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The Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine [1st]  Introduction
Volume 4  (May 1855 to April 1856)
Issue [1] ([May] 1855)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 3–6.

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Anecdotes of Cookery

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Chemistry


    Noting the amount of 'study' demanded by the 'science' of cookery, the author quotes the 'celebrated' cook, Louis E Ude Ude, Louis Eustache (d. 1846) ODNB
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, who pointed out to Humphry Davy Davy, Sir Humphry, Baronet (1778–1829) DSB ODNB
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that the Royal Institution Royal Institution of Great Britain
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'shall nevare be complet till dere is une chair of cookery' (5).



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 24–25.

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The Tree of Ten Thousand Images

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Botany, Natural History, Comparative Philology, Travel

Publications cited:

Huc [1852] Huc, Evariste Regis [1852]. Travels in Tartary, Thibet, and China During the Years 1844–5–6, by M. Huc, trans. by W. Hazlitt, London: Office of the National Illustrated Library
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    Discusses the observation that a tree in 'Thibet' bore leaves which were marked with 'well-formed Thibetian characters', themselves apparently integral to the structure of the leaf.



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 30–31.

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Things worth Knowing

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Meteorology, Electricity


    Offers advice on what to do to avoid an electric shock in thunder-storms (31).



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 31.

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Sick Room and Nursery

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Health, Medical Treatment

People mentioned:

John Hunter, Hunter, John (1728–93) DSB
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Dr Warren Warren, Dr (fl. 1855) ED1/4/1/4
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Institutions mentioned:

Boston Society of Natural History Boston Society of Natural History
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Issue [2] ([June] [1855])Expand    Contract

No Articles Indexed

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Issue [3] ([July] [1855])Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 95–94.

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The Sick Room and the Nursery

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Health, Pollution, Hygiene, Public Health

Publications cited:

Atkinson 1848 Atkinson, John Charles 1848. Change of Air: Fallacies Regarding it, London: John Oliver
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    Discusses 'received fallacies as to the effects of change of air in certain forms of disease' (95).



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Issue [4] ([August] 1855)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 108–11.

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The Physician's Secret

Anon

Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Skill, Medical Treatment


    Describes the feelings of a young French physician, Fournier, who learns that a fellow student has gained a situation through 'efficient friends' rather than 'merit' (108). The physician diagnoses a serious illness in an elderly patient and offers to pay for the expensive medical treatment, although the patient's god-daughter tells him to point out to the patient that the medicine is a gift. The physician later renounces 'the application of the ineffectual remedies' (110).



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 127.

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The Sick Room and Nursery

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Medical Treatment

People mentioned:

Dr Day, Day, Dr (fl. 1855) ED1/4/4/2
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Dominic J Corrigan, Corrigan, Sir Dominic John (1802–80) ODNB
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James Copland Copland, James (1791–1870) ODNB
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    Describes treatments for lumbago, and the 'transference of vitality, which appeared to take place when young persons are habitually placed in contact with the aged'.



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Issue [5] ([September] 1855)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 159–60.

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The Sick Room and the Nursery

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Nutrition

Publications cited:

Farmer's Register Farmer's Register (cited 1865) ED1/4/5/1
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    Dicussses the medicinal properties of tomatoes, with reference to the work of Dr Bennett Bennett, Dr (fl. 1855) ED1/4/5/1
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, 'a professor of some celebrity' (159), and to Constantin S Rafinesque Rafinesque, Constantin Samuel (1783–1840) WBI
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, Dungleson Dungleson, —— (fl. 1855) ED1/4/5/1
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, and Prof. Dickens Dickens, Prof (fl. 1855) ED1/4/5/1
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.



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Issue [6] ([October] [1855])Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 164–66.

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Mental Medicine

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Disease, Mental Illness, Psychology, Medical Treatment, Supernaturalism

People mentioned:

William Cullen, Cullen, William (1710–90) DSB
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William Gregory Gregory, William (1803–58) DSB
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    Upholding the efficacy of 'mental remedies' for physical pain, describes a case of a 'complete though temporary cure performed on a young lady' by the effect of mental agency. The author explains that 'mental medicine' failed to cure his own bout of quartan fever. (164) Describes a failed attempt to treat a 'mental malady'—a man's vision of a phantom form of his sister—by 'corporeal means', namely, by inviting the man's sister to masquerade as the phantom. (165) Concludes with a similarly disastrous attempt to cure a woman suffering from catalepsy by introducing her to the husband she mistakenly believed to be dead. Warns people against the 'incautious use of the means to which we are accustomed to attribute less power than they really possess' (166).



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 182–85.

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Charlotte May

Anon

Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Disease, Death


    Describes a doctor giving advice to a woman about the best treatment of her sick young daughter. The condition of the girl worsens to the point where the doctor tells the woman, 'your own feelings probably tell you as much as all my science can' (183). Following the girl's death, the doctors who had been brought in to save her life argue over the treatment she should have received. One doctor concludes that although it was 'unprofessional' to say so, 'the child should not have died'; the mother exclaims to the practitioners 'Heaven help you' (184).



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Issue [7] ([November] [1855])Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 198–200.

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Baldeagle on the Sea Serpent

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Address, Spoof

Subjects:

Monstrosities, Animal Behaviour, Hunting


    Reports on a speech, putatively made by Babylon W Baldeagle, concerning the recent American capture and antics of the 'great national monstrum', particularly its collision with an iceberg (198). Baldeagle proceeds to argue that the 'incomparable basilik' is 'eminently and exclusively' the property of America and urges others to leave it alone, wherever it may roam or whatever it does. Claims that the 'people will rise up a mass' and 'chastise the dastards' who threaten or 'offer indignities' to the serpent. (199) Laments the fact that the serpent lies in its oceanic cavern, with an injured fin, and calls on the American people to attend to the sick beast.



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Issue [8] ([December] 1855)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 226–28.

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The Protected Female

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Psychology, Meteorology, Natural Law


    Noting that science has 'unfolded the laws which regulate the seeming irregularity of storms', anticipates that 'the present system of minute contemplation will discover the signs' of mankind's 'moral storms and diseases' (226).



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 243–47.

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Aunt Dolly's History

Anon

Genre:

Short Fiction

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Health


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Issue [9] ([January] 1856)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 287.

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Sick Room and Nursery

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Health, Hygiene, Gas Chemistry, Nutrition, Putrefaction, Physiology, Pollution, Sanitation


    Presents 'Fifteen Rules for the Preservation of Health'. These explain the chemical processes involved in respiration, the importance of food, water and warmth to the body, the dangers of inhaling gases produced in combustion or by decaying organic matter, the physiological reasons for cleansing the skin, the importance of simple foods and of maintaining steady body temperature.



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Issue 10 ([February] 1856)Expand    Contract

No Articles Indexed

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Issue 11 ([March] 1856)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 333–35.

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Prize Composition—Notes on Nurses

Annie, Wisbeach Annie
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Genre:

Introduction / Essay

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Education, Disease, Human Development, Medical Treatment, Gender


    The introduction to 'Notes on Nurses', the winning entry in a competition for an essay on nurses, points out that all the essays urge the need for a college for training nurses, and thus appear to agree with John F D Maurice's Maurice, John Frederick Denison (1805–72) ODNB
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scheme for a 'Female College for the Help of the Rich and the Poor'. The introduction picks out some of the key features of each essay.

    Noting the sparseness of nurses like 'Sairey Gamp', 'Notes on Nurses' insists that nurses typically show 'the greatest care' and 'watchful solitude'. It upholds the importance of appropriate 'looks and voice' when dealing with infants. (333) Thinks nurses are great 'rarities' and agrees with a report from The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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linking infant mortality to nurses' poor and brutal treatment of infants. Notes that rich patients are nursed by individuals who 'do not understand nursing [...] as a science'. Urges that nurses need to have a 'trained mind to comprehend the course of treatment prescribed' and the skill to create the best conditions for recovery. (334) Adds that nursing education should consist of 'grafting the principles of science on the natural tenderness of woman'. Fears that the 'institution' financed by the 'Nightingale Nightingale, Florence (1820–1910) ODNB
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testimonial' will not enroll people of 'youth and religious enthusiasm' but hopes it will improve nurses' medical knowledge and career. Concludes by praising the 'noble self-denial' of the nurses at the Crimea. (335)



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 339–40.

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Lectures to Ladies

Anon

Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Anon 1855 Anon. 1855. Lectures to Ladies on Practical Subjects, Cambridge: Macmillan & Co.
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Subjects:

Education, Disease, Sanitation, Hygiene, Gender


    Notes that among the duties to which this work 'call[s] ladies' are to know the 'number and character' and breeding propensity of fevers, and to know 'the laws that apply to the suppression of dirt or nuisances' (339).



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 349–50.

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Literary Notices

Anon

Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Neilson 1855, Neilson, William [1855]. Mesmerism in its Relation to Health and Disease and the Present State of Medicine, Edinburgh: Shepherd & Elliot
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, Entomologist's Annual Entomologist's Annual (1855–74) Waterloo Directory
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[1] [Review of Mesmerism in its Relation to Health and Disease, by William Nielson]

Subjects:

Mesmerism, Animal Magnetism, Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners


    Notes William Neilson's Neilson, William (fl. 1855) ED1/4/11/3
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attack on the 'prevailing systems of medicine' for being in 'a state of darkness and confusion'. Denies that he has proved conclusively that mesmerism can 'afford us any better resource' (349).



[5] [Review of the Entomologist's Annual]

Subjects:

Entomology, Botany


    Notes the expansion in the number of practitioners of 'the science of entomology' and considers one virtue of the book to be that it 'may be pursued together with botany' (350).




Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 350.

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[Title Needed]

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Light, Instruments, Amusement


    Following the suggestion of Edward G Wood Wood, Edward George (1811–96) WBI
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, 'optician of Cheapside', explains the principle of the stereoscope. Concludes from a series of 'Elementary Scientific Papers' that Wood sent to the periodical with one of his stereoscopes, that the 'workman is not a workman merely, but well read in the science he labours for'.



Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 351–52.

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Sick-Room and Nursery

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Instructions

Subjects:

Physiology, Health


    Explains the physiological reasons for allowing infants to sleep as much as possible.



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Issue [12] ([April] 1856)Expand    Contract

Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine,  4 (1855–56), 373–74.

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Literary Notices

Anon

Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Pulte 1855 Pulte, Joseph Hippolyt 1855. Homeopathic Domestic Physician: Containing the Treatment of Diseases; with Popular Explanations of Anatomy, (revised and supplied with explanatory notes by John Epps), London: James Epps
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Subjects:

Homeopathy, Mesmerism, Hydropathy, Health, Medical Treatment


    Notes the evidence supporting the possibility of curing diseases by faith or imagination. Advises followers of allopathy, hydropathy, and mesmerism to turn to the Royal College of Physicians Royal College of Physicians
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, 'wet towels', and 'the mesmeric pass' respectively (373). Recommends the book under review, and notes that with it and 'faith' in the homeopathic system, a reader can become their 'own homeopathic domestic physician' (374).



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