, Astrology, Charlatanry, Zoology, Zoological Gardens


    Praises Zadkiel (Richard J Morrison Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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) for correctly predicting (contrary to meteorologists) that no tidal wave would come, but notes that he did predict the death of 'one of the Elephants in the Zoo Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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'. Tells Zadkiel that the Zoological Society Zoological Society of London
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will not mind if he advertises this failed prediction.



Punch,  57 (1869), 157.

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Mr. Punch's Syllabus. Comprising (or Embracing, if You Like) Thirty Principal Errors under Which the Church of Rome is Labouring, with References to the Authorities Confuting Such Errors. Respectfully Prepared in Return for the List of Eighty Errors Imputed by H. H. Pius the Ninth Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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to the Educated World

Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Spoof

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Religion, Astronomy, Physiology, Miracle, Supernaturalism, Philosophy, Freethought


    This response to Henry E Manning's Manning, Henry Edward (1808–92) ODNB
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recent explanation of Pope Pius IX's Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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syllabus of errors consists of a list of 'errors' with the names of the authorities Punch has consulted. Includes the error that 'That the sun goes round the earth. [Prof. Airy Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
]', 'That ARCHBISHOP MANNING believes that the liquefying pomatum is the blood of S. Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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. [H Walkerius]', 'That Pantheism has received a blow in England by the Pantheon Pantheon, Oxford Street
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[the preaching venue of Charles H Spurgeon Spurgeon, Charles Haddon (1834–92) ODNB
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] being turned into a wine-merchant's warehouse [Gilby & Co.]'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 157.

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Circular to Poor Law Guardians

S Pancras Pancras, S
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Disease, Nutrition, Utilitarianism, Human Development, Health, Nutrition, Morality


    Signed by the saint after whom a notorious London workhouse is named (St Pancras Poor Law Union Workhouse St Pancras Poor Law Union Workhouse
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), this letter reminds poor-law guardians of the foot and mouth epidemic which is 'now raging' among 'milch cows and feeding stock', an epidemic that has raised the price of dairy of milk, cheese and butter. He also reminds the guardians that the 'papers' may have informed them that the cruelty inflicted on cattle 'during their conveyance both by sea and land carriage' probably aggravates cattle plague and foot and mouth disease. Proceeds to tell them that the quantity of meat which they can provide for their inmates 'amounts to a very few' ounces, but asks them that 'If we were heathens' or cannibals we should be 'almost as anxious about the medical treatment of our sick poor as we are about that of our diseased cattle'. This implies that, since guardians are not heathens, they should take even better care of sick paupers than animals.



Punch,  57 (1869), 158.

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Studies of Animal Life  [2/3]George L P B Du Maurier, 'Studies of Animal Life', Punch, 57 (1869), 148
George L P B Du Maurier, 'Studies of Animal Life', Punch, 57 (1869), 186

Close

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery, Serial

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Domestic Economy, Language


    Shows a husband and wife in bed, both of whom have been woken by a mouse. The husband attempts to kill the mouse that appears to have run onto the bedclothes. The caption states that the mouse is also known as 'Ridiculus mus'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 161.

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Historical Facts (For the Use of Colwell-Hatchney Colney Hatch Asylum
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Schools)
  [2/3]Anon, 'Historical Facts (For the Use of Colwell-Hatchney Schools)', Punch, 57 (1869), 147
Anon, 'Historical Facts (Being Extracts from the Celebrated Course of Colwell-Hatchney Lectures, for the Use of Students, and All Those Whom Providence Has Blessed with Affluence)', Punch, 57 (1869), 187

Close

Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Engineering, Transport, Industrial Chemistry


    Includes the 'fact[s]' that the 'scheme of tunnelling under the Atlantic is not new' because it 'occurred to a gentleman some time ago, but he never mentioned it, and the secret died with him', and that 'Dyeing was discovered by the Syrians, and they dye'd in great numbers'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 161.

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Our Bêtise and Gaucherie

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Cultural Geography, Hunting, Cruelty, Ornithology


Punch,  57 (1869), 161.

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The Pope's Syllabus

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Religion, Progress, Scientific Practitioners, Astronomy, Spectroscopy


    This is a response to news of the imminent establishment of the Œcumenical Council Œcumenical Council, Rome
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, a Roman Catholic assembly that would proclaim papal infallibility on questions of morality and faith. Explains that Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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, is having 'a little "at home"' where he and 'lots of old ladies will meet and talk scandal, / And make of their neighbours' wrong-doings a handle'. Adds that the errors 'on his Programme' are large enough to 'fill a 'bus'. Warns that 'the Progress of Knowledge, with all of its fallacies, / From poor GALILEO Galilei, Galileo (1564–1642) DSB
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to Spectrum analysis—/ It's all at an end, the Philosopher's trade is, / The cry being "Room for the elderly ladies"'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 162.

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The Torments of Tight-Lacing

A Victim Victim, A
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Gender, Health, Disease, Controversy


    Identifying herself as 'a young lady', the writer tells Mr Punch that she has to tie herself as tightly as she can owing to the fashion for 'small waists'. She complains that her stays are causing her headaches and other pains, and corroborates 'what the doctors say' about the physiological consequences of tight-lacing. Grumbles that her stays prevent her from enjoying such activities as croquet and dancing, and criticises her maid for following the fashion, thereby making herself too ill to work. She concludes miserably by confessing that she would 'rather die than dress out of fashion'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 162.

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An Ultramhumane Idea

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Nutrition, Zoology, Cruelty, Zoology


Punch,  57 (1869), 163.

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Floreat!

Anon

Genre:

Literary Notice, Drollery

Subjects:

Periodicals

Publications cited:

Academy Academy (1869–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  57 (1869), 163.

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Layard Layard, Sir Austen Henry (1817–94) ODNB
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in the Lion's Mouth

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Religion, Astronomy

People mentioned:

Angelo Secchi Secchi, Angelo (Pietro Angelo) (1818–78) DSB
Close   View the register entry >>


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1477 (30 October 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 165.

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More Happy Thoughts  [17/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Periodicals, Medical Treatment, Homeopathy, Progress


    Describes the narrator's visit to the doctor's surgery, an experience that involves an excessively long wait in the waiting room, during which time he manages to read several volumes of Punch. He finally manages to see the doctor whose solution his rheumatic condition is for the author to travel abroad, and to take baths and waters. The narrator notes that at this moment he thought he should 'Pick up some medical notes' for the physiological portion of his great work, Typical Developments, and accordingly, he discusses with the doctor the application of 'Homeopathic theories' in 'Allopathic practice'. The doctor agrees with the narrator's claim that the 'science of medicine' is 'in a state of change' and that the 'old practices [...] require readaptation to the increasing knowledge of the present day'.


Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
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Punch,  57 (1869), 165.

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Old Ways Not Always the Best

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Railways, Transport, Accidents, Charlatanry


    Noting the argument that the frequency of fatal railways accidents could be reduced by adopting the 'block system', points out that railway companies still employ the 'blockhead system'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 168.

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Tobacco and its Antidote

One in the Clouds One in the Clouds
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Narcotics, Medical Treatment, Health, Nutrition


    Contains some 'rare good news' for 'habitual smokers': M Armand Armand, M (fl. 1869) PU1/57/17/3
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has informed the Académie des Sciences, Paris Académie des Sciences, Paris
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, that 'common watercress' can be used to make a 'sure antidote to nicotine'. The writer explains that his life has been 'made miserable' by his friends and family trying to stop him from smoking, but resolves that whenever he now buys tobacco he will also purchase some watercress and thus be spared the fatal consequences of smoking.



Punch,  57 (1869), [170]–[171].

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A Perilous Passage

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Politics, Transport, Invention


    Shows Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France, dressed as a circus performer who traverses a tight-rope on a velocipede. Represents his increasing difficulties with political opposition to his regime (notably his unpopular policies on Italy and Mexico, popular disillusionment with his economic policies and the corresponding rise of socialism and communism). The tight-rope is marked 'Message of July'—a reference to the controversial speech made by Napoleon announcing radical political changes, which prompted several ministerial resignations. The wheels of his velocipede are marked 'personal government' and 'representative government' and the ends of his balancing pole are labelled 'repression' and 'concession', referring to political issues that Napoleon was trying (but failing) to keep in the balance. Far below the tight-rope lie jagged rocks shrouded in mist that contains the ominous message 'revolution', which threatened Napoleon's empire.



Punch,  57 (1869), 174.

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Wonders Never Cease

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Invention


    Discusses the advantages of the invention of a 'nut-making machine'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 175.

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St. Bartholomew's St Bartholomew's Hospital
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Under Probe and Scalpel

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Hospitals, Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Surgery, Controversy, Disease


    Suggests that St Bartholomew's Hospital, like St Bartholomew Bartholomew of Farne, Saint (d. 1193) ODNB
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himself, is being 'flayed alive' by the discontented doctors who work there. Considers this unsurprising given reports that patients are being 'knocked off' at an alarming rate of 'one-thousand a-day on Monday and Tuesday mornings' by a scanty and inexperienced staff. Argues that 'one cannot wonder' that one of medical officers at the hospital (presumably Dr Mayo Mayo, Dr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/13/8
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) should have 'kicked under such a system', which has damaged the reputation of the hospital and lowered the morale of physicians and surgeons. Concludes by insisting that the 'flaying process' should continue until 'staff, time, and space' are no longer abused, 'proper attention' is given to 'casual and out-patients', and the hospital reforms its constitution.


See also:

Anon, 'Cases Shot Flying', Punch, 57 (1869), 131


Punch,  57 (1869), 175.

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Fenianism and Frenzy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Mental Illness

People mentioned:

Forbes B Winslow Winslow, Forbes Benignus (1810–74) ODNB
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Punch,  57 (1869), 175.

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Livingstone Livingstone, David (1813–73) ODNB
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All Alive

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Exploration, Physical Geography, Discovery, Prognostication, Astrology


    Praises Roderick I Murchison Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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for being 'as right as ZADKIEL Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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ever was wrong' in correctly anticipating that Livingstone would turn up 'alive and well' with a new discovery—the location of the 'source of the White Nile'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 176.

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Development and Demonstration

Cadwallader Cadwallader
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Darwinism, Evolution, Human Species, Human Development, Sex, Descent, Theory, Proof, Charlatanry, Religion, Religious Authority, Ancient Authority


    Draws Mr Punch's attention to a recent article in the Academy Academy (1869–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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(see Anon, 'A New Work by Mr Darwin', Academy, 1 (1869–70), 15–16) announcing that Charles R Darwin Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–82) DSB
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will be applying the conclusion of his Origin of Species Darwin, Charles Robert 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, London: John Murray
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to the human species. Presents an extract from the article describing the importance of sexual selection in human evolution, but insists that philosophers will be 'curious to see how Mr. Darwin traces his series of zoological love-tales from Man through his immediate progenitors, the anthropoid apes', to a 'Monad'—an ascent comprising 'milliards of milliards' of 'grades or links'. Wonders whether Darwin can demonstrate one of these links. Draws parallels between Darwin's 'theory of Development' and that of 'DR. NEWMAN' (a reference to John H Newman's Newman, John Henry (1801–90) ODNB
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Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine Newman, John Henry 1845. An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, London: James Toovey
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) asserting that they are 'incompatible' theories, but that both 'require confirmation'. Similarly notes that both Darwin and Pope Pius IX Pius IX, Pope (1792–1878) CBD
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are trying to 'establish Assumptions' (a reference to the basis of a scientific argument and the doctrine of the assumption of the Virgin Mary), and that both 'appear to assume facts that have no foundations'. However, suggests that Darwin, unlike representatives of the Roman Catholic Church, may be able to prove his theory, and that he will send his book to Mr Punch who, like the author, will be able to see how far human ancestry extends beyond Adam.



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Issue 1478 (6 November 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 179.

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Gems from Amsterdam

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Advertisement, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Industry, Chemistry, Commerce


    Introduces two specimens of 'Dutch industry' which Mr Punch's friends have brought back from the recently opened International Exhibition, Amsterdam International Exhibition, Amsterdam
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. The first is an advertisement for 'chimical files', which are claimed to relieve corns on the feet.



Punch,  57 (1869), 180.

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Familiar Astronomy

Anon

Genre:

Literary Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Instruments, Science Communication, Education, Popularization


    Considers the title of Half-Hours with the Stars Proctor, Richard Anthony 1869. Half-Hours with the Stars: A Plain and Easy Guide to the Knowledge of the Constellations, Showing, in Twelve Maps, the Position of the Principal Star-Groups Night After Night Throughout the Year, with Introduction and a Separate Explanation of Each, London: R. Hardwicke
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to indicate that we are 'growing rather too playful with the heavenly bodies' and anticipates the publication of similar titles including 'Spare Moments with the Aurora Borealis'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 183.

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More Happy Thoughts  [18/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 194–95
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Mesmerism, Psychology, Human Development, Gas Chemistry


    Describes a party at the house of a character named Milburd, where the narrator meets his friend Cazell, who spends his time smoothing down his trousers and inspecting the results. This 'has evidently a mesmeric effect' upon the narrator and other guests, and the narrator suggests that if Cazell were to continue for 'two hours, he would probably become mesmerically mechanical in his movement, and we should all be fixed staring at him in our chairs'. The narrator makes a note that he must include mesmerism in his 'Typical Developments'. Later he ponders the question of how to 'draw out' a chemist and more specifically, the behaviour of carbolic acid gas.


Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
Close   View the register entry >>


Punch,  57 (1869), 184.

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A Dove on Pigeon-Shooting

Angelina Angelina
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Hunting, Ornithology, Morality, Cruelty, Gender


    The signature to this letter may refer to Angela G Burdett-Coutts Burdett-Coutts, Angela Georgina, 1st Baroness (1814–1906) ODNB
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, who believed that kindness to animals should be part of national education. The author questions the writer of an article who insists that 'ladies and gentlemen' still tolerate pigeon-shooting while the 'general public' is beginning to despise it. Argues that it is unlikely that 'ladies' view pigeon-shooting with anything but 'indignation, and disgust'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 185.

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A Pons Asinorum

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Steamships, Military Technology


Punch,  57 (1869), 186.

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Studies of Animal Life  [3/3]George L P B Du Maurier, 'Studies of Animal Life', Punch, 57 (1869), 148
George L P B Du Maurier, 'Studies of Animal Life', Punch, 57 (1869), 158

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D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Serial, Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [6]

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Entomology, Zoology, Nutrition, Disease, Gender


    Defines a range of common domestic creatures in terms of their troublesome effects on human life. A man and a woman being shocked by a beetle squashed under the man's shoe illustrates 'Black Beetle (Scarabaeus Explodans)', a man reclining on a chaise longue and swatting a fly on his head illustrates 'The Fly (Musca Dementans)', a woman nagging her husband that he should not have eaten a lobster for dinner represents 'The Lobster (Crustaceum Resurgens Vindex)', a couple trying to catch a spider under a glass shows 'The Daddy Longlegs (Paterfamilias Longricus), a groom, sporting a huge insect bite on his nose while preparing for his wedding illustrates 'The Gnat (Culex Disfigurans)', and an elderly lady gingerly approaching a bed with some tongs depicts '(The —— (Unmentionable Norfolkienxe Hovardianum Insectum Trium Literarum)'.



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Issue 1479 (13 November 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 187.

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Business of the Board of Trade Board of Trade
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Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Measurement, Commerce, Charlatanry, Adulteration, Railways, Accidents, Crime, Politics, Government


    Begins by warning small 'chandlers and grocers' that the President of the Board of Trade, John Bright Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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, 'hates the scales that are untrue' but delights in 'Just weights', and has the power to 'check' their 'knavish deeds' with a 'stringent Bill'. Emphasises that this act will prosecute those 'Who sell by measures fraudulent, / Or falsify your tea', and especially ' Railway folk' for conducting 'incomplete inquests' into railway accidents and allowing trains to collide. Warns that 'The great no less than small' will suffer from this and that 'neglect however gross' will be dragged 'into day'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 187.

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Historical Facts (Being Extracts from the Celebrated Course of Colwell-Hatchney Colney Hatch Asylum
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Lectures, for the Use of Students, and All Those Whom Providence Has Blessed with Affluence)
  [3/3]Anon, 'Historical Facts (For the Use of Colwell-Hatchney Schools)', Punch, 57 (1869), 147
Anon, 'Historical Facts (For the Use of Colwell-Hatchney Schools)', Punch, 57 (1869), 161

Close

Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Genius, Exploration, Cosmology


    Under the heading of 'Genius', claims that 'HUMBOLDT Humboldt, Alexander von (Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von) (1769–1859) DSB
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insisted on remaining in the cradle until he had finished his Kosmos Humboldt, Alexander von 1845–62. Kosmos: Entwurf einer physischen Weltbeschreibung, 5 vols, Stuttgart; Tübingen: Cotta
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, a work of much labour and extensive research'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 188.

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Nothing Like Saving Time, Especially in Dressing

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Technology, Domestic Economy


    Shows a man shaving in front of a mirror. His chair has been adapted so that as he shaves, he can use his feet to operate pedals which drive a pulley connected to a rotary brush that sits on top of his head.



Punch,  57 (1869), 190, 193.

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Dr. Johnson Johnson, Samuel (1709–84) ODNB
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on the New Bridge

Anon

Genre:

Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Architecture, Controversy


    Following the recent opening of Joseph Cubitt's Cubitt, Joseph (1811–72) ODNB
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new Blackfriars Bridge Blackfriars Bridge
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this drama consists of an exchange between Queen Victoria Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and Empress of India (1819–1901) ODNB
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, several 'Citizens', Samuel Johnson, and Joseph Cubitt. Cubitt explains that in 1759, when the City of London Corporation of London
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'determined to build a bridge at Blackfriars, many schemes were laid before the authorities, one of them, I may observe, by the illustrious SMEATON Smeaton, John (1724–92) DSB
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', although the 'favoured competitor was a young Scot, named Robert Mylne Mylne, Robert (1733–1811) ODNB
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who proposed a bridge of nine elliptical arches'. Johnson then explains the ellipse to some citizens, and Cubitt responds by explaining that Johnson was engaged in a controversy with Mylne, the man of letters having 'great regard' for Mylne's rival, John Gwynn Gwynn (Gwyn or Gwynne), John (bap. 1713–1786) ODNB
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. In the midst of Johnson's pedantic comments on Cubitt's vocabulary and grammar, Cubitt praises Johnson for his 'marvellous mastery' of a topic (bridge building) foreign to his 'habitual investigations'. (190) The discussion then turns to the foundations of the Pitt Bridge which originally spanned the River Thames at Blackfriars, and which, according to Cubitt, was opened in November 1769. Queen Victoria agrees that it is fitting that Johnson should witness the opening of a bridge which has replaced the decaying and ruined bridge which he criticised, although Johnson points out that he believed Mylne's bridge 'might have endured many years longer, but for the removal of Old London Bridge London Bridge
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, and the liberation of the vast flow of waters restricted by those nineteen arches'. (193)



Punch,  57 (1869), 193.

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Hooray for the High Tide

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Meteorology, Prognostication


    Shows a boy floating on a box on a river flowing down a street, the result of a high tide. The caption claims that Stephen M Saxby Saxby, Stephen Martin (1804–83) WBI
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, the naval engineer who predicted this major storm, is 'right at last'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 193.

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Our Island for Ever!

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Engineering, Nationalism, Cultural Geography, Physical Geography


    Begins with an extract from the Pall Mall Gazette Pall Mall Gazette (1865–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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describing a meeting of 'French and English subscribers' to an 'international bridge' between England and France. The highly nationalistic poem that follows condemns this project as 'base and absurd' and describes its subscribers as 'traitors' who 'Would traverse our girdle [the seas around the British Isles] with dry land'. After firmly upholding the need to keep 'Great Britain an Island', explains that the projectors believed a tunnel between England and France 'Would not have destroyed insulation' but that a bridge would be a 'landway' between lands. Concludes by asserting that Britannia should always be an island.



Punch,  57 (1869), 193.

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Amusement for Leisure Hours

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Invention


Punch,  57 (1869), 194.

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A Squeak from the Scalpel

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Surgery, Education, Politics, Government


    Believes students at the London hospitals are like 'journalists in the great gooseberry season' because, according to a correspondent in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, they 'labour under a dearth of subjects'. Thinks this is reason for the Home Secretary, Henry A Bruce Bruce, Henry Austin, 1st Baron Aberdare (1815–95) ODNB
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, to take measures to 'preserve the science of medicine, and enable surgeons to obtain the knowledge which they require to perform operations'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 194–95.

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More Happy Thoughts  [19/37][Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 19–20
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 39–40
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 122–23
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 141
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 153
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 165
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 57 (1869), 183
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 28–29
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 34–35
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 51
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 56
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 67
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 83
[Francis C Burnand], 'More Happy Thoughts', Punch, 58 (1870), 89

Close

[Francis C Burnand] Burnand, Sir Francis Cowley (1836–1917) ODNB
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Genre:

Diary, Spoof, Serial

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Chemistry

Reprinted:

Burnand 1871 Burnand, Francis Cowley 1871. More Happy Thoughts, 2nd edn, London: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
Close   View the register entry >>


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Issue 1480 (20 November 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 197.

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Railway Compensation

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents, Crime, Government


Punch,  57 (1869), 197.

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A Card from the Isle of Africa

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exploration, Discovery

People mentioned:

Richard F Burton Burton, Sir Richard Francis (1821–90) ODNB
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    Begins by presenting the compliments of Father Nile to Mr Punch for the 'delightful way in which that gentleman depicted saucy Miss Britannia discovering the Father among his rushes' (see John Tenniel, 'Britannia Discovering the Source of the Nile', Punch, 44 (1863), [233]). Father Nile also wishes to inform Mr Punch that, at the suggestion of David Livingstone Livingstone, David (1813–73) ODNB
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, he has 'removed his head-quarters' to a region 'a few degrees south of the Equator'. This refers to Livingstone's recent claims regarding the source of the river.



Punch,  57 (1869), 197.

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Good Chemical Preparation for Over-Beaten Bullocks

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Chemistry, Medical Treatment, Pharmaceuticals, Animal Husbandry


    'Ox-hide of Iron'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 198.

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Fashionable Suicide

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Death, Statistics, Gender, Amusement, Disease


    Discusses a report that female mortality in Paris has dropped since stays went out of fashion, but that chignons have 'increased brain-fever nearly seventy-three per cent'. Warns that small waists and large chignons, still fashionable in London, are forms of 'fashionable suicide'. Laments that women suffer in order to 'look killing' and presents an extract describing the gruesome sources of hair used in chignons which Punch thinks explains why this fashion accessory causes brain-fever.



Punch,  57 (1869), 198.

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Bumble Defying the Thunder (Dedicated Without Respect to the Majority of the St. Pancras St Pancras Poor Law Union
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Board of Guardians)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Health, Disease, Sanitation, Nutrition, Pollution, Industry, Controversy, Periodicals, Hospitals, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Education, Schools, Government, Politics


    Written from the perspective of a disreputable St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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guardian, this poem begins by questioning the calls by newspapers and doctors to 'Give paupers full allowance of air'. Points out that paupers do not know 'any differ' from 'stenches and stiflin'' and that they do not have the noses and feet to smell and feel their terrible conditions. Defends the decision of St Pancras guardians to provide paupers with a 'short allowance' of food, drink and air, insisting that 'the more of 'em we gets rid of / The lighter we makes the rate'. Notes that Samuel Solly Solly, Samuel (1805–71) ODNB
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has testified to the 'stinks' in the workhouse but insists that it would be folly to follow Solly's advice because 'a vurk-'us must smell like a vurk-'us'. Similarly, ridicules the diseases suffered by paupers on the grounds that 'they're a nasty, sarcy, / Discontented, pampered lot'. Criticises the chief opponents of St Pancras poor-law guardians—including 'our doctors and nusses', 'the Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, Punch Punch (1841–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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and the Pall Mall Gazette Pall Mall Gazette (1865–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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—and scorns the Poor Law Board Poor Law Board
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for urging St Pancras guardians to 'spend rates on sick wards and schools'. Concludes by denying that the guardians are a 'public scandal', and by resolving to 'keep rates and paupers down', and to impeach George J Goschen Goschen, George Joachim, 1st Viscount Goschen (1831–1907) ODNB
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(the President of the Poor Law Board) for his attacks on them.



Punch,  57 (1869), 199.

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An Electric Lesson

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Drama

Subjects:

Telegraphs, Language, Domestic Economy


    Begins by anticipating the 'new system of Telegraphs' that will shortly 'come into play'—a reference to the government purchase of Britain's land telegraphs, which lowered the cost of sending telegrams. Expects 'every Man and Woman to do his or her Duty' and to understand that with telegrams costing 'Twenty Words for a shilling', they will have to 'study the art of condensation of language'. Appreciating the difficulty that 'many worthy people' have in condensing their messages, Mr Punch thinks 'these long evenings' can be 'profitably spent in acquiring Electric Literature', and presents a short drama in which a family discuss ways of shortening messages.



Punch,  57 (1869), 203.

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News from the Nile's Head

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Discovery, Race


    Emphasises the truth of Roderick I Murchison's Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet (1792–1871) DSBODNB
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claim that David Livingstone Livingstone, David (1813–73) ODNB
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is safe, a claim opposing the view of 'lying natives' who said the explorer was 'stone dead'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 206.

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"Name! Name!"

Epicurus Rotundus Rotundus, Epicurus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Exploration, Physical Geography, Discovery, Language


    Praising a recent petition, in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, for the recognition of Richard F Burton Burton, Sir Richard Francis (1821–90) ODNB
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as the discoverer of Lake Tanganyika (a petition signed by Isabel Burton Burton, Isabel, Lady (1831–96) ODNB
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), the letter-writer complains that the 'barbarous names given by savages' to geographical locations are beyond his spelling ability, and he calls for a new system of nomenclature (for example, calling 'Lake Nyanza Lake SPEKE Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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-GRANT Grant, James Augustus (1827–92) ODNB
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', and the Nile-source, Lake LIVINGSTONE Livingstone, David (1813–73) ODNB
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) that would make spelling easier and would stop the 'injustice' done to Burton.



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Issue 1481 (27 November 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 208.

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The St. Pancras Odour of Sanctity

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Crime, Death, Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Pollution, Sanitation, Medical Practitioners, Expertise, Hospitals


    Discusses a recent inquest held by Edwin Lankester Lankester, Edwin (1814–74) ODNB
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into the death of a pauper who died at the infirmary of the notorious St Pancras Poor Law Union Workhouse St Pancras Poor Law Union Workhouse
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. Presents an extract from the evidence given by the St Thomas's Hospital St Thomas's Hospital
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surgeon Samuel Solly Solly, Samuel (1805–71) ODNB
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who considered the workhouse to be one of the foulest places he had ever inspected and that the foul stench pervading the building was due to poor ventilation. Surprised to learn that a coroner's jury 'believed this disposition' and declared that the pauper had died from consumption accelerated by poor ventilation. Suggests that this verdict owed much to the supporting testimony of Robert B Carter Carter, Robert Brudenell (1828–1918) WBI
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, but points out that if the jurors had 'yielded to the impulse of their parochial feelings' they would have discarded the evidence of two distinguished medical men. Adds that this verdict will 'persuade the public' that the St Pancras guardians are wrong to complain of Lankester's relentless inquests into their paupers.



Punch,  57 (1869), 208.

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How to Improve the Cattle Trade

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Cruelty, Transport


    'Improve the Cattle-Truck'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 209.

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Boards of a Feather

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Disease, Class, Sanitation, Pollution, Health, Hospitals


    Notes that the guardians of the Holborn Poor Law Union Holborn Poor Law Union
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have 'run away' from the scarlatina which is in 'full swing' in the neighbourhood of their Clerkenwell workhouse Holborn Poor Law Union—Workhouse
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. Notes that the Pall Mall Gazette Pall Mall Gazette (1865–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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has accused the guardians of 'cowardice' and ironically asks whether that periodical has considered whether the guardians could meet in a workhouse which is only a place 'for paupers to live and die in'—an overcrowded 'fever-nest'. Concludes by noting that the Holborn and St Pancras St Pancras Poor Law Union
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unions would celebrate each other's infirmaries and share such common enemies as Punch Punch (1841–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, the doctors, and the Poor Law Board Poor Law Board
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.



Punch,  57 (1869), 209.

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Where the St. Pancras Guardians Expect Dr Ellis Ellis, Dr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/21/4
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to Go to

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Health, Sanitation, Hospitals, Medical Practitioners

Institutions mentioned:

St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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    'Not the Elysian fields—quite the reverse'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 210.

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Rule Britannia or No?

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Periodicals

People mentioned:

Ferdinand, vicomte de Lesseps Lesseps, Ferdinand, vicomte de (1805–94) CBD
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Institutions mentioned:

Suez Canal Suez Canal
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Punch,  57 (1869), 210.

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Palmam qui Meruit Ferat

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Periodicals

People mentioned:

Ferdinand, vicomte de Lesseps Lesseps, Ferdinand, vicomte de (1805–94) CBD
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Institutions mentioned:

Suez Canal Suez Canal
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Punch,  57 (1869), 210.

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Illustration of "Sweetness and Light" (for a Pictorial Edition of MATTHEW ARNOLD Arnold, Matthew (1822–88) ODNB
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)

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Health, Sanitation, Hospitals, Medical Practitioners

Institutions mentioned:

St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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Punch,  57 (1869), [212]–[213].

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From the Great Pyramid. (A Bird's-Eye View of the Canal Suez Canal
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and its Consequences)

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Engineering, War, Politics, Internationalism


    Shows Britannia and a number of European leaders (including Otto E L von Bismarck (Count of Bismarck-Schönhausen) Bismarck, Prince Otto Edward Leopold von, Duke of Lauenburg (1815–98) CBD
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and Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France) standing on top of the Great Pyramid of Giza Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt
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and contemplating the scene. The allegorical figure of France turns to Britannia and remarks 'See what it unites!', but the sceptical Britannia replies, 'Think what it may divide!'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 215.

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To My Beloved Vesta

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Zoology, Cell Biology, Evolution, Animal Development, Darwinism, Chemistry, Science Communication, Gender


    Written from the perspective of a bachelor 'Pensive Protoplasm' who tells his beloved Vesta of his birth in 'some pre-historic chasm', and that he and she are nothing more than hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen. He also reminds her that animacules, lizard's eggs, and other creatures in 'stagnant water' are their siblings, and that she should not turn her 'coquettish head aside' from ancestors who are nothing to 'boast about'. He tries to console her by explaining that philosophers agree that the origin of protoplasm is 'outside their trade', and concludes by asking her to join their 'protoplasmic bands' in 'Hymen's bands' and spend their 'gay organic life' as husband and wife.



Punch,  57 (1869), 216.

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Frustrate their Knavish Tricks

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Politics, Imperialism

Institutions mentioned:

Suez Canal Suez Canal
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Punch,  57 (1869), 217.

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A Word for Architects

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Engineering, Architecture, Metallurgy, Chemistry, Charlatanry


    Notes that Holborn Viaduct Holborn Viaduct
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is 'pronounced to be safe' despite cracks in its metal columns. Attempts to explain the oversight of the bridge's architect, William Haywood Haywood, William (1821–94) ODNB
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, who, according to Punch, was not expected to know of the effect of atmospheric changes on metal. Notes that 'many years ago every real architect had a book full of pictures' of iron structures which, when cool, 'exercised a tremendous pressure, and held up the walls'. Concludes by suggesting that in 1869 an architect should have known such elementary principles.



Punch,  57 (1869), 217.

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The Right Man in the Right Place

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Health, Sanitation, Hospitals, Medical Practitioners

Institutions mentioned:

St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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Punch,  57 (1869), 218.

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T' Other Way

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Health, Sanitation, Hospitals, Medical Practitioners


    Ridicules news that the guardians of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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gave, as the reason for asking the Poor Law Board Poor Law Board
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to dismiss their medical officer Dr Ellis Ellis, Dr (fl. 1869) PU1/57/21/4
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, that they could not work in harmony with him even if he acted in good faith. Thinks this is a good reason to dismiss the guardians rather than the medical officer.



Punch,  57 (1869), 218.

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"Bogie Carriages"

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Transport, Accidents, Language, Supernaturalism


    Speculates on the nature of the apparently ghastly-sounding bogie carriages recommended for the railways. Given that accidents on railways are 'tolerably frequent', asks 'who knows what might happen to so ghastly a conveyance?'. Suggests that 'fogey' would be a better name than 'bogey', and would certainly appeal more to 'nervous' people.



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Issue 1482 (4 December 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 220.

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A Lady's Protest

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Darwinism, Evolution


Punch,  57 (1869), 221.

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Lumbricus Cæsariei

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Communication, Cultural Geography, Medical Treatment

People mentioned:

Thomas Holloway Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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    Reflects on the effects of 'larger international communication' on the attitudes of Frenchmen, notably the fact that their commercial announcements are more assertive and confident than before. Illustrates this by an advertisement in the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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from a French trader puffing his cure for baldness.



Punch,  57 (1869), 225.

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Those "Blessed Candles!"

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Religion, Light, Technology


Punch,  57 (1869), 225.

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An Event Anticipated

Anon

Genre:

Literary Announcement

Subjects:

Natural Law, Philosophy

Publications cited:

Campbell 1867 Campbell, George Douglas, 8th Duke of Argyll 1867. The Reign of Law, London: Alexander Strahan
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Punch,  57 (1869), 226.

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Pleasantries for St. Pancras

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Death, Disease, Health, Hospitals, Controversy, Morality


    Explains that while Edwin Lankester Lankester, Edwin (1814–74) ODNB
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'may sit' on the paupers of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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, ratepayers and guardians 'are not to be sat upon', judging by a recent meeting at which the chairman of the union upheld its satisfactory condition and considered damaging reports on the workhouse infirmary to have been 'got up for party purposes'. Discusses the remarks of a St Pancras guardian who objected to the methods and cost of inquests into pauper deaths in the workhouse. Believes that the moral of the meeting was that the present regime should be praised for saving ratepayer's money, which Punch does not consider moral at all.



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Issue 1483 (11 December 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 229.

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"I'll Have Yer Hat!"

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

L S Sambourne, Edwin Linley (1844–1910) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Zoological Gardens, Zoology, Animal Behaviour


    Shows a scene at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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. A crowd looks at a bear that has climbed up a long pole, and laughs because the bear has stolen, and subsequently ruined, the hat of a gentleman onlooker. The caption states that, as the phrase of the title 'is used only by the inferior creation, Mr. Punch is glad to illustrate it so appropriately'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 230.

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An American Notion

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Transport, Supernaturalism

Institutions mentioned:

Erie Railroad Erie Railroad
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Punch,  57 (1869), 231.

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Larks in Season

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour, Hunting


    Notes a communication from Francis O Morris Morris, Francis Orpen (1810–93) ODNB
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to The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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on the capture, on British shores, of the rare 'Shore Lark' (Morris 1869 Morris, Francis Orpen 1869. 'On the Shore Lark', The Times, 25 November, p. 11
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). Points out that the 'Bipes implumis', the mudlark, is also common to these shores.



Punch,  57 (1869), 232.

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Punch on Thwaites

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Government, Politics, Sanitation, Pollution, Engineering, Disease, Utilitarianism, Charlatanry, Scientific Practitioners, Expertise, Morality


    Begins by asking the chairman of the Metropolitan Board of Works Metropolitan Board of Works
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, John Thwaites Thwaites, Sir John (1815–1870) ODNB
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, to 'Cease paeans to raise in Self-Government's praise' (a reference to a recent speech given by Thwaites) until he has 'lowered our rates, / Settled sewers, embankments, and thoroughfares'. Points out that the public thinks that rogues sit on the board and criticises Thwaites for the fact that the Thames Embankment Thames Embankment
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is 'still blocked', 'Father Thames is still poisoned with your sewage' and that vestrymen 'leave fever to stalk / Through pestilent court and foul alley'. Attacks the board for allowing paupers at the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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to die 'In foul wards where fever-germs fester', and laments the fact that humanity is 'sneered at', science is 'snubbed', and 'they that expose workhouse horrors are dubbed / Lying rogues'. Urges Thwaites not to praise self-government, which Punch considers 'A nuisance'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 237.

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Another Pancras Witness

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Sanitation, Controversy, Hospitals


    Noting the 'testimonials' to character which the guardians of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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have published, points out that 'the public laugh at them'. Presents an extract from one dubious testimonial written by an author of limited literary ability who insists that their Workhouse St Pancras Poor Law Union Workhouse
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is 'Scripilis clane' and that the patients have no 'Complaintes'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 237.

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The British Farmer to the Board of Trade Board of Trade
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(As Personified in its President Bright, John (1811–89) ODNB
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)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Agriculture, Statistics


Punch,  57 (1869), 238.

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Wanted a Ghost!

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Societies, Experiment, Charlatanry, Supernaturalism, Force, Electricity


    Begins with an extract telling 'Proprietors of Haunted Houses' that a few gentlemen wish to visit such houses near London 'for the purpose of scientific investigation'. This extract and the following poem refer to the decision by the London Dialectical Society London Dialectical Society
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to launch a committee to investigate spiritualism. The poem describes various ghostly phenomena for the committee to pursue. These include ghosts 'of whatever variety' that can 'mingle in learned society' and 'work on the feelings electric / Of savans devoted to themes dialectic'; haunted houses full of 'Bells autophonic and creakiest boards', goblins 'from 't'other side Jordan to roam', demons who will explain the power that 'keeps airy DANIEL Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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' and 'elongates his braces', the 'merits / That make Mrs. Marshall Marshall, Mary Anne (1842–84) WBI
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affected by "sperrits"'. Suggests that 'in this age of inquiry', these 'pseudo-philosophers' want to 'daunt' 'old ladies and children', as well as galvanising 'once and again / All the exploded old tricks of Cock Lane' and calling 'a white sheet and post [...] a genuine ghost'.



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Issue 1484 (18 December 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 240.

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The Sultan's Abd-ul-Aziz, Sultan of Turkey (1830–76) CBD
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Complaint

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Engineering, Imperialism

People mentioned:

Ismail Pasha (Khedive of Egypt) Ismail Pasha, Khedive of Egypt (1830–95) CBD
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Institutions mentioned:

Suez Canal Suez Canal
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Punch,  57 (1869), 240.

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A Bark from Beadledom

Bow-Wow! Bow-Wow!
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Disease, Death, Crime, Medical Practitioners, Hospitals

People mentioned:

Samuel Solly Solly, Samuel (1805–71) ODNB
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    Begins by relishing the fact that the 'Press is powerless to influence the iron will' of the guardians of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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. Draws attention to the report of Edwin Lankester's Lankester, Edwin (1814–74) ODNB
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inquest held into the death of a pauper at the Workhouse St Pancras Poor Law Union Workhouse
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, in which the coroner's jury agreed that the death was 'aggravated by the impure air of the infirmary'. Defiantly points out that the guardians are 'not going to be put down' by Lankester or the coroner's court, and that they can 'dismiss whomsoever they can'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 247.

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New Curiosities of Literature

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Publishing, Political Economy, Vaccination, Hunting

Publications cited:

Smith 1776, Smith, Adam 1776. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 2 vols, London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell
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Walton 1653 Walton, Isaak 1653. The Compleat Angler; or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation. Being a Discourse of Fish and Fishing, Not Unworthy the Perusal of Most Anglers [...] London: Richard Marriot
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Punch,  57 (1869), 248.

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The Sensibility of Savages

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Representation, Steam-power, Telegraphy, Photography, Progress, Crime


Punch,  57 (1869), 250.

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Punch's Rules for Young Tradesmen (After the Well-Known Advice by SIR RICHARD PHILLIPS Phillips, Sir Richard (1767–1840) ODNB
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, to be Found in MAVOR'S Mavor, William Fordyce (1758–1837) ODNB
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Spelling-book)

Anon

Genre:

Instructions, Spoof

Subjects:

Commerce, Charlatanry, Crime, Adulteration, Analytical Chemistry


    Includes advice on adulteration of goods, stressing that the author assumes tradesmen to know their business and those who teach it to them, and advises those 'tradesmen who sell articles of consumption' to read DR. HASSALL'S Hassall, Arthur Hill (1817–94) ODNB
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book' (a reference to Hassall 1857 Hassall, Arthur Hill 1857. Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine, London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts
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), because 'His exposures will be their instructions'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 250.

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Tobacco for Teetotallers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Narcotics, Medical Treatment, Health, Disease


    Discusses an extract from an article by a 'Calcutta writer' who, having read that watercress is an antidote to nicotine, tried smoking dried watercress leaves and found that it 'had all the flavour of the best Cavendish without the treacle'. Believes this is good news for teetotallers because they believe smoking induces 'alcoholic tendencies' but will probably indulge in watercress smoking.


See also:

One in the Clouds, 'Tobacco and its Antidote', Punch, 57 (1869), 168


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Issue 1485 (25 December 1869)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 251.

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An Instructive Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Animal Husbandry, Utilitarianism, Class, Nutrition, Disease, Hospitals, Sanitation


    Reports that 'certain Vestrymen and [poor-law] Guardians' are preparing a show of 'poor lean' paupers similar to the 'annual Fat Cattle Show Smithfield Club—Cattle Show
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', in which 'Bumbles' are given prizes for being 'the biggest brutes' in their 'treatment of these creatures'. Adds that prizes will also be awarded to paupers who can 'live upon the smallest nutriment' and cause their parish 'least expense', and to the 'legal representatives of paupers' who are 'starved nigh to death's door' and do not complain about being removed to a filthy sick ward. Like cattle, the pauper's age and weight will be 'posted at his back' as well as his 'diet and cost'. Also suggests that, like a cattle show, the pauper exhibition will include displays of 'implements and models' including the handiwork of vestrymen, 'comprising frothy, foolish claptrap, bunkum speeches'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 251.

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Barking the Blest

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Government, Politics, Pollution, Sanitation


    This poem attacks the evils of self-government, by comparing Barking, the northern outfall of the London sewerage system, to 'an Elysium'. Describes the rich 'odours' that emanate from the basin into which the drains flow, the 'savoury London muck' brought to Barking station by barges, and the fact that the smells and sights are so bad that 'Barking causeth biting / To eyes and nose also!'. Explains that the town, including its cesspools and roads, is 'self-governed', the cesspools being 'left to clean themselves'. Suggests that London would be poisoned if it were to emulate the self-government of Barking, and warns that Barking could wreak its 'vengeance' on London 'By sending down its sewage / To the mouth of Barking Creek'. Imagines that Barking would be a 'Paradise' for a guardian of the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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who would consider the stench of Barking to rival that of his 'ward'. Concludes by ironically suggesting that Barking represents the ideal of 'unfettered / Self-Government' that 'London ought to be'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 252.

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A Christmas Nursery Carol

Anon

Genre:

Song

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Nutrition

Institutions mentioned:

St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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Punch,  57 (1869), 253.

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American Bangers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Hospitals, Pollution, Sanitation, Military Technology

Institutions mentioned:

St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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Punch,  57 (1869), 253.

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A Teacher at Sion College Sion College
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Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Religious Authority, Health


    Begins by pointing out that the Poor Law Board Poor Law Board
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stipulates that poor-law authorities can only administer 'a minimum of relief' in order to keep paupers alive. Proceeds to discuss a report in the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of a recent meeting at Sion College Sion College
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convened to discuss the need to check the 'increase of pauperism and [to] improve the condition of the deserving poor'. Notes that the President of the Poor Law Board, George J Goschen Goschen, George Joachim, 1st Viscount Goschen (1831–1907) ODNB
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supported the poor law on the question of pauper relief, and agrees with the Morning Post that sick paupers should be helped to recover and then enabled to earn a livelihood.



Punch,  57 (1869), 254.

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A Royal Example

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Hunting, Cruelty, Class, Military Technology


Punch,  57 (1869), 254.

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[Punch's Almanack Punch's Almanack (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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]

Anon

Genre:

Literary Notice, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Periodicals

Institutions mentioned:

Suez Canal Suez Canal
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Punch,  57 (1869), [255].

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Penance for Pancras Guardians

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Class, Human Development, Nutrition


    Shows the Christmas dinner given to paupers at the St Pancras Poor Law Union St Pancras Poor Law Union
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. In the foreground, Mr Punch cuts slices of a gigantic Christmas pudding, while next to him (in a stark reversal of their usual uncaring role), poor-law guardians fall to their knees and hand plates of pudding to rows of seated (and thankful) paupers. In the spirit of Christmas, the windows and walls of the room are decorated with wreaths, a Mr Punch puppet, and toy windmills.



Punch,  57 (1869), 258.

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Testimonium Protest-antis (After Reading the Interview of the Oxford University of Oxford
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and Cambridge University of Cambridge
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Deputations for the Abolition of Tests, with MR. GLADSTONE Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Religion, Politics, Controversy, Religious Authority, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Quackery, Charlatanry


    Written from the perspective of an irate defender of religious tests, this describes some of the intellectuals who 'are the Promoters / Of this Godless movement, / To lift the Universities / Out of their old grooves', including Benjamin Jowett Jowett, Benjamin (1817–93) ODNB
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who is considered 'an irrational / Rationalist sheep-biter', John F D Maurice Maurice, John Frederick Denison (1805–72) ODNB
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'a sensational / Hazy, crazy writer', George Rolleston Rolleston, George (1829–81) DSB
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'a Materia—/ Medica—listic squabbler', and Charles Kingsley Kingsley, Charles (1819–75) ODNB
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'a sciolist, / And Socialist rowdy rollick-us'.



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Issue 1486 (1 January 1870)Expand    Contract

Punch,  57 (1869), 261.

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Meteorological Memoranda

Parry Plwee Plwee, Parry
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Meteorology, Time, Measurement


    The author intends to write to the meteorologist John R Hind Hind, John Russell (1823–95) DSB
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about 'Meteorological matters', including his proposal to rearrange and double the months of the year. He ridicules the claim that the moon has an effect on the 'arbitrary division' of the months, and asks for 'a little more summer, and just so much mild winter as will be beneficial to the poor sportsmen'. Concludes by announcing that he is 'ready to receive subscriptions' to further the prospect of his 'Scientific Committee for the Re-arrangement of the Year'.



Punch,  57 (1869), 261.

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A Severe State Surgeon

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Political Economy, Politics, Government, Anaesthesia, Medical Treatment


Punch,  57 (1869), 261.

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Those Democratic Railroads

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Railways, Transport, Engineering, Politics


Punch,  57 (1869), 262.

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Skittles

A Plebeian Plebeian, A
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Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Astrology, Prognostication

People mentioned:

[Richard J Morrison] Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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Punch,  57 (1869), 262.

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The Monarch Monarch, ship
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>, H.B.M. Ship of War, and the Plymouth USS Plymouth
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, U.S.N. Corvette, Sail with the Body of George Peabody Peabody, George (1795–1869) ODNB
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Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Military Technology, Steamships, Heroism, Commerce


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