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The Youth's Magazine; or, Evangelical Miscellany [3rd]  Introduction
Volume 4  (January to December 1831)
Issue [1] (January 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 2–12.

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A Noble Spirit  [1/2]

S S S S, S S
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Genre:

Short Fiction, Serial

Subjects:

Mathematics, Human Species, Materialism, Morality, Religion


    The introduction recounts the promise of Mr. Hanmer to write to the 'two intelligent sons', Charles and Horace, of his friend Sir Edward Brackenbury, concerning his early ideas and experiences of what constitutes 'a noble spirit' (3). In his letter, Hanmer describes his early companions at a banking house in London. One is unable to manage his financial affairs: he says that 'he never had any thing fixed within him or about him: and arithmetical calculations are such fixed things, that the bare thought of living and acting by them, destroys him with the vapours' (7). Another, Langley, spends his evenings 'engaged in the most interesting philosophical inquiries; investigating, especially, the nature and character of man, in a manner calculated to render him happier and wiser'. He and his associates believe in the inherent goodness of the human species, and the sufficiency of reason, and discuss such questions as 'whether matter be under the control of the mind, or mind owes its impressions to matter'. (8) Langley becomes increasingly depraved as a result of his principles. Drawing out the moral of this tale, Hanmer advises his young friends at some length to beware of the 'pride of human intellect', although he also advises them not to 'abstain from science and learning', noting that 'reason is a useful servant to religion' (12).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 23–27.

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Satire Dissected

Annette Annette
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Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Dissection


    The father of a family corrects the tendency to critical and satirical remarks in his children. In 'justification' of the title, the narrator begins by introducing the readers 'to the family group in which the operation of dissection was performed', seated in a warm parlour on a winter's evening (23).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 28–31.

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Dew Drops Anon. 1831. Dew Drops, London: Religious Tract Society
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. New Year's Day

R C, pseud.  [Richard Cope] Cope, Richard (1776–1856) ODNB
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Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Reading, Piety, Botany, Biblical Authority, Astronomy


    A footnote recommends under the name of Dew Drops Anon. 1831. Dew Drops, London: Religious Tract Society
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'a very neat small selection of texts for every day, published by the Religious Tract Society Religious Tract Society
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'. Charlotte discusses with her mother the meaning of 'Dew Drop', the title of the 'beautiful little book' which her father has given her. Mrs. Williams expresses the hope that her daughter will 'examine this Dew Drop, and let it distil into [her] mind, like the dew on the flowers, that it may nourish and refresh [her], and make [her] fruitful in the ways of God'. She also observes: 'The whole word of God is presented for your observation and reflection, like the vast firmament thickly bespangled with stars, which constantly employs the thoughts and meditations of the astronomer, who avails himself of the powers of his long telescope, to render his knowledge of the heavenly bodies more complete'. (28)



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Issue [2] (February 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 60–62.

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The Infant School

A C C, A
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Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Physiognomy


    The narrator describes a visit to a village infant school, and observes: 'I was met by the schoolmistress, of whom, without having deeply studied Lavater Lavater, Johann Kaspar (1741–1801) CBD
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, I could immediately believe that she was well qualified for the task she had undertaken' (60).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 64–65.

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Reasons for Believing the Bible to be the Word of God

Tutor Tutor
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Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Biblical Authority, Natural Theology


    The writer introduces a list of reasons and recommends that they be committed to memory. The list begins: '1. Because what we learn from the natural world of the existence, power, wisdom, and goodness of God, agrees with what the Bible states of them. 2. Because a book like the Bible was much needed to make the will of God more clearly known to man, than nature alone could do' (64).



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Issue [3] (March 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 91–93.

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Natural Objects for March

Anon

Genre:

Extract, Miscellaneous

Publications extracted:

Roberts 1831 [Roberts, Mary] 1831. The Annals of My Village: Being a Calendar of Nature, for Every Month in the Year, London: J. Hatchard and Son
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Subjects:

Natural History, Anthropomorphism, Natural Economy, Class, Theology of Nature, Design, Piety, Gender, Error


    Referring to the appearance in the natural world of 'myriads of happy beings' at the end of February, the writer cites the account of the 'joy' and 'exultation' of insects given in William Paley's Paley, William (1743–1805) DSB
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Natural Theology Paley, William 1802. Natural Theology; or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity: Collected from the Appearances of Nature, [London]: R. Faulder
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(91). References to the place of insects in the scale of nature imply a message of social resignation: 'Every winged insect is perhaps equally intent upon its proper employment, and under every variety of constitution is equally gratified with the occupation which its kind Creator has assigned it. [...] The Deity appoints them a subordinate office, but he has mercifully blended with it so much enjoyment, that one species never intrudes upon the province of another'. The mole is one of 'the commoners of nature', and 'though his eyes are small, and his vision imperfect, maternal nature has bestowed on him by way of recompense a placid contentedness of temper'. (92) The writer denounces the view that hedgehogs live 'by milking the cows and goats' (93).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 102.

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Scripture Illustrations

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Extract

Publications extracted:

Belzoni 1820 Belzoni, Giovanni Battista 1820. Narrative of the Operations and Recent Discoveries Within the Pyramids, Temples, Tombs, and Excavations, in Egypt and Nubia: And of a Journey to the Coast of the Red Sea, in Search of the Ancient Berenice; and Another to the Oasis of Jupiter Ammon, London: John Murray
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Subjects:

Entomology, Biblical Authority


    Describes swarms of locusts to illustrate the text Mark 1. 16.



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Issue [4] (April 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 124–28.

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Remarkable Anecdote of a Sparrow

G Wells, Lambeth Wells, G (of Deptford) (fl. 1831) YM3/4/4/1
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Genre:

Anecdote

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour, Anthropomorphism, Menageries


    Introduces the anecdote by noting that the 'common sparrow is a species of bird which commands the least attention', but that 'after the perusal of the following anecdote, it may ever be looked upon with admiration' (124). The anecdote concerns a sparrow which was used to solicit alms from Anne C Helvétius Helvétius (née de Ligniville d'Autricourt), Anne Catherine (1719–1800) WBI
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. Describes her 'singular attachment to birds', the 'large aviary' at her country residence, and her knowledge of the subject.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 137.

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The Nautilus

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Invertebrate Zoology


    Gives a brief description of the nautilus shown in the illustration.



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Issue [5] (May 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 172–74.

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Evils of Idleness. Charles Lifeless.—A Sketch

R C, pseud.  [Richard Cope] Cope, Richard (1776–1856) ODNB
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Genre:

Introduction; Short Fiction

Subjects:

Endeavour, Mathematics, Reasoning, Religion


    Reflects on the dangers of idleness, and recommends that readers 'cultivate the talents with which God has entrusted them' and avail themselves of 'the ample opportunities around them, for adding constantly to their stock of learning and knowledge'. Considers history and mathematics to be particularly suitable subjects for study: 'What rich stores of science invite their attention! [...] How greatly may their mental powers be enlarged by mathematical pursuits!'. (173)



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 174–76.

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Letter to the Readers of the Youth's Magazine Youth's Magazine (1805–67) Waterloo Directory
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G B W W, G B
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Genre:

Letter

Subjects:

Education, Imperialism, Superstition, Christianity, Instruments


    The writer is pleased by the 'pecuniary assistance' which the 'conductors' of the magazine have been able to 'render to the education of the young in foreign lands', and rejoices 'in the announcement on the cover for the present month, that donations have been made to the schools connected with our Missions'. Expresses a hope that 'many will come forth from the missionary schools to tell to their deluded countrymen the interesting truths which have affected their own hearts'. (174) Gives details of the benevolent institution Calcutta. benevolent institution
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in Calcutta, a school run by Mr Penney Penney, Mr (fl. 1831) YM3/4/5/2
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, 'one of the missionaries sent out by the Baptist Missionary Society Baptist Missionary Society
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'. Reports that everything the children are are taught 'is opposed to their own superstitions. It would be entertaining if I were to repeat to you a few observations, lately made, on receiving a pair of globes, and a microscope, sent out from England, which it is hoped will be useful, not only in aiding their general instruction, but in enabling them to see more clearly that the heathen system is a delusion'. (175)



Section: Poetry

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 177–78.

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Death Welcome to the Believer

J S Harvey Harvey, J S (fl. 1831) YM3/4/5a/3
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Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Christianity, Death, Immortality, Epidemiology, Pollution, Disease


    The poet reflects on the miseries of the mortal life, including the 'tainted and infectious atmosphere' (177), and the horror of watching loved ones 'Diseas'd in body, or distress'd in mind' (178).



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Issue [6] (June 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 198–204.

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The Principle of Repulsion

S S S S, S S
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Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Heat, Dynamics, Controversy, Morality, Disease


    Augusta Sidney and her brother Alfred are having an argument about whether heat is 'the universal principle of repulsion', which Augusta claims is what Alfred's tutor taught them in a lecture the previous night. Alfred argues that sometimes repulsion is due to other causes, explaining that while 'heat, in expanding bodies, must increase the distance between their particles, the very same thing takes place in the act of freezing, where cold is the agent'. Augusta becomes heated, and asks her father: 'Papa, is not heat the principle of repulsion, is it not a repellant?'. (198) Her father suggests that her 'intemperate heat' is in danger of repelling her friends, and, when she protests heatedly, sends her to her room (199). She is penitent, and her father rejoices to see broken 'those swelling tumours, which so often destroy the health of [her] soul' (202). He tells her that she was 'so far right' in her opinion of natural heat that under different circumstances he would have 'commended her attention'. He explains that the 'the general effect of heat is to produce extension' , and that 'some writers use the terms heat and calorific repulsion as synonymous', but continues that Alfred was right in observing that the power of repulsion also exists in other causes, and reports that heat 'sometimes possesses a contrary quality'. (203)



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 207–09.

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On Youth. No. II  [2/2]

B R R, B
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Genre:

Essay, Serial

Subjects:

Time, Immortality, Matter Theory


    Illustrating 'the endless duration of eternity', the writer quotes the lines: 'As many years as atoms in the air, / When these are done, as many to ensue' (208).



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Issue [7] (July 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 226–28.

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The Study of Nature

N H S S, N H
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W K F F, W K
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Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Aesthetics, Amusement, Feeling, Piety, Design, Theology of Nature, Human Species, Eschatology


    'A taste for the beauties of nature highly conduces to a genuine and refined enjoyment'. However, for the Christian, as opposed to 'he who is of the world', there is the added advantage that they are calculated to 'draw forth sentiments of love and adoration' towards the creator. Unlike human art, where a more cultivated sense magnifies the defects, the student of nature is only the more aware of the perfections of divine art. 'What to others may seem something like a blot on the fair proportions of creation, He, by a sort of moral alchymy converts to a beauty'. 'All the works of nature are perfect, because they are the works of God'; thus, the study of nature is a wholly pure pursuit. (226) 'There is something well suited to the nature of man in the study of nature; something akin to the living principle within him that seeks for aliment, unsullied by any of the defilement that necessarily attaches itself to whatever is of man'. This thirst relates to the 'primeval purity' of the human soul. Contrasts 'human science' unfavourably with the 'study of human nature': 'That raises to distinction among men—this confers happiness; that may employ the mind, the mere reasoning faculty—this is the science for the soul; the heir of immortality; the spark of divinity that glows within us'. (227) Imagines the purification of the world as the 'new creation', and speculates about 'the spirits of the just made perfect' visiting it and 'the book of nature' being 'opened to their perusal' (227–28). Concludes that the study of nature harmonizes our ideas 'with those of the seraph hosts, from whose intellect all darkness is removed' (228).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 229–30.

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The Human Heart

Anon

Genre:

Extract, Miscellaneous

Publications extracted:

Paxton 1831–34 Paxton, James 1831–34. An Introduction to the Study of Human Anatomy, 2 vols, London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper
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Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Anatomy, Physiology


    Describes the structure and function of the heart, using a keyed diagram.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 230–38.

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Second Causes

S S S S, S S
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Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Causation, Disease, Providence


    Charles Athelstone blames himself and his sister for exposing his friend, Henry, to typhus fever, since it occurred as an unintended result of their virtuous actions. Their mother observes that 'it depends very much on the state of his constitution, whether he may have taken the complaint; and, above all, it depends on the will of Him, whose superintending Providence orders all events' (232). She admonishes Charles: 'You judge of actions, not by their real nature, but from some consequences quite foreign [....] And, with similar inconsistency, you acknowledge all things to be under the controlling influence of a Being, "infinite in wisdom, power, and love," and yet keep your eye so fixed on second causes, as to be wretched when they turn out contrary to your desires' (233). Mrs Athelstone suggests that her son pray for his friend, and rest assured of divine providence. A brief note at the end of the tale records that 'the fears of Charles, respecting his friend, were not realized' (238).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 239–40.

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Biographical Sketches

ρ χ χ, ρ
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Genre:

Biography



[1] Euclid of Alexandria Euclid (fl. 295 BC) DSB
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, the Mathematician, Flourished, B.C. 277

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Ancient Authorities, Mathematics


[2] Epicurus Epicurus (341–270 BC) DSB
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, the Grecian Philosopher. B.C. 270

Subjects:

Scientific Practitioners, Ancient Authorities, Morality, Cosmology, Immorality, Infidelity


    Describes Epicurus as a man of great virtue, and his followers as having departed from his principles in their sensuality. 'According to some writers, their tenets were, that "the world was made by a fortuitous concourse of atoms; that there is no superintending Providence over human affairs; that the souls of men die with their bodies; that consequently there are neither rewards nor punishments after death; and that pleasure [...] is the supreme and only good"' (240).




Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 244–45.

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Early Devotedness to God

Rev. James Parsons Parsons, Rev James (fl. 1831) YM3/4/7/5
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Genre:

Homily

Subjects:

Piety, Discovery


    Observes that the greatest pleasures are in being 'consecrated to the Lord', and contrasts these with the vain joys of 'voluptuousness', 'avarice', 'ambition', 'fame', and 'science' (244). The writer claims to have sought happiness in all directions, but has found it only in the 'service of God'. 'Like the philosopher of old Archimedes (c. 287–212 BC) DSB
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, but in an application far more exalted, I can say,—"I have found it, I have found it!"'. (245)



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 246.

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The Walrus

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Natural History, Design


    'The hind feet of this enormous animal are constructed, like the feet of the fly and other animals that work against gravity, upon a mechanism that resembles cupping glasses, to enable it to adhere to the slippery rocks which it is obliged to climb' (246).



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Issue [8] (August 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 253–54.

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Face of the Sun and Moon

Anon

Genre:

Extract, Miscellaneous

Publications extracted:

Brougham 1826, Brougham, Henry Peter 1826. Objects, Advantages, and Pleasures of Science, Library of Useful Knowledge, London: [Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy]
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Curtis 1829 [Curtis, Thomas], ed. 1829. The London Encyclopaedia; or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art, Literature, and Practical Mechanics: Comprising a Popular View of the Present State of Knowledge, 22 vols, London: Thomas Tegg
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Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Astronomy


    A frontispiece to the number depicts views of the faces of the sun and moon, which are described in the extracts.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 275–76.

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The Right Auricle of the Heart

Anon

Genre:

Extract, Miscellaneous

Publications extracted:

Paxton 1831–34 Paxton, James 1831–34. An Introduction to the Study of Human Anatomy, 2 vols, London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper
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Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Anatomy


    Gives a detailed and prosaic account of the right auricle and ventricle.



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Issue [9] (September 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 290–95.

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The Well-Timed Fable; or, The Witty Made Wise

S S S S, S S
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Genre:

Short Fiction, Drollery; Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Natural History, Animal Behaviour, Anthropomorphism, Morality


    The tale centres on Edwardstone Hall, where Mr and Mrs Carrington are hosts during the Christmas vacation to a 'large party of youthful relatives' and their eldest son, Henry, who is a minister in a nearby town. Henry reads to the party a poem entitled 'The Sagacious Party', in which he draws attention to their judgmental behaviour. (290) The poem recounts at length a conversation overheard between a horse, a dog, a sheep, a cow, a rabbit, and a goat, criticizing birds for not behaving like the animals concerned.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 316.

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The Left Side of the Heart

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Anatomy


    Briefly and prosaically describes the structure of the left side of the heart, as it appears in the illustration.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 317.

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The Highest Mountain in the Known World

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Physical Geography, Geology, Palaeontology, Biblical Authority


    Briefly describes the Himalayas and Hindu Kush, claiming Dhaulagiri as the highest known peak. 'The skeletons of horses have been found, in these mountains, so far from the plains, that they never could have existed alive in such a situation. It is a curious fact in geology; and with many others of a similar nature, tends to confirm the inspired account of the universal deluge'.



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Issue [10] (October 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 326–32.

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Passive Duties

S S S S, S S
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Genre:

Short Fiction—Introduction; Letter; Afterword

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Expertise, Disease, Morality, Piety, Providence


    The introduction explains that Ellen Montague lost her mother just as she reached womanhood, and relied heavily on the counsel of Mrs Arnold, who was 'her senior by several years', and was 'married to a physician, at some distance from the metropolis where Ellen usually resided' (326). The letters between Ellen and Mrs Arnold chiefly focus on Ellen's disinclination to follow the advice of her medical attendants that she should rest. Dr Arnold, having made a visit to her while in London, has seconded the opinion of her own physician. Ellen, however, considers that she is doing wrong in neglecting 'present opportunities of doing good, in order to preserve a useless life for future service, to which, probably, I may never be called', and thinks Dr Arnold overestimates the importance of health (328). Mrs Arnold advises her that there are 'passive, as well as active duties', and under conditions of illness 'abundant opportunity is afforded to glorify God and benefit others, by our patient acquiescence in the Divine will, our holy cheerfulness in the midst of outward suffering'. Even more may be gained in terms of personal piety in the 'school of affliction'. (330)



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 339–45.

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Account of the Wreck of the Rothsay Castle Steam Packet Rothsay Castle, ship
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, in the Menai Strait, on Wednesday, August 17, 1831

R C, Wakefield, pseud.  [Richard Cope] Cope, Richard (1776–1856) ODNB
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Genre:

Reportage

Subjects:

Steamships, Accidents, Death, Piety, Electricity


    Gives an account of the loss of the steamer during a storm. Propelled by only one engine, the ship made slow progress against the wind and arrived at the mouth of the Menai Strait as the tide was turning. Suddenly 'the steam got so low, that the engine could not keep the packet in its proper course' (339). With the bilge pumps choked, the water 'so overflowed the coals, that in renewing the fires, the wet coals slackened them, and the steam could not be maintained', and the ship became fixed on a sand bank (340). Criticizes the behaviour of the ship's captain, Lieutenant Atkinson Atkinson, Lieut (fl. 1831) YM3/4/10/2
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. Reflects at some length on the closeness of death, and the need for piety. Observes that death 'may arrest us in the house; at a party; in a carriage; in the shop; in the house of God as well as in a steam packet. One may be struck by the electric fluid, another by apoplexy' (344).



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Issue [11] (November 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 361–63.

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The Giant's Causeway, Ireland

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Geology, Mineralogy, Vulcanology, Mathematics


    Describes the Giant's Causeway as 'one of the most singular and curious specimens of Nature's workmanship' (361). Discusses the occurrence of basalt in various parts of Europe. Describes the 'basaltic field' of the Giant's Causeway. Observes that the 'mathematician will be astonished at observing that nature is also a profound scholar, and that whatever variety of form may occur in the adjacent columns, she never fails to arrange the value of the concurring angles, so as to equal the required four right angles. The architect will receive instruction in the piling of his blocks into great independent columns, with an accuracy and permanence not seen in the works of art'. Describes the Causeway as 'part of a stratum' which probably extends to the Scottish coast; attributes some of the phenomena to 'volcanic or igneous' action, and others to an 'aqueous cause'. (362) A footnote refers those 'who are desirous of pursuing the curious inquiry into the origin of basaltes' to Aubuisson de Voisins 1814 Aubuisson de Voisins, Jean Francois d' 1814. An Account of the Basalts of Saxony: With Observations on the Origin of Basalts in General, trans. by P. Neill, Edinburgh: Constable
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and the works of Richard Kirwan Kirwan, Richard (1733–1812) ODNB
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and Robert Jameson Jameson, Robert (1774–1854) DSB
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.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 363–64.

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New Zealanders

Anon

Genre:

Extract, Anecdote

Publications extracted:

Craik 1830 Craik, George Lillie 1830. The New Zealanders, Library of Entertaining Knowledge, London: Charles Knight
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Subjects:

Exploration, Instruments, Superstition


    Retells an account of the superstitious fear generated among the New Zealanders by the sight of a watch.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 376–79.

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Practice Makes Perfect. Illustration

R C, Wakefield, pseud.  [Richard Cope] Cope, Richard (1776–1856) ODNB
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Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Mathematics, Education, Endeavour, Piety


    Begins with a short Persian tale to illustrate the theme, followed by a discussion of the topic with other examples. The narrator recalls: 'I was one day employed in shewing Theodore, a very sprightly lad, some of the figures employed in mensuration, he started at the sight, and observed, "I shall never understand them," and yet, after sometime he acquired a competent knowledge of squares, angles, diameters, &c' (377). Gives other examples relating to the perseverance of students in their lessons. 'The rule in arithmetic which goes by the name of "practice", is undoubtedly one of the most useful in the science of numbers for all the purposes of common calculation. It is highly useful to the housekeeper in estimating the amount of tradesmen's bills, servants' wages &c. &c., but to be expert and correct in this rule, attention and diligence are necessary' (378). Applies the same principle to religious concerns.



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 385–91.

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Itinerant Thoughts

I T, pseud.  [I T]
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/ M G, pseud.  [M G]
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Genre:

Miscellaneous / Afterword

Subjects:

Reasoning, Feeling, Botany, Piety


    Reflects on the sometimes capricious nature of thought: 'A wild-flower beneath the feet, or the hum of a beetle in the air, calls it off from its contemplations, and a new series of ideas dissipates and enfeebles its powers of abstraction' (385). The pious heart, however, will call the reasoning mind back to its duty. Describes a meditation while walking in the woods. Seeing some Epilobium reminds the narrator that a young friend had the previous evening observed that she had never forgotten the name of that plant, since the narrator had told her about its habit, taxonomy, and form. 'This little plant then, thought I, is a botanical memorandum [...] with which my young friend always associates an idea of me; and in the study of science such remembrances are surely very pleasing' (386). The narrator wishes, however, that the lesson thus impressed had been more sacred, and the remainder of the meditation concerns such sacred lessons. Observes: 'it is only so far as we know Christ the infinite wisdom, that any knowledge is valuable [...]. As one of the fathers of old, speaking of the truth of the philosophical sciences, well observes,—"Unhappy is that man who knows all these things, and knows not thee, O God! But blessed is he who knows thee, though he knows not all these things"' (387). An afterword signed 'M. G.' notes: 'The above paper is signed "I. T." which probably means either Itinerant Thoughts, or, that it is written by a person in the habit of mental speculation, when wandering through the beautiful scenery of nature' (391).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 391.

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The Glow-Worm

W R R, W
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Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Entomology, Theology of Nature, Gender, Piety


    Reflects on the kindness of God to insects as exemplified by his giving 'a hymeneal torch' to female glow-worms to enable the male to find his way 'back to his partner' after 'his nightly rambles'. Invites the reader 'to imitate the Glow-worm, and be content to shine in obscurity if the Lord' place him or her there. Enquires: 'And will not young females be determined to resemble the female Glow-worm, and to cultivate that sweetness of temper, and that lustre of piety which will in after years attract the attention and affection of those with whom they are connected. Let the brightness of personal religion be to them, what the beautiful light is to the Glow-worm'.



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Issue [12] (December 1831)Expand    Contract

Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 397–98.

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Cave of the Giant's Causeway, Ireland

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Geology, Aesthetics


    Describes the cave and the basalt from which it is formed. Observes its resemblance to gothic architecture, remarking that 'ideas of sublimity are necessarily associated with such a subject' and that such scenes probably inspired 'the ancient Gothic architects' (398).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 398–404.

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The Governess  [12/12]

M M S, pseud.  [Mary M Sherwood] Sherwood (née Butt), Mary Martha (1775–1851) ODNB
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Cutt, M. Nancy 1974. Mrs. Sherwood and Her Books for Children: A Study, London: Oxford University Press
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Genre:

Short Fiction, Serial

Subjects:

Botany, Education, Geology, Biblical Authority, Reading, Piety, Gender


    The narrator is a governess who has been employed in a series of families. In this final episode, she comes to live with an enlightened Christian family, the Wynnes. Of Mr Wynne she observes: 'I had never [...] been so much associated with a gentleman who united [...] the most perfect manners, real and enlightened piety, and much knowledge of various descriptions'. The 'first lesson of botany' she ever received was as she walked up a hill with Mr and Mrs Wynne, and Mr Wynne promised 'further instruction' if she were 'diligent'. (400) Part of the family routine after tea was for the ladies to do needlework for the poor, and the young gentlemen to draw, while the 'excellent father instructed his family'. In this, he 'took the scripture as his basis, though at times taking occasion to diverge from his text as any peculiar circumstance seemed to point; for instance, when in course of reading he came to the flood, he read one or two of the best theories selected from his library respecting the natural causes and effects of the deluge, and thus he kept the interest of his auditors continually awake, and brought them back with renewed interest to the simple text of scripture'. (403) The narrator claims to 'have often admired the plan, and wished that all learning could thus be made to wait upon the inspired word' (404).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 406–08.

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Sandwich Island Schools (Extract of a Letter from Messrs. Richards Richards, Mr (fl. 1831) YM3/4/12/3
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and Green Green, Mr (fl. 1831) YM3/4/12/3
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, Missionaries at Lahina)

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Extract, Letter, Reportage

Publications extracted:

Mr Richards Richards, Mr (fl. 1831) YM3/4/12/3
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, Mr Green Green, Mr (fl. 1831) YM3/4/12/3
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Subjects:

Imperialism, Religion, Education, Mathematics


    The extract reports: 'About 150 persons on the island [of Maui] have made considerable advance in arithmetic. These are the teachers employed in the common schools, together with the princess and a few of her female attendants'. Among the questions proposed to them at the public examination was: 'How many seconds since the death of Captain Cook Cook, James (1728–79) DSB
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, it being fifty-two years two months and seven days?'. (406) Reports that 'several ship-masters were present, and took slates themselves, in order to ascertain the correctness of the answers given by the school. There was not a question proposed, however, that was not answered by some one of the scholars sooner than by any of the foreign gentlemen. It will gratify you to know that the princess stands at the head of this class, or is at least equal with the best' (407).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 413–16.

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The Young Exhorted to Improve the Alarm Excited by the Cholera Morbus

C of C C of C
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Genre:

Homily

Subjects:

Disease, Epidemiology, Death, Immorality, Unbelief


    Begins: 'My dear young friends, you have heard much of this dreadful epidemic, and of its awful ravages, but I say to you, fear not the Cholera, fear not death which can only kill the body, but rather fear that which will cast both soul and body into hell—even sin!' (413).



Youth's Magazine,  3rd ser. 4 (1831), 416–17.

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Bridge at Schaffhausen

G K G G, G K
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Genre:

Miscellaneous

Subjects:

Engineering, Mechanics, Mathematics


    Describes the successful building of a large wooden arch and truss bridge by Hans U Grubenmann Grubenmann, Hans Ulrich (1709–83) EB
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, despite his being 'totally ignorant of mathematics, and not versed in the theory of mechanics' (417).



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